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    Guys I'm not blaming the invigilator, I'm asking what you think the outcome might be. Not sure why people are defending the invigilator - she's not on trial


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    If I'm honest you will probably get a slap on the wrist and get away with it.

    However obviously there is every possibility of you being disqualified and if this happened you wouldn't really have a case against the university.

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    I think it heavily depends on your uni, at ours they very clearly state before the exam starts that even having your phone on you is a disqualification and a serious academic offense. they say youll get a 0 for the module regardless of whether it was clean or not and full removal from the course if notes are found on it.
    someone had a bottle of water in one of our exams (given out right outside the exam hall by the students union so theyre unable to be tampered with before the exam) and he got sent out of the exam for having the label around it and not having it by his foot when not drinking from it.
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    (Original post by Luiswright31)
    That wouldn't be justice served. What's the point in them voiding her/his exam for this? What is the point? So they can show that they have power and that laws will be enforced? She wasn't cheating. She made a mistake. She does not deserve to potentially have her career ruined because some arrogant snobby examiners feel like they should. What's it's worth to the examiner? Why would you ruin someone's life when you have a choice to let them off or enforce the rule, if she does get in trouble for this, if I was her parents, or even her herself, the examiner would definitely not be getting away with ruining my child's education because they want some extra brownie points from their boss at ****ing AQA headquarters.
    Calm down mate.

    The point is that the OP was caught with a banned item on them. The rule is, as I said, very clear and is there for a reason.

    Arrogant, snobby examiners? Are you kidding me? So should they change the rule to no phones allowed unless you're stressed and forget its on you in which case don't worry about it? Don't be silly.

    Its worth everything to the examiner. They need to show that there is absolute integrity in their exams. If potential cheaters are getting away and they're effectively saying that actually its fine if mobile phones go off in exams then they're setting in my opinion a dangerous precedent.

    Also don't forget the phone went off. Who's to say that it didn't disrupt the concentration of others in the hall? I might be exaggerating but if someone gets even just slightly distracted by the incident for just 5 minutes then that could very realistically be the difference between one grade and the next, a pass or a fail. Its not fair. Why should others be distracted and lose out because one person couldn't follow a basic rule?

    Like I said before, if you break a rule which has no doubt been ingrained in to each and every one of us since GCSE which is so simple and easy to follow then you really have no leg to stand on. Its irresponsible.
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    (Original post by stirkee)
    Calm down mate.

    The point is that the OP was caught with a banned item on them. The rule is, as I said, very clear and is there for a reason.

    Arrogant, snobby examiners? Are you kidding me? So should they change the rule to no phones allowed unless you're stressed and forget its on you in which case don't worry about it? Don't be silly.

    Its worth everything to the examiner. They need to show that there is absolute integrity in their exams. If potential cheaters are getting away and they're effectively saying that actually its fine if mobile phones go off in exams then they're setting in my opinion a dangerous precedent.

    Also don't forget the phone went off. Who's to say that it didn't disrupt the concentration of others in the hall? I might be exaggerating but if someone gets even just slightly distracted by the incident for just 5 minutes then that could very realistically be the difference between one grade and the next, a pass or a fail. Its not fair. Why should others be distracted and lose out because one person couldn't follow a basic rule?

    Like I said before, if you break a rule which has no doubt been ingrained in to each and every one of us since GCSE which is so simple and easy to follow then you really have no leg to stand on. Its irresponsible.
    I understand that it's a distraction. But it's already happened. What's voiding her exam going to do? I doubt the people that got slightly distracted from the phone want her to get banned from all exams and to fail her course because it distracted them for 10 seconds of their exam, and if they do, they are extremely self centred. Two wrongs don't make a right.

    I understand that rules need to be enforced for them to have any validity but in certain cases common sense should be used. OP WAS NOT A CHEAT.
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    No, it isn't self centered at all. It's a matter of principle - Bring in, to a sterile environment where exams are taking place a device which has connectivity and digital storage capacity and be disqualified. How is that wrong?

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    (Original post by Luiswright31)
    I understand that it's a distraction. But it's already happened. What's voiding her exam going to do? I doubt the people that got slightly distracted from the phone want her to get banned from all exams and to fail her course because it distracted them for 10 seconds of their exam, and if they do, they are extremely self centred. Two wrongs don't make a right.

    I understand that rules need to be enforced for them to have any validity but in certain cases common sense should be used. OP WAS NOT A CHEAT.
    What? That's such a silly point. Its like saying nah that guy shouldn't go to prison because he's already committed the crime (its extreme to compare this to an actual crime, granted, but the point still stands).

    Like I said before, they cannot let people who break the rules "go free" because it sets the wrong precedent. If they don't punish the OP then its saying to everyone else who ever takes an exam at this university that its fine to break the rules, nothing will happen. Sometimes its harsh but examples have to be made to maintain the integrity of the exams process going forwards.

    And like said above, how on earth is that self centred? You say 10 seconds but its a very real possibility that a distraction such as this could cost someone a grade, or a pass, therefore a job.. etc. Yes it seems harsh for this person to be punished as I don't believe they were intending to cheat but that's not the point.
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    Okay, so you're sitting an exam and you get put off for 10 seconds, and you would want the person who's phone went off to fail all the exams because of it. Yes THAT IS SELF CENTRED. So what you lost a couple of marks, does that mean you want the person who inadvertedly caused you to lose them marks to be BANNED and have their education ruined, for an accident? It's your own fault if you get side tracked by a slight alarm in the exam hall, where I go to a school they have a loud fan blasting throughout my whole exams, can't even hear myself think. As if a phone going off would make you lose marks smh.

    Your example is awful. A better example would be getting put in prison for leaving your driving licence at home whilst driving. It's against the law, but it's a simple, honest mistake, and whilst it's against the rules, common sense would say that it's not worth severely punishing.
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    Speak to your lecturers and tell them what happend.
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    I don't understand how this happens to people, like I check my phone at least 7 times before I put it into my bag, and then I leave my headphones in just incase
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    (Original post by Luiswright31)
    Okay, so you're sitting an exam and you get put off for 10 seconds, and you would want the person who's phone went off to fail all the exams because of it. Yes THAT IS SELF CENTRED. So what you lost a couple of marks, does that mean you want the person who inadvertedly caused you to lose them marks to be BANNED and have their education ruined, for an accident? It's your own fault if you get side tracked by a slight alarm in the exam hall, where I go to a school they have a loud fan blasting throughout my whole exams, can't even hear myself think. As if a phone going off would make you lose marks smh.

    Your example is awful. A better example would be getting put in prison for leaving your driving licence at home whilst driving. It's against the law, but it's a simple, honest mistake, and whilst it's against the rules, common sense would say that it's not worth severely punishing.
    You really need to calm down.

    Where have I said that people who may have got distracted would want the OP to be punished? Particularly, where did i say that they'd want them to be "BANNED" and "fail all exams"? I feel you're misreading what I'm typing?

    The punishment process is absolutely nothing to do with the other people sat in that exam hall. Whether they were distracted or not, whether they want the OP to be punished or not, whether they give a single **** about the whole situation or not it is down to the University, and as I have said multiple times (seriously, feel free to read my posts- you'll see I have) they cannot afford to set the wrong precedent in situations like this. Its the harsh reality in my opinion.

    I don't why you're shaking your head about the fact that a phone going off could cause people to lose marks- of course it could. I find it very odd that you are shaking your head at that thought but not at the irresponsible OP who despite no doubt being given multiple warnings on the day of the exam and possessing years of experience in exam etiquette could make such a silly error. The only person here who has done something wrong is the OP, no-one else. If they are punished for breaking a rule- and harsh or not a rule has been broken- then they can have no complaints about any punishment forthcoming.

    As for your second point, I did say it was an extreme example so thank you for repeating me. Also as far as I am aware it is not against the law to leave your driving licence at home when driving; if the police stop you and request to see it you are given a few days to present it at a police station. Also your example is equally as bad and if not worse given leaving your driving license at home does not affect anyone else (and indeed as established isn't even against the rules as you put it), where having a mobile on you offers you the potential to undermine the whole examination system by cheating. Not to mention when the phone goes off it absolutely affects the people around you, and also that its downright just against the rules :P.
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    Firstly, you don't need to carry your license with you whilst driving in the UK, so your example is equally as bad from a legal perspective.

    Rules are rules, regardless if someone was distracted or not, having a device capable of connectivity and digital storage is against the Joint Council for Qualifications code of conduct for examinations and most likely also against all university examination rules.

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    Nice to see the stage 3/4 'rules-are-always-right' mentality plaguing this post.

    Option A:

    The university inflicts full punishment on OP, destroying their education and hopes of a decent career. Nobody benefits. Any pupils that were distracted are unaffected; the University loses respect from OP (and others); OP is in huge amounts of debt with shoddy career aspirations - and that will, of course, impact society (low-skilled workforce, welfare dependence, etc.).

    On the other hand, if OP was intending to cheat, this could deter him from doing so in the future. At the very least, he will be more vigilant about adhering to the rules in the future.

    Option B:

    OP goes unpunished. The university recognises that this was an honest mistake and dismisses it. OP is taught nothing about the importance of exam etiquette, and other students may take advantage of the leniency being displayed, potentially increasing the incidence of cheating.

    Option C:

    Everyone puts this aside this holier-than-thou bull**** and realises that bringing a punishment, usually reserved for cheaters, upon somebody who has made an honest mistake, is unproductive and does far more harm than good.


    OP, hopefully your Uni will understand your situation and be somewhat lenient. Personally, I believe an appropriate punishment would be a fine or some form of compulsory, additional course work. In doing so, you are far less likely to make this mistake again, potential cheaters are deterred, and your career is not jeopardised as a result of people giving more value to a set of rules than to you.
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    Why would the university lose respect for enforcing the rules of an examination?
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    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    Why would the university lose respect for enforcing the rules of an examination?
    Because punishing an honest mistake to the same lengths as punishing a cheater is petty and unreasonable.

    Take the example of homicide. You either commit manslaughter or commit murder. I don't know about you but I would lose a hell of a lot of respect for the English legal system if a manslaughterer (is that a word?) received the same sentence as a murderer.

    I'm not saying don't punish him, just that the Uni shouldn't act in a way that undermines the students' and the public's respect for them. Sometimes rules need to be altered to fit a different situation.
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    In all fairness, if the invigilator suspected anything untoward then he or she might have asked you to surrender your phone for investigation or inspection. You should refer to your universities rules and regulations but that must be interpreted with misconduct which gives you some kind of advantage. If they don't suspect that you have had any advantage then I am doubtful that in the circumstances you mention that the phone ringing by mistake is going to have any impact on your examination result. But your best bet is to read any policies or regulations which are available to you.

    I am sure you are not the first or the last to have made that mistake and as long as there is nothing to suspect cheating or advantage then I can't foresee major problems for you. Of course, that is just my opinion.
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    (Original post by chloebooth)
    Because punishing an honest mistake to the same lengths as punishing a cheater is petty and unreasonable.

    Take the example of homicide. You either commit manslaughter or commit murder. I don't know about you but I would lose a hell of a lot of respect for the English legal system if a manslaughterer (is that a word?) received the same sentence as a murderer.

    I'm not saying don't punish him, just that the Uni shouldn't act in a way that undermines the students' and the public's respect for them. Sometimes rules need to be altered to fit a different situation.
    Proportionality - the punishment (if any) must fit the crime (if any).
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    (Original post by chloebooth)
    Because punishing an honest mistake to the same lengths as punishing a cheater is petty and unreasonable.

    Take the example of homicide. You either commit manslaughter or commit murder. I don't know about you but I would lose a hell of a lot of respect for the English legal system if a manslaughterer (is that a word?) received the same sentence as a murderer.

    I'm not saying don't punish him, just that the Uni shouldn't act in a way that undermines the students' and the public's respect for them. Sometimes rules need to be altered to fit a different situation.
    Is there any reason you think the Uni will act disporportionately? People have already said she will get some sort of warning (pointless) or maube a fine or maybe just a telling off. I cant see it being any worse. Someone caught with data on their phone would be disqualifed not just from the exam but probably kicked out of Uni.
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    That's what I said in my original post. What I meant by manslaughter/murder comparison is that the Uni will lose respect if the punishment is disproportionate. I definitely think OP should be punished, if only to make them more vigilant next time.
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    People saying that someone's phone making a noise in their exam could be the other students' difference between a pass or fail seriously need to get a grip or practice concentrating more. That's basically the same as me failing an exam and blaming it on the wrong type of pen I was using, someone coughing, the sounds of paper rustling, students/invigilators coming in and out of the exam hall, etc.

    Honestly, I'm not sure what will happen. The head teacher at my school always says that a student at our school's phone started ringing and he wasn't allowed to do the rest of his exams. But, different exam boards, different levels, in different countries, etc and my teacher was most likely making it up to frighten us from bringing our phones into exams.
 
 
 
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