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    Hi LMH,
    I'm hoping to apply for English/English and History, but I'm terrified everyone else applying for English will have better close reading skills and perform better in the ELAT and at interview. Do you have any tips for preparing for the ELAT and the interview?
    Thanks!
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    Hi, I'm under the impression that in 2017 the UCAS points tariff will change slightly, after looking at the intake for the history course in comparison to applicants UCAS points total, i was wondering if this will be changing slightly. do you have an idea of what total UCAS points will be needed to increase chances on getting onto a course (history especially).

    Many thanks, Saffron.
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    (Original post by mosisgansta)
    Hello my name is Moises and I want to know what grades I need to have in my GCSE`s or in my A` Level to enter in Oxford University. Can you tell me the expierences and what time do you enter and finish the university every day?

    Thanks
    Hi Moises,

    Oxford offers are always at least three As, although this varies from subject to subject. Have a look at the university website to check out the requirements for the course(s) you are interested in: https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...rements?wssl=1

    Although Oxford applicants will in general have a strong GCSE record, there are no strict requirements for GCSE grades as there are for A Levels. We say the average number of A*s at GCSE for a successful applicant is between 5 and 7, but this is only an average - in reality, this varies a lot with each application, and tutors use a number of different criteria to work out who is most likely to make the required grades at A-Level.

    There is no set time that a day at Oxford starts or finish - this changes all the time depending on which subject you study and even which week it is! Oxford requires students to balance their time between timetabled contact hours, such as lectures, seminars, and tutorials; and independent study, which you have to organise yourself.

    Hope this is helpful,

    India
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    How do you view applications to Mathematics after a gap year ? Will I need extremely high MAT scores to be considered ( 90+ out of 100 ) ?
    Or is the score requirement a bit more forgiving ?

    Thank you .
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    (Original post by Showdle)
    Hi, I'm under the impression that in 2017 the UCAS points tariff will change slightly, after looking at the intake for the history course in comparison to applicants UCAS points total, i was wondering if this will be changing slightly. do you have an idea of what total UCAS points will be needed to increase chances on getting onto a course (history especially).

    Many thanks, Saffron.
    Hi Saffron,

    Oxford do not make offers based on UCAS points, but specify grades; this is currently AAA for all arts and humanities courses (including History), and the university does not currently have any plans to alter this. The intake for each course does occasionally fluctuate due to how colleges arrange their places (for History, this alters from year to year due to how places for other, smaller history courses such as Ancient & Modern or History & Politics are allocated), or simply due to higher or lower numbers of applicants.

    Please be reassured that the entry requirements are not likely to change in the near future :-)

    India
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    (Original post by niamhisokay)
    Hi LMH,
    I'm hoping to apply for English/English and History, but I'm terrified everyone else applying for English will have better close reading skills and perform better in the ELAT and at interview. Do you have any tips for preparing for the ELAT and the interview?
    Thanks!
    Hi there!

    Firstly, it's really important to have confidence in yourself and not doubt your abilities. The fact that other Oxford applicants are likely to be very bright and talented students does not mean that you aren't just as strong and have just as much of a chance! Do you know what it is about the ELAT and the interview process that worries you? It definitely sounds like you are anxious about close reading, but that's probably the easiest thing to get yourself used to (and the most difficult to "revise" for - so everyone is in the same boat...). Have a look on the ELAT website: http://www.admissionstestingservice....at/about-elat/ . This has a set of past and specimen papers which I would really recommend taking the time to look over (I did the ELAT myself! :-) ). Don't feel you have to go straight in and write a full mock paper straight away - just get yourself used to reading the texts and responding to them. Remember, there are no right or wrong answers! What's most important is you have opinions on what you read, and can explain and link those opinions. You can practice reading "unseen" texts any time - perhaps your English teacher could recommend you some poetry to read?

    Interviews are a nerve-wracking experience for everyone who receives one, and I know a lot of my peers found it useful to organise a mock interview (with a teacher, generally) beforehand. It's also important to ensure you feel confident speaking about anything you have written about in your personal statement! If you do receive an interview (especially at LMH) then you would most likely be pleasantly surprised - our tutors go out of their way to make sure interviewees are put at ease and don't try to catch people out, so don't believe the horror stories/urban myths which you might have heard. LMH also makes sure their interviewees are looked after by a team of admissions "runners", who are student helpers picked because they are so friendly and helpful. Most of us were scared or anxious about applying to Oxford too, but the advice we always give people is to give it a go - the only way you definitely won't get in is if you don't apply :-)

    Hope this reassures you a bit!

    India
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    (Original post by -Gifted-)
    How do you view applications to Mathematics after a gap year ? Will I need extremely high MAT scores to be considered ( 90+ out of 100 ) ?
    Or is the score requirement a bit more forgiving ?

    Thank you .
    Hi there,

    I answered a very similar question about gap year applicants earlier in the thread - I will copy my answer below because it very much applies the same to Maths :-)

    "Students who apply during a gap year are not discriminated against at all - you are judged on the same factors as those who apply whilst still at school, the only significant difference being that you will already know what your final grades will be and as such can be given an unconditional rather than conditional offer. There are plenty of students across the university who have taken gap years!

    Applying whilst you aren't at school full time does offer the advantage of having more time to read further into your subject or gain experiences which would add depth to your personal statement and all round understanding. That's not to say that Oxford will expect you to spend your entire gap year studying, but tutors do like to see/hear about how you have kept up your interest in the subject during that year off. Also don't forget to keep in contact with your school as they will still need to write your reference and offer you guidance throughout the UCAS process, as well as organising entry for any admissions tests you will need to take."

    Re the MAT test, there is no particular threshold score which you are expected to achieve; it is one of many pieces of information the university receives about its applicants, and scores are judged upon the average each year rather than having a set mark. A slightly lower MAT score would not mean it would be impossible for you to be offered an interview.

    Hope this helps!

    India
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    Hello, I am currently thinking of applying for chemistry at Oxford, but have no work experience. Would further reading/ going to lectures be enough to make a competitive application ? Thank you
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    (Original post by jemstar24)
    Hello, I am currently thinking of applying for chemistry at Oxford, but have no work experience. Would further reading/ going to lectures be enough to make a competitive application ? Thank you
    Hi there,

    There is no expectation that applicants for any degree course at Oxford would have relevant work experience (with the exception of Medicine) or any particular super-curricular experiences: not everyone is able to access the same things. Further reading and going to Chemistry related lectures (or perhaps even accessing scientific topics via documentaries, blog posts or even science museums) sounds like a great way of demonstrating your enthusiasm for the subject - to make your application as competitive as possible, make sure you are sure of your opinions and responses to what you have seen/heard and are able to articulate them. Good luck!

    India
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    Can mature students apply to the foundation year programme?
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    (Original post by Liam123456)
    Can mature students apply to the foundation year programme?
    Hi Liam, I'm afraid not at present. The foundation year is for school leavers. I hope
    this helps. Jo
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    (Original post by LMH OXFORD)
    Hey there, and welcome to the official Lady Margaret Hall (LMH) 'Ask us anything' thread.

    I’m Marrium, the Outreach Officer at LMH (weird job title right? You can read more about it and me here). LMH is one of the 38 independent colleges of the University of Oxford, and it’s my job to encourage students to think about making an application.

    So if you'd like to find out more about LMH (here's one way to do that) and what it might be like to study here, please do use this thread, or send me a pm and I'll get back to you as soon as I can.

    Hope to hear from you soon!
    Hello!

    2 things:

    - How essential is further maths if I would like to study economics (and management)?

    - To what extend will doing 4 A-levels increase my chances of getting onto such a course?
    Would it be best to do 3 and get the best results I possibly can and alongside that do my Gold Duke of Edinburgh, and show an independent study of an MFL as well as evidence of long term volunteering and commitment to sport etc.
    OR
    Is it best to do 4 to show case my personal capability
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Hello!

    2 things:

    - How essential is further maths if I would like to study economics (and management)?

    - To what extend will doing 4 A-levels increase my chances of getting onto such a course?
    Would it be best to do 3 and get the best results I possibly can and alongside that do my Gold Duke of Edinburgh, and show an independent study of an MFL as well as evidence of long term volunteering and commitment to sport etc.
    OR
    Is it best to do 4 to show case my personal capability
    Hi there,

    Firstly, only Maths A-Level is an essential requirement for Economics & Management.

    Secondly, LMH and the university as a whole does not give extra credit during the admissions process to candidates who have more than the required three A-Levels. Many candidates will have more than this, but if you feel that you are more likely to achieve the required grades in only three subjects then it won't count against you :-) Whilst your extra-curricular activities sound fantastic, this is also something which the Oxford admissions process doesn't really take into account. What we are looking for are "super-curricular" activities - things you have done to demonstrate your enthusiasm for your subject by going above and beyond what is asked of you in the classroom or exam hall. This can range from reading around the subject (not just books but also newspapers - particularly handy for E&M!) to places you have visited or any relevant work experience you have had. Oxford like applicants' personal statements to have a largely academic focus, but other universities would I'm sure be interested to hear about your extracurriculars - if you want to mention them, keep them to a short paragraph at the end of your statement.

    Hope this helps!
    India
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    (Original post by LMH OXFORD)
    Hi there,

    Firstly, only Maths A-Level is an essential requirement for Economics & Management.

    Secondly, LMH and the university as a whole does not give extra credit during the admissions process to candidates who have more than the required three A-Levels. Many candidates will have more than this, but if you feel that you are more likely to achieve the required grades in only three subjects then it won't count against you :-) Whilst your extra-curricular activities sound fantastic, this is also something which the Oxford admissions process doesn't really take into account. What we are looking for are "super-curricular" activities - things you have done to demonstrate your enthusiasm for your subject by going above and beyond what is asked of you in the classroom or exam hall. This can range from reading around the subject (not just books but also newspapers - particularly handy for E&M!) to places you have visited or any relevant work experience you have had. Oxford like applicants' personal statements to have a largely academic focus, but other universities would I'm sure be interested to hear about your extracurriculars - if you want to mention them, keep them to a short paragraph at the end of your statement.

    Hope this helps!
    India
    Thank you so much!

    Just one more thing, which combination of subjects sounds best (if acceptable at all) for economics (and management).

    1. Maths History Economics
    2. Maths History Geography
    3. Maths History Physics

    Would any of these look better than the other?
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    Hi,

    I was wondering whether Oxford undergraduates have an advantage when it comes to applying for post-grad study; even if they were to change colleges? Or do they still have to go through the same process as if they were an external candidate?

    Also, do you hold events with Brookes uni? I'm really all about cultural diversity and I feel like Oxford really lacks here (yes, I understand you take diversity seriously and you have a lot of students from different background etc. but I hope you know from experience what I'm trying to get out here )

    I also heard that during your first few weeks you can change courses if they are fairly similar? How true is this? e.g. German and Linguistics to Psychology and Linguistics?

    Thanks in advance 😁
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Thank you so much!

    Just one more thing, which combination of subjects sounds best (if acceptable at all) for economics (and management).

    1. Maths History Economics
    2. Maths History Geography
    3. Maths History Physics

    Would any of these look better than the other?
    Hi there,

    All three options for your third choice would be perfectly acceptable choices - you would be surprised at how varied the A-Level profiles of each Oxford applicant are! Economics is not a required A-Level, since not all schools will necessarily offer it, but if you are interested in E&M then it could be valuable for your own experience of the subject to study Economics. Oxford are far more concerned, however, with your potential and enthusiasm for degree level study than precisely what combination of subjects you are taking at school (other than any required subjects, of course). It's always best to choose anything which goes into your Oxford application because it is interesting and enjoyable for you, rather than trying to make a tactical guess at what will impress the admissions tutors the most!

    Hope this helps,
    India
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Thank you so much!

    Just one more thing, which combination of subjects sounds best (if acceptable at all) for economics (and management).

    1. Maths History Economics
    2. Maths History Geography
    3. Maths History Physics

    Would any of these look better than the other?
    1Maths-History-Economics
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    Hi LMH ,

    I'm in year 11 and have just finished my GCSEs and am interested in applying to do Chemistry at Oxford. I know Oxford has a flagging system in place , and that it can take type of school into account (i.e. contextualised GCSE data with regards to the average performance of one's school) . I did my GCSEs at a below average state school but have got a scholarship to an international one for sixth form . Would this mean my earlier grades would be viewed with regards to my former school , or my new one ?

    thanks
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    (Original post by patricio_miguel)
    Hi,

    I was wondering whether Oxford undergraduates have an advantage when it comes to applying for post-grad study; even if they were to change colleges? Or do they still have to go through the same process as if they were an external candidate?

    Also, do you hold events with Brookes uni? I'm really all about cultural diversity and I feel like Oxford really lacks here (yes, I understand you take diversity seriously and you have a lot of students from different background etc. but I hope you know from experience what I'm trying to get out here )

    I also heard that during your first few weeks you can change courses if they are fairly similar? How true is this? e.g. German and Linguistics to Psychology and Linguistics?

    Thanks in advance 😁
    Hi there,

    Oxford undergraduates have to go through the same application process for postgraduate study as every other candidate. There are a few scholarships offered which are specifically for Oxford undergraduates moving on to post graduate study (at LMH we have the Henrietta Jex-Blake scholarships, for example) but the main process remains the same.

    As far as I know, the university doesn't hold formal or regular events with Brookes, although sports teams and other societies do hold socials from time to time. There is just as much diversity to be found within the university in its own right, even if it's a work in progress to get this to where it should be! (LMH is definitely leading the way with initiatives like our new Foundation Year) Despite Brookes sharing a city with us, their campus is still quite a way away from the heart of the university and their terms structured very differently to ours - so it isn't always the most practical to arrange things with their students. That's not to say you aren't welcome to arrange events yourself!

    Course changes are quite a complex process for the college and university and it shouldn't be assumed that changing to any course, no matter how similar, is a quick or even definite option. If you have genuine reason for requesting a course change, this could mean you have to wait until after you sit your first set of exams or even be interviewed for your "new" subject. So whilst it isn't impossible, it's far from an ideal situation for anyone (especially as you could be missing out on valuable teaching time in the subject you decide to change to) and we would definitely advise considering your course choice carefully to make sure it is right for you :-)

    Hope this helps!

    India
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    (Original post by Calsiwm_Silicad)
    Hi LMH ,

    I'm in year 11 and have just finished my GCSEs and am interested in applying to do Chemistry at Oxford. I know Oxford has a flagging system in place , and that it can take type of school into account (i.e. contextualised GCSE data with regards to the average performance of one's school) . I did my GCSEs at a below average state school but have got a scholarship to an international one for sixth form . Would this mean my earlier grades would be viewed with regards to my former school , or my new one ?

    thanks
    Hi there,

    Please be reassured that contextual data is applied to the place(s) you took each separate set of qualifications; nor is moving schools for sixth form, as in your case, an unusual set of circumstances! It is also perhaps worth noting that there is a "mitigating circumstances" section on the UCAS form which can be used to alert your chosen universities to anything which should be used to contextualise your application, if your referee considers it appropriate.

    Hope this helps,

    India
 
 
 
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