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    Don't like the idea that some push on here that if you are shy/introverted or "not ready" then you shouldn't move out. I'd probably have classified under those terms before I moved out to university. It is an experience that will probably end up changing you for the better, as staying within the comforts of your home is going to do very little to change you. It is actually probably the opposite that I would suggest, if you are extremely independent and an outgoing person then you would face less of the problems/disadvantages associated with not moving out.
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    Don't do it.*
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    (Original post by scientific222)
    Don't like the idea that some push on here that if you are shy/introverted or "not ready" then you shouldn't move out. I'd probably have classified under those terms before I moved out to university. It is an experience that will probably end up changing you for the better, as staying within the comforts of your home is going to do very little to change you. It is actually probably the opposite that I would suggest, if you are extremely independent and an outgoing person then you would face less of the problems/disadvantages associated with not moving out.
    1000000 x this*
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    I'm quite tired of this proposition that university life is any different to real life. Living in ghetto squattings, struggling with money and eating poor food. There is nothing special about university.
    It's about independence, and I'm not sure what kind of generalisation you've made. I don't live in a 'ghetto squatting'. I don't even know what that is, and If you learn to budget efficiently, you will not struggle with money although eating baked beans out a tin is a great lesson.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    It's about independence, and I'm not sure what kind of generalisation you've made. I don't live in a 'ghetto squatting'. I don't even know what that is, and If you learn to budget efficiently, you will not struggle with money although eating baked beans out a tin is a great lesson.
    Torally agree*
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    I don't think that it is such a bad idea, that is what I am planning to do this September. I have seen plenty of similar threads on TSR and most users say that you will miss out. But I think that it is important for you to do what you feel comfortable with. I live in London, as there are no campus universities in London (as far as I am aware of), it will be similar to living at home because of the long tube journeys. Also, accommodation is expensive and I want to save money where possible. Living at home does not mean that you cannot be independent. Also, with regards to not being able to make friends, the situation is similar to when you are going to a school which is very far from your home and all of your friends in that school just live close by to the school. I know how that feels and I was able to survive then so I think that it would be okay now.

    I wish you the best with whatever your choice is! x
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    Even in city universities, like Sheffield which is where I went, moving out will infinitely help you socially and developmentally. In halls, regardless of whether it's a campus uni or city uni, events will be organised at the last minute and people will also decide to go to things last minutes too, resulting in it being a lot more difficult for you to become fully involved with things.

    You will never get true independence living at home as you will always have your family to fall back on as soon as a problem arises. Living away will force you to manage things by yourself, which will serve you well in the future

    *A major point of uni is growing by pushing yourself out of your comfort zone.

    *
    (Original post by CaliforNeema)
    I don't think that it is such a bad idea, that is what I am planning to do this September. I have seen plenty of similar threads on TSR and most users say that you will miss out. But I think that it is important for you to do what you feel comfortable with. I live in London, as there are no campus universities in London (as far as I am aware of), it will be similar to living at home because of the long tube journeys. Also, accommodation is expensive and I want to save money where possible. Living at home does not mean that you cannot be independent. Also, with regards to not being able to make friends, the situation is similar to when you are going to a school which is very far from your home and all of your friends in that school just live close by to the school. I know how that feels and I was able to survive then so I think that it would be okay now.

    I wish you the best with whatever your choice is! x
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    Let me make the initial assumption that you are going to uni to get an education and a degree that you can 'sell' i.e. make a decent living with. This is as opposed to merely party & make friends for 4 years, and then find you cannot get a job with your quals. If that is true, i would ask whether your 'rents consider you an adult, and are willing to leave you alone so you can study - rather than constantly interrupting you and dreaming up 'things' for you to do in place of studying. If you have siblings, consider them too. I'm an only child, and have never learned to study in a boiler factory. Given the temptation of distractions, i find it nearly impossible to study. The only way i got out with a degree in engineering, was living off campus & spending all my out of class time studying at home. PLENTY of my classmates flunked out, trying to 'party, party, party!! It is for only 4 to 6 years, you can almost hold your breath that long. You are spending a lot of time and effort (and money) getting a degree. Even if there were NO expenses involved in your schooling (and there always are), you are losing salary you could have earned, if you had been (for example) waiting tables or sweeping floors, rather than studying. Now, if you pursue a 'salable' degree, engineering say, and land a £60,000+ p.a. job after graduation, you will make back the floor sweeping salary quickly. If, instead you do a course on "The History of Art", you might wish you'd been sweeping floors and saving the money. Good luck!!
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    I think It's a bad idea, university is where you learn to be independent and responsibility (how to adult). Staying at home may not offer you those things as you have your parents who will always bail you out of difficult situations, and give you a false sense of security.

    Also on the fun side of things, whilst your class mates are going out at 10, you'll probably be going home at 10.


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    (Original post by Rabbit20164)
    Let me make the initial assumption that you are going to uni to get an education and a degree that you can 'sell' i.e. make a decent living with. This is as opposed to merely party & make friends for 4 years, and then find you cannot get a job with your quals. If that is true, i would ask whether your 'rents consider you an adult, and are willing to leave you alone so you can study - rather than constantly interrupting you and dreaming up 'things' for you to do in place of studying. If you have siblings, consider them too. I'm an only child, and have never learned to study in a boiler factory. Given the temptation of distractions, i find it nearly impossible to study. The only way i got out with a degree in engineering, was living off campus & spending all my out of class time studying at home. PLENTY of my classmates flunked out, trying to 'party, party, party!! It is for only 4 to 6 years, you can almost hold your breath that long. You are spending a lot of time and effort (and money) getting a degree. Even if there were NO expenses involved in your schooling (and there always are), you are losing salary you could have earned, if you had been (for example) waiting tables or sweeping floors, rather than studying. Now, if you pursue a 'salable' degree, engineering say, and land a £60,000+ p.a. job after graduation, you will make back the floor sweeping salary quickly. If, instead you do a course on "The History of Art", you might wish you'd been sweeping floors and saving the money. Good luck!!
    Why does spending a lot of time partying and making friends mean you cannot get a job with your qualification?
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    (Original post by Rabbit20164)
    Let me make the initial assumption that you are going to uni to get an education and a degree that you can 'sell' i.e. make a decent living with. This is as opposed to merely party & make friends for 4 years, and then find you cannot get a job with your quals. If that is true, i would ask whether your 'rents consider you an adult, and are willing to leave you alone so you can study - rather than constantly interrupting you and dreaming up 'things' for you to do in place of studying. If you have siblings, consider them too. I'm an only child, and have never learned to study in a boiler factory. Given the temptation of distractions, i find it nearly impossible to study. The only way i got out with a degree in engineering, was living off campus & spending all my out of class time studying at home. PLENTY of my classmates flunked out, trying to 'party, party, party!! It is for only 4 to 6 years, you can almost hold your breath that long. You are spending a lot of time and effort (and money) getting a degree. Even if there were NO expenses involved in your schooling (and there always are), you are losing salary you could have earned, if you had been (for example) waiting tables or sweeping floors, rather than studying. Now, if you pursue a 'salable' degree, engineering say, and land a £60,000+ p.a. job after graduation, you will make back the floor sweeping salary quickly. If, instead you do a course on "The History of Art", you might wish you'd been sweeping floors and saving the money. Good luck!!
    You do realise the final degree classification is just a tick in the box? What matters most is getting extra curricular activities and volunteering, which would be a lot easier if one lived away from home*
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    I'm a graduate (x2). I lived away for my 1st degree and at home for my 2nd.

    I just want to say - there is absolutely nothing wrong with living at home and equally there is nothing wrong with moving away. Both have pros and cons and both options depend on your circumstances.

    The "independence" that you get from living in halls of residence is nothing like the independence that you experience as an adult with a job and a place of your own.

    In halls we had a cleaner for all of the communal areas - we just had to keep our rooms tidy ourselves. Much like at home with your parents! We didn't have to take the bins out, hoover the floors, clean the shower etc. We didn't even have to buy loo roll! For those who chose catered accom - they didn't even have to cook for themselves. Literally it was like living in a hotel for them. And "paying bills" was just a matter of our student loan being deducted 2 or 3 times a year.

    As a student you're really not that "independent" living away from home at all. You're in a very safe bubble. In fact you're wholly dependent on the halls staff and loans money. Real independence is paying bills every month, working 35+ hours a week to earn a wage, cooking meals, shopping, washing and ironing your own clothes, cleaning your house from top to bottom etc. Students don't have to do most of that.

    Now if you're using "independence" to mean "you can do what you like in your own space without having your parents around to tell you off" well yes, but you can do that as a student who lives at home too because you're not at home 24/7. And you can do that when you're 21 having saved thousands of pounds by not moving into halls. Just saying.

    Your social life is what you make it - no matter where you live. If you make the effort then there's no reason why living in a different building (your parents house rather than halls) should negatively affect your social life.

    It's really not a big deal where you live - at the end of the day it's just a place to sleep.





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    (Original post by KatieBlogger)
    I'm a graduate (x2). I lived away for my 1st degree and at home for my 2nd.

    I just want to say - there is absolutely nothing wrong with living at home and equally there is nothing wrong with moving away. Both have pros and cons and both options depend on your circumstances.

    The "independence" that you get from living in halls of residence is nothing like the independence that you experience as an adult with a job and a place of your own.

    In halls we had a cleaner for all of the communal areas - we just had to keep our rooms tidy ourselves. Much like at home with your parents! We didn't have to take the bins out, hoover the floors, clean the shower etc. We didn't even have to buy loo roll! For those who chose catered accom - they didn't even have to cook for themselves. Literally it was like living in a hotel for them. And "paying bills" was just a matter of our student loan being deducted 2 or 3 times a year.

    As a student you're really not that "independent" living away from home at all. You're in a very safe bubble. In fact you're wholly dependent on the halls staff and loans money. Real independence is paying bills every month, working 35+ hours a week to earn a wage, cooking meals, shopping, washing and ironing your own clothes, cleaning your house from top to bottom etc. Students don't have to do most of that.

    Now if you're using "independence" to mean "you can do what you like in your own space without having your parents around to tell you off" well yes, but you can do that as a student who lives at home too because you're not at home 24/7. And you can do that when you're 21 having saved thousands of pounds by not moving into halls. Just saying.

    Your social life is what you make it - no matter where you live. If you make the effort then there's no reason why living in a different building (your parents house rather than halls) should negatively affect your social life.

    It's really not a big deal where you live - at the end of the day it's just a place to sleep.





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    Students do have to do most of those things, especially those in self catered halls. They have to ensure their fridge is stocked, they have bathroom things in and that rent is paid on time and in full-difficult for a lot of students who's student finance doesn't cover their rent. Also in second and third years, bills are expected to be paid on top of basic rent.

    Also, the only person who can do your washing is yourself-no one else will do it for you. Same for cleaning your house/flat. In halls, no one will clean your room, and the cleaners will not clean your communal area if is an absolute pig sty.

    Moving out of halls is the perfect way of easing into that independence, as you have to do everything that is expected of someone living by themselves, but there's still that support network if you need it, which the majority of students don't.

    I don't know where you went to uni, but your experience is the most abnormal
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    I'm so glad that I lived away from home. I had the time of my life and met so many people and had so many experiences. So much so that little has replicated it since.

    I think that to get the most out of the uni experience it is well worth living away from home.*
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    I stayed at home for university, and I would do it again! I had so many people telling me that I would be missing out on University life, and wouldn't make friends or have a social life, but that was not the case at all.

    Firstly, you need to think about the type of person that you are; would you enjoy living with other people? Do you mind noisy people, coming in and out of halls at all hours? Do you enjoy drinking/going out? Do you have other friends, who live nearby, staying at home that you could socialise with, also? How strict are you parents about coming home late etc?

    For me, it worked brilliantly, (I'm a home bird to) I made some amazing life-long friends, many who lived at halls so I was able to stay at theirs/go to parties if it pleased me, whilst avoiding the cost, the noise during assignment/exam prep and at times the drama of living with others. As long as you make the effort with others, attend societies and trips, chat in seminars and lectures, you'll be great.

    Ultimately, it is your decision, and it depends on both what you want from university, your personality and preferences, and the reasons that you feel staying at home may suit you best. Don't be swung by the pressure other people put on you to enjoy 'student life', and live in halls. Everybody is different, and your decision should suit you! (After all, you can always move into shared/student accommodation in 2nd or 3rd year!)
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    (Original post by flowerlu)
    I have always been a 'home bird'-I like to stay close to home with my parents/dogs/siblings etc, so I am considering living at home during Uni. The primary reason is that I have a feeling I'll be really, really homesick if I lived in halls. So I was wondering if any of you guys commute? If so, could you tell me what it's like-do you have lots of friends/do you regret it/what are the pros and cons? Thank you!
    I'm looking to go to uni, but I think that from what I've heard from others that I've spoken to you miss out on a lot by living at home and living there is part of the "university experience" but it's up to you.
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    Look at it this way, universities put a lot of support in place for students, there's councillors AND security/handy men on sight.
    IF you didn't move out for uni and moved out when you graduated, you would receive absolutely ZERO support, your boss isn't gonna be like "Hey if you're homesick you can always talk to me or one of the assistant managers! Or one of our councillors!" That obviously doesn't happen, but it would at university. Also, at uni everyones in the same boat, nearly everyone has just moved out for the first time and are feeling anxious and homesick, so you can talk to them about it and help eachother to get through it! But again, it's not like that with a job, chances are everyone at the graduate job would have moved out for uni so they'd have experienced what you'd currently be going through 3/4 YEARS ago so they wouldn't be able to relate or help you as much.
    ALSO, a lot of universities will put all your bills into one; Electric or gas, rent, TV etc so a person who's never had any experience paying bills doesn't have to stress over how or when to pay or worry about being organised which a lot of young ppl struggle with. But obviously if you just moved out indepently, you'd be thrown in at the deep end with no support whatsoever.
 
 
 
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