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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Your paragraph at the start of this thread has saved my life just a question, I always struggle with the introduction. Say, if the question was "how does <insert name> present love in <insert play>?", do I answer it straight away, and lead it up with some quotes, give a roundup of the whole play, or what..? It always catches me and puts me in a bad thought pattern, it would be so helpful if you are able to tell me how you introduce the essay thankssssss
    Haha glad I could help!

    Never put quotes in an intro. That makes it a point, which it isn't Intros are max 3-4 lines long, briefly explaining what the writer does, and how.

    So if your quesoin isthat, you'd say "X creates the idea of love in an X way by using a range of linguistic techniques" and thats that. Fill the second X with the generalisation of how you feel about the play, and off you go!

    Highly recommend looking on the exam reports for A* material, look at their intros, memorize it and rephrase it in the exam. Exactly what I did

    After the intro just go straight into the PEE or PEEZEER whatever someone else said on this thread that was also really good. After the first paragraph and you're onto the second, try and link the two together like "Although the play connotes love is evil, character X has different ideas." then make the point, etc
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    Haha glad I could help!

    Never put quotes in an intro. That makes it a point, which it isn't Intros are max 3-4 lines long, briefly explaining what the writer does, and how.

    So if your quesoin isthat, you'd say "X creates the idea of love in an X way by using a range of linguistic techniques" and thats that. Fill the second X with the generalisation of how you feel about the play, and off you go!

    Highly recommend looking on the exam reports for A* material, look at their intros, memorize it and rephrase it in the exam. Exactly what I did

    After the intro just go straight into the PEE or PEEZEER whatever someone else said on this thread that was also really good. After the first paragraph and you're onto the second, try and link the two together like "Although the play connotes love is evil, character X has different ideas." then make the point, etc
    Cool, thanks! I'm super nervous for English Literature, I got an A* for my coursework so I'm perfectly capable of doing it but my rushed essays just aren't always the greatest Do you ever put a conclusion, and if so do you just round up all the points you've made?
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Cool, thanks! I'm super nervous for English Literature, I got an A* for my coursework so I'm perfectly capable of doing it but my rushed essays just aren't always the greatest Do you ever put a conclusion, and if so do you just round up all the points you've made?
    I think my coursework was at a high B, maybe an A? Eh

    I remember only doing a conclusion for certain, longer-marked questions. With Edexcel where was a 4 marker, 8 marker and 10 marker in section one (please correct me if I'm wrong, but the gaps were not big at all) all about a fragment of text in the exam. These I would never write a conclusion, but always an intro. For longer marks then yep go for the conclusion

    The conclusion I still find today with geography difficult! I usually just reword the intro, but put it in past tense. Also I only put "to conclude" if I'm in a rush.

    You'd start the conclusion like "X has used (list all the linguistics you've spoken about- verbs, similies, alliteration, ygm) to emit the emotions of X to the reader.

    All Xs have to be specific in the conclusion, but can be broader in the intro
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    I think my coursework was at a high B, maybe an A? Eh

    I remember only doing a conclusion for certain, longer-marked questions. With Edexcel where was a 4 marker, 8 marker and 10 marker in section one (please correct me if I'm wrong, but the gaps were not big at all) all about a fragment of text in the exam. These I would never write a conclusion, but always an intro. For longer marks then yep go for the conclusion

    The conclusion I still find today with geography difficult! I usually just reword the intro, but put it in past tense. Also I only put "to conclude" if I'm in a rush.

    You'd start the conclusion like "X has used (list all the linguistics you've spoken about- verbs, similies, alliteration, ygm) to emit the emotions of X to the reader.

    All Xs have to be specific in the conclusion, but can be broader in the intro
    Ok cool, yeah on my English Lit exam we have two essays, one on Romeo and Juliet and one on a piece of unseen poetry. I know that I need a conclusion on the poetry bit, but it's helpful to know what to write for the R+J bit as I am always stuck and it is a 40 marker so I'm sure they'll be at least one mark for a conclusion. Thanks again!
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    (Original post by stripedbox)
    If your coursework is alright as well
    Full UMS coursework as far as I know of


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    (Original post by MBK14)
    Full UMS coursework as far as I know of


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    Fair play - you'll be fine then
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    Spent the whole year getting 3/20 and low marks like that last year in lit, accepted fate because I had such a bad work ethic but came out with an A*. I told a sixth former friend about it bc she wanted to do lit at uni, so she offered to help me and it did. Just 20 minutes during thursday PM reg, she sat me down with a random poem and got me to talk about it. I was so stiff and couldn't come up with anything at first, but within weeks I was writing paragraphs about them and surprised by what I could do. Remember to stick to PEE paragraphs and stick to that only, linkig sentences with snazzy words like "thus" "furthermore", or if you do a language think about all the connectives you're made to use in writing and use those. I used to get panicky over "How do I even know if its worth of a point???" in the exam, but NEVER be afraid to point out the obvious. The text is 100% your canvas and you can think about absolutely anything, as long as you use evidence and PLEASE use loads of evidence whilst in your writing (forgot the word for it) like: 'Knowing the write explains the cat as "extremely fluffy", it also links into the 1735 battle of kittens'. Use adult vocab, compliment the author as much as possible e.g "Orwell cleverly states that" bc examiners are english nerds an if they think you <3 their people they will love you. Don't be afraid to be controversial, and the more evidence the better. Know your way around your books, be aware of context and just enjoy the exam really
    Thanks for this! Best post I've seen so far.. I have my English lit on Monday and I'm freaking out but this helped me calm down a bit! Thank you 😊😊😊


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    If I got about 27 in my coursework is it possible for me to get an A* altogether im on AQA btw


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    Does your friend want to teach more student?
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    Honestly, it isn't too difficult. The main thing to focus on is ensuring you have a fluent and easily understood style of writing, as that will get your marker on side at first glance.

    Don't choose too much to write about. Pick a quote and zoom right in on it, explore every little detail you can and be sure to link to the question.

    I got an A* at GCSE last year and I was absolutely thrilled with it. You'll be great 😊
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    Pretty damn easy if you're good at English and you like the books.

    I got full marks in the Mice and Men and an A* overall. Didn't do any revision
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    (Original post by MBK14)
    How hard is it to get A* in English Literature GCSE?
    English Literature at GCSE is probably the easiest GCSE subject. I'm not sure if it has changed since but when I did it, all the examiners wanted was feature spotting and simplistic analysis of a text. So for example, in Of Mice and Men if you talked about how the the ash pile at the beginning is symbolism for the failure of the American Dream, you'd be given an A*. At A-Level doing that is a D grade work and at university level that would be a fail.
 
 
 
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