Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dausa99)
    Another one 😂: Why do we use catalysts in these chemical reactions? Also, give one example of a smart polymer and how it aids human life!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Catalysts are used to speed up the chemical reaction. Hydrogel is a smart polymer which is used in disposable nappies?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dizgurl)
    To make it solid at room temperature?
    Yep, so we can use them as spreads to put on toast and bake with!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dizgurl)
    Catalysts are used to speed up the chemical reaction. Hydrogel is a smart polymer which is used in disposable nappies?
    Yep, but in past exams you have to put that they aren't used up in the reaction.

    Hydrogel is a good example, we also have heat sensitive polymers that are used in stitches to make sure they aren't to tight and also dissolve harmlessly into the body.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    These are the conditions used in the industrial manufacture of ammonia:

    Pressure: 200 atmospheres
    Temperature: 450 degrees celsius
    Catalyst: Iron

    Why are these conditions used? Why don't we increase the temperature or atmosphere?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    it's a compromise between yield and cost/speed, higher pressures are too dangerous and require special expensive equipment,
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anmol_.)
    Because it's an alkali
    Limestone contains calcium carbonate. the carbonate ions thus react with the hydrogen ions in the acidic soil forming water and carbon dioxide and thus rendering the soil less acidic.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Question: Name an alloy, a use of that alloy and why it's stronger then the original metal!




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Question: why can only certain metals be displaced by Carbon from their ore?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dausa99)
    Question: Name an alloy, a use of that alloy and why it's stronger then the original metal!




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    steel
    pots and pans?
    because it's a good conductor of heat but has a high melting point, and this is due to the, um, stronger bonds that require more energy to overcome than in the original metal..
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Milzime)
    steel
    pots and pans?
    because it's a good conductor of heat but has a high melting point, and this is due to the, um, stronger bonds that require more energy to overcome than in the original metal..
    So you got steel right. That's an alloy. We do use them in pots. 👌🏼

    We use steel because it's stronger then iron. (cars)

    Steel is stronger then iron because of the atoms. Within normal iron, all the atoms are the same size in layers so they can easily move around layers slipping over layers. (bend, snap not strong). However, when you put small amounts of carbon in the iron the different sizes of atoms makes it hard for the atoms to move making it stronger!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dausa99)
    So you got steel right. That's an alloy. We do use them in pots. 👌🏼

    We use steel because it's stronger then iron. (cars)

    Steel is stronger then iron because of the atoms. Within normal iron, all the atoms are the same size in layers so they can easily move around layers slipping over layers. (bend, snap not strong). However, when you put small amounts of carbon in the iron the different sizes of atoms makes it hard for the atoms to move making it stronger!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Describe how limestone is quarried

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dausa99)
    Question: why can only certain metals be displaced by Carbon from their ore?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Only a few metals are less reactive than carbon, the metals more reactive than carbon can not be displaced and electrolysis is needed.

    If we're talking about Titanium, Titanium ends up reacting with the carbon and is why you use noble gases.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SunnyBoys)
    Only a few metals are less reactive than carbon, the metals more reactive than carbon can not be displaced and electrolysis is needed.

    If we're talking about Titanium, Titanium ends up reacting with the carbon and is why you use noble gases.
    Is that how you draw butene

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Describe how limestone is quarried

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    We use explosives to blast huge holes in the earth and then take the big chunks on limestone and transport them. Noise is noise pollution. Dust is air. Scares animals, lowers biodiversity


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    These are the conditions used in the industrial manufacture of ammonia:

    Pressure: 200 atmospheres
    Temperature: 450 degrees celsius
    Catalyst: Iron

    Why are these conditions used? Why don't we increase the temperature or atmosphere?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Isn't this the haber process in C3? We don't increase temperature as the forwards reaction is exothermic so it moves the equilibrium the wrong way. Lowering the temperature means a lower rate of reaction so 450 is a compromise.
    The pressure is 200 because high pressure favours the forwards reaction so increases yield.
    We don't need it for c1, do we?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Is that how you draw butene

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    you draw butene like this CH2CH1CH2CH3 all with single bonds apart from the first c=c bond that will have a double at the beginning
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alyxgower)
    Isn't this the haber process in C3? We don't increase temperature as the forwards reaction is exothermic so it moves the equilibrium the wrong way. Lowering the temperature means a lower rate of reaction so 450 is a compromise.
    The pressure is 200 because high pressure favours the forwards reaction so increases yield.
    We don't need it for c1, do we?
    Nope not at all. Also they don't use any lower than 450 as the rate of reaction would be too low or it would not react at all then.
    I have a questions!

    Give the differences between the gases in the current atmosphere and the past atmosphere and explain why there has been this difference. Finally, why has carbon dioxide been increasing recently.

    This would be like an 8-10 mark questions (I know these don't exist)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    What is locked up carbon dioxide!!!?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    What is locked up carbon dioxide!!!?
    Is it when carbon dioxide from the early atmosphere formed sedimentary rocks or fossil fuels?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SunnyBoys)
    Is it when carbon dioxide from the early atmosphere formed sedimentary rocks or fossil fuels?
    Yeppp.
    Give two methods of cracking?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Yeppp.
    Give two methods of cracking?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    One method is vaporizing the fraction (kerosene) and passing it over a catalyst (Al203) causing it to be broken down into Octane and Ethene

    I didn't know if there was another form
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.