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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    No it is not, most of the people who have signed it are from the places that supported staying especially London.
    (Original post by The_Opinion)
    How on earth did you reach that conclusion?
    Clearly you haven't been on Facebook or Twitter. Millions who voted out regretted their decision
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    (Original post by The_Opinion)
    On the whole should be focused on, and on the whole, it is doing fine, don't just focus on the prices of the last few days, zoom out, compare it to a few months ago, it is the same, nothing to worry about at all.
    Standard Life (a UK/EU) earning stock is not, it is at its lowest point in the last year and is back at its 2012 price.

    Forget the FTSE100, it is crammed with companies like Shell, BP, HSBC whose earnings are worldwide not UK/EU generated, strip these out (and Shell is the single biggest company by market cap in the FTSE100 ) and the drop is far heavier, the companies with more non UK/EU earnings are masking the picture of the impact on UK/EU dependent companies.

    Remember that the index is market cap weighted, those bigger companies contribute more to the index movement than their smaller brethren.

    Have a look at say Barratt, a UK housebuilder, they dropped 23.84%, here is a link, check for yourself the spread of changes and ask yourself why some companies moved much more than others, it is because their earnings are UK/EU based and the markets are very worried re earnings sustainability.


    http://www.londonstockexchange.com/e...html?index=UKX
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    Clearly you haven't been on Facebook or Twitter. Millions who voted out regretted their decision

    Lie. You have absolutely no evidence to back up your claim.
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    Standard Life (a UK/EU) earning stock is not, it is at its lowest point in the last year and is back at its 2012 price.

    Forget the FTSE100, it is crammed with companies like Shell, BP, HSBC whose earnings are worldwide not UK/EU generated, strip these out (and Shell is the single biggest company by market cap in the FTSE100 ) and the drop is far heavier, the companies with more non UK/EU earnings are masking the picture of the impact on UK/EU dependent companies.

    Remember that the index is market cap weighted, those bigger companies contribute more to the index movement than their smaller brethren.

    Have a look at say Barratt, a UK housebuilder, they dropped 23.84%, here is a link, check for yourself the spread of changes and ask yourself why some companies moved much more than others, it is because their earnings are UK/EU based and the markets are very worried re earnings sustainability.


    http://www.londonstockexchange.com/e...html?index=UKX

    And give it a few weeks and those house builders and banks will creep up, perhaps not to the same price as before the referendum, but certainly not at the levels they are at now. Relax.
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    Clearly you haven't been on Facebook or Twitter. Millions who voted out regretted their decision
    I have been on both.
    Proof?
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    I have been on both.
    Proof?
    It should be common sense
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    It should be common sense
    It should be common sense that your false narrative is true?
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    Which exam board were you with for GCSE maths?

    State 2 things wrong with that.

    1.) sample not representative of the whole population
    2.) ...
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    (Original post by The_Opinion)
    And give it a few weeks and those house builders and banks will creep up, perhaps not to the same price as before the referendum, but certainly not at the levels they are at now. Relax.
    Given an information void as everyone downs tools to select a new leader, not quite so sanguine, markets hate uncertainty, even having bad news is better than no news, apart from those timing the bounces I see little appetite for heavy investment in UK/EU targeted shares/funds and as yet see little in the way of support for EU/UK facing equities, I more see a flight to safety , e.g. look on the list at BAT, the bell weather safety stock, look at Rangold, the commodity of choice in a fearful market.

    However I at least bailed out most of my UK/EU facing stocks and went for cash / overseas earnings before Thursday, I have not really lost anything yet, but all the private pensions of millions of people who invest passively and do not manage their own savings/funds likely took a hit and if they say are fast approaching retirement then this "don't worry" may have cost them dear. That money purchase AVC alongside their main pension, their ISA with some unit trusts, or worst of all their main money purchase pension.

    For the companies themselves share price drops are only an issue if they were intending to issue new shares/offer in takeovers, unless of course they have financial covenants with lenders with the share price as a trigger re technical default, if they do they will just have to hope the lenders are understanding.

    Presume you do not invest your savings directly in the market, maybe you have no savings, it is easy to be sanguine when you have no skin in the game.
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    You call that a poll? 1000 or so? Look at a poll where 2 million + signed the petition, that's a poll you should listen to
    Most of those signatures are from people not in the UK !! Also i doubt mostare even eligable voters !
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    Given an information void as everyone downs tools to select a new leader, not quite so sanguine, markets hate uncertainty, even having bad news is better than no news, apart from those timing the bounces I see little appetite for heavy investment in UK/EU targeted shares/funds and as yet see little in the way of support for EU/UK facing equities, I more see a flight to safety , e.g. look on the list at BAT, the bell weather safety stock, look at Rangold, the commodity of choice in a fearful market.

    However I at least bailed out most of my UK/EU facing stocks and went for cash / overseas earnings before Thursday, I have not really lost anything yet, but all the private pensions of millions of people who invest passively and do not manage their own savings/funds likely took a hit and if they say are fast approaching retirement then this "don't worry" may have cost them dear. That money purchase AVC alongside their main pension, their ISA with some unit trusts, or worst of all their main money purchase pension.

    For the companies themselves share price drops are only an issue if they were intending to issue new shares/offer in takeovers, unless of course they have financial covenants with lenders with the share price as a trigger re technical default, if they do they will just have to hope the lenders are understanding.

    Presume you do not invest your savings directly in the market, maybe you have no savings, it is easy to be sanguine when you have no skin in the game.
    I do have skin in the game, I just look to the future, and what it will be like in 15+ years, I care little what happens in the mean time, unless a huge disaster occurs (which it will not).
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    (Original post by DoctorDC)
    Most of those signatures are from people not in the UK !! Also i doubt mostare even eligable voters !
    You are a complete idiot

    Have you signed a petition before? It asks for your address and email confirmation. It's technically impossible to sign the petition if you live outside the UK
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    You are a complete idiot

    Have you signed a petition before? It asks for your address and email confirmation. It's technically impossible to sign the petition if you live outside the UK
    No you are the idiot. The petition just asks for an e-mail address and a postacode. You also just tick a box saying you are in the UK. Anyone can do that and google a UK postcode ! My friend in Austria did it just out of curiosity !!

    Not to mention below the petition you will see a blue bit that states see statistics. You click on this and you will see the countries of origin of everyone that signed the petition ! The isp origins are logged numbnuts ! Are you telling me 2 million people use ISP blockers !!
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    (Original post by DoctorDC)
    No you are the idiot. The petition just asks for an e-mail address and a postacode. You also just tick a box saying you are in the UK. Anyone can do that and google a UK postcode ! My friend in Austria did it just out of curiosity !!

    Not to mention below the petition you will see a blue bit that states see statistics. You click on this and you will see the countries of origin of everyone that signed the petition ! The isp origins are logged numbnuts ! Are you telling me 2 million people use ISP blockers !!
    Wow you are such an idiot
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    (Original post by Turing)
    We voted to leave based on a clear fundamental decision about the type of country we want to live in. People were fed up with Brussels making decisions about what we can and can't do; the British public wanted full-control and accountability, rather than an EU-superstate.

    Both sides of the debate used the economy as a tool to bolster their argument, but at its root it was purely fundamental. Even if leaving the EU does have a negative impact on the economy (long term), most people who voted Leave would be happy to take that hit because the fundamental decision was so key to them. In other words, they see it as potentially a minor cost for freedom and control.

    A lot of Remain voters cannot seem to grasp this, and it is an indication of why the Labour Party are out of touch with the working class and hence why they got obliterated in the last election.
    Is that why over 60% of Labour voters voted Remain? Is that why the unions all pushed for us to stay in the EU?

    Labour didn't lose the general election because of the EU. They lost because of a seemingly poor leader, the rise of the SNP in Scotland (note how they are also pro-EU) and the complete destruction of the Lib Dems which gave the Conservatives the votes they needed. Labour actually increased their vote share more than the Conservatives in 2015.

    The point about control. I acknowledge it's why many voted leave but you only need to look at the demographics to see that it's mainly the people who don't need to care about finding employment who valued 'control' over the economy. I also said 'many' because it would be naive to imagine that the majority of Leave voters did what they did in the knowledge that there was a significant chance that we might be poorer in the coming years. Phrases like 'net contributor' and '£350 million' gave a false sense of economic security.
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    Is that why over 60% of Labour voters voted Remain? Is that why the unions all pushed for us to stay in the EU?

    Labour didn't lose the general election because of the EU. They lost because of a seemingly poor leader, the rise of the SNP in Scotland (note how they are also pro-EU) and the complete destruction of the Lib Dems which gave the Conservatives the votes they needed. Labour actually increased their vote share more than the Conservatives in 2015.

    The point about control. I acknowledge it's why many voted leave but you only need to look at the demographics to see that it's mainly the people who don't need to care about finding employment who valued 'control' over the economy. I also said 'many' because it would be naive to imagine that the majority of Leave voters did what they did in the knowledge that there was a significant chance that we might be poorer in the coming years. Phrases like 'net contributor' and '£350 million' gave a false sense of economic security.
    60% is a very low figure for a party that is adamant on staying in the EU. Furthermore, a significant proportion of the Labour Party voters are students and young people, who overwhelmingly voted to Remain. Therefore the 60% figure you presented is skewed when considering only the working class voters of the Labour Party. I am from a working-class background in the North of England, and all of my family and friends have voted Labour for all of their life, but they switched to UKIP in the general election and voted Leave in this referendum because Labour did not want to talk about immigration; they wanted to sweep it under the rug and ignore the concerns of the backbone of their party.

    As for the general election, I thought Ed Miliband was a very good leader, much better than Corbyn who has divided the party massively. In my original post I asserted that it is 'an indication', not the sole reason, and hence of course the rise of SNP was a major factor.

    Most Leave voters will be confident that we can negotiate lucrative trade deals, and thus have a successful economy, but this referendum was never an economic debate; even the staunchest Leave voters have to admit there is an economic risk. As you pointed out, the Leave campaign used the £350m figure, but this was not the main part of their campaign. The EU referendum was a debate on fundamentals and the majority of the British public decided they wanted to take back control.
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    (Original post by Turing)
    60% is a very low figure for a party that is adamant on staying in the EU. Furthermore, a significant proportion of the Labour Party voters are students and young people, who overwhelmingly voted to Remain. Therefore the 60% figure you presented is skewed when considering only the working class voters of the Labour Party. I am from a working-class background in the North of England, and all of my family and friends have voted Labour for all of their life, but they switched to UKIP in the general election and voted Leave in this referendum because Labour did not want to talk about immigration; they wanted to sweep it under the rug and ignore the concerns of the backbone of their party.

    As for the general election, I thought Ed Miliband was a very good leader, much better than Corbyn who has divided the party massively. In my original post I asserted that it is 'an indication', not the sole reason, and hence of course the rise of SNP was a major factor.

    Most Leave voters will be confident that we can negotiate lucrative trade deals, and thus have a successful economy, but this referendum was never an economic debate; even the staunchest Leave voters have to admit there is an economic risk. As you pointed out, the Leave campaign used the £350m figure, but this was not the main part of their campaign. The EU referendum was a debate on fundamentals and the majority of the British public decided they wanted to take back control.
    Can I ask why the working class would want to leave? We might be going around in circles here but you would think that it would be the poorest who care more about the economy and less about sovereignty. They have the most to lose in economic downturns. The only explanation I can come up with is that the EU has been scapegoated for the failures of consecutive British governments to reduce income inequality.

    Also on Labour leadership, I agree that Miliband was a good leader. However, the general feeling in the run up to the general election was that he wasn't fit to be prime minister, at least compared to Cameron. Corbyn has been terrible for the Labour party and needs to go immediately, which might actually happen seeing the news this morning.
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    (Original post by Manchester_123)
    Wow you are such an idiot
    It is safe to say that you should not even attempt to argue with a person who can't even spell "eligible".
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    (Original post by The_Opinion)
    I do have skin in the game, I just look to the future, and what it will be like in 15+ years, I care little what happens in the mean time, unless a huge disaster occurs (which it will not).
    What do you do that is changed by Brexit?
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    Can I ask why the working class would want to leave?
    Because they want someone to blame for being poor.
 
 
 
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