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Girlfriend of black man shot by police: "All Lives Matter". Watch

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    It's a sad comment on society these days that if your boyfriend is pumped full of bullets next to you the firstthing you do is whack out your phone and video the proceedings.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    If you want to "accept the whole picture" then compare the stats that you have just cited with the percentage of Whites in America with the percentage of Blacks. The number of Blacks killed by the police is still disproportionately high. Not to mention that the cases which provoked protests by the BLM movement all involved unarmed Blacks being killed, as opposed to a case of self-defence.

    I wasn't talking about the movement, I was talking about the lives of Blacks (and pretty much all non-Whites) being devalued. If you can bring me a case of a law abiding White man being shot dead simply for reaching for his licence or the equivalent, I would say that it's just as bad.

    The police in other countries manage to do their jobs without killing hundreds every year. This includes countries with much lower crime rates than America. My African American friends (who are all educated and law abiding citizens) get nervous around the police. I myself would feel very worried for my brothers if I lived there.
    Where is the evidence to say certain lives are devalued? Would we also be right in saying that Black Americans value Black lives more than non-Black? I think so.

    The reason more black men are shot is because black men steer toward the thug life culture. These men are dead due to their own uppity self's, walking round like they own the place with a big chip on their shoulder deciding to act like spoilt brats.
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    Public perception about police racism and brutality towards blacks in the US is based largely on incidents that happen to become popular on social media and in the news.

    When we look at the hard data and meta analyses of civilians killed by police, however, there's a discrepancy. We see plenty (if not more) cases of whites being killed under circumstances that would be considered racist police brutality if they had been black. But we don't hear about these, so they don't shape public opinion. On databases hosted by The Guardian and the Washington Post, for instance, you will almost always find similar cases of unarmed white people being killed the same year (if not the same month) as blacks - but guess who got the major media coverage?

    These stories become more popular because of the percieved racism factor. An unarmed black man killed by a white cop?! That gets clicks, that gets talked about. And it feeds a vicious cycle.

    All lives should matter to us in these cases; not just the black ones.

    What this ends up doing is creating more racial division that fuels conflict. People are getting hurt because of it, and it's the media's fault. BLM and their propaganda aren't helping, either.
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    (Original post by Napp)
    It's a sad comment on society these days that if your boyfriend is pumped full of bullets next to you the firstthing you do is whack out your phone and video the proceedings.
    Without the video, there wouldn't be nearly as much backlash. It's one thing to read what black people have to go through, its another to see it.
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    (Original post by Truths)
    Without the video, there wouldn't be nearly as much backlash. It's one thing to read what black people have to go through, its another to see it.
    Not questioning that, i just find it somewhat crass that as her boyfriends bleeding out having been turned into swiss cheese by the trigger happy cop her first instinct is to whack out the phone and video the thing...
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Public perception about police racism and brutality towards blacks in the US is based largely on incidents that happen to become popular on social media and in the news.

    When we look at the hard data and meta analyses of civilians killed by police, however, there's a discrepancy. We see plenty (if not more) cases of whites being killed under circumstances that would be considered racist police brutality if they had been black. But we don't hear about these, so they don't shape public opinion. On databases hosted by The Guardian and the Washington Post, for instance, you will almost always find similar cases of unarmed white people being killed the same year (if not the same month) as blacks - but guess who got the major media coverage?

    These stories become more popular because of the percieved racism factor. An unarmed black man killed by a white cop?! That gets clicks, that gets talked about. And it feeds a vicious cycle.

    All lives should matter to us in these cases; not just the black ones.

    What this ends up doing is creating more racial division that fuels conflict. People are getting hurt because of it, and it's the media's fault. BLM and their propaganda aren't helping, either.
    Something you clearly don't understand is that the policing issue doesn't start and end with killings. No, they have a history and reputation of constantly abusing their power, using excessive force, draconian citations, racial profiling, discriminatory stop n frisks, harassing black drivers, planting weapons and so on.
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    (Original post by Napp)
    Not questioning that, i just find it somewhat crass that as her boyfriends bleeding out having been turned into swiss cheese by the trigger happy cop her first instinct is to whack out the phone and video the thing...
    I don't see your issue. Do you think she was doing it for Instagram likes? No she was doing it for her own protection. He could have killed her too then and there and then who would have been able to testify against the cop then? Use your brain.
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    (Original post by Truths)
    I don't see your issue. Do you think she was doing it for Instagram likes? No she was doing it for her own protection. He could have killed her too then and there and then who would have been able to testify against the cop then? Use your brain.
    Are you implying the cop instead of simply being trigger happy acually went oh look some black kids there lets put a couple of rounds in them for the hell of it. Do shut up.
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    (Original post by Truths)
    Something you clearly don't understand is that the policing issue doesn't start and end with killings. No, they have a history and reputation of constantly abusing their power, using excessive force, draconian citations, racial profiling, discriminatory stop n frisks, harassing black drivers, planting weapons and so on.
    Which is again based largely on stories that happen to become popular on social media and the news. Not seeing the theme here?

    Again, police are going to have more encounters with blacks due to the crime rate and where they live. And again, we are more likely to hear about police brutality cases involving blacks because of the perceived racism factor. We hear less about white victims when it occurs (there's less outrage, less controversy, nothing about racism to get people riled up, less media clickbait...).
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    (Original post by Napp)
    Are you implying the cop instead of simply being trigger happy acually went oh look some black kids there lets put a couple of rounds in them for the hell of it. Do shut up.
    So you are going to judge her for not taking that risk with someone who killed her boyfriend and father or her child in front of her own kid?
    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Which is again based largely on stories that happen to become popular on social media and the news. Not seeing the theme here?

    Again, police are going to have more encounters with blacks due to the crime rate and where they live. And again, we are more likely to hear about police brutality cases involving blacks because of the perceived racism factor. We hear less about white victims when it occurs (there's less outrage, less controversy, nothing about racism to get people riled up, less media clickbait...).
    Department of Justice report on the Ferguson, Mo. Police Department

    Even relatively routine misconduct by Ferguson police officers can have significant
    consequences for the people whose rights are violated. For example, in the summer of 2012, a32-year-old African-American man sat in his car cooling off after playing basketball in aFerguson public park. An officer pulled up behind the man’s car, blocking him in, anddemanded the man’s Social Security number and identification. Without any cause, the officeraccused the man of being a pedophile, referring to the presence of children in the park, andordered the man out of his car for a pat-down, although the officer had no reason to believe theman was armed.
    Court in 2013. Available data show that, of those actually arrested by FPD only because of anoutstanding municipal warrant, 96% are African American.Our investigation indicates that this disproportionate burden on African Americanscannot be explained by any difference in the rate at which people of different races violate thelaw. Rather, our investigation has revealed that these disparities occur, at least in part, becauseof unlawful bias against and stereotypes about African Americans. We have found substantialevidence of racial bias among police and court staff in Ferguson. For example, we discoveredemails circulated by police supervisors and court staff that stereotype racial minorities ascriminals, including one email that joked about an abortion by an African-American womanbeing a means of crime control.
    Officers used a dog to attack an unarmed 14-year-old black boy and then struck him while he was lying on the ground, all while he was waiting for his friends in an abandoned house. The report concludes that in every dog bite incident reported, the person bitten was black.

    (page 2)
    This documentary evidence of explicit racial bias is consistent with reports from
    community members indicating that some FPD officers use racial epithets in dealing withmembers of the public. We spoke with one African-American man who, in August 2014, had anargument in his apartment to which FPD officers responded, and was immediately pulled out ofthe apartment by force. After telling the officer, “you don’t have a reason to lock me up,” heclaims the officer responded: “N*****, I can find something to lock you up on.” When the manresponded, “good luck with that,” the officer slammed his face into the wall, and after the manfell to the floor, the officer said, “don’t pass out motherf****r because I’m not carrying you tomy car.” Another young man described walking with friends in July 2014 past a group of FPDofficers who shouted racial epithets at them as they passed.
    Notably, on 14 occasions FPD listed the only
    reason for an arrest following a traffic stop as “resisting arrest.” In all 14 of those cases, theperson arrested was black.
    But oh no. It's just a twitter fallacy right?

    I really speaks to your white superiority complex that you feel you can arbitrate what is real and what fiction to the black experience in America, from the comfort of you computer desk in GREAT BRITAIN. The absolute cheek. Meanwhile African Americans are living and breathing this oppression everyday, protesting for their human rights and dignity, and you think they are willing to get batonned and teargassed because a hashtag is trending? I doubt you've ever even stepped foot in America. GTFO.
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    (Original post by Napp)
    It's a sad comment on society these days that if your boyfriend is pumped full of bullets next to you the firstthing you do is whack out your phone and video the proceedings.
    This would be an indictment against all media. Whenever there is a war, the media are there recording the proceedings. The first thing the media think of doing is recording the incident and showing it on TV. We now live in a society where the media has become more and more independent and people take a more proactive role in recording events that might otherwise go unseen.
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    (Original post by Truths)

    Department of Justice report on the Ferguson, Mo. Police Department


    But oh no. It's just a twitter fallacy right?

    I really speaks to your white superiority complex that you feel you can arbitrate what is real and what fiction to the black experience in America, from the comfort of you computer desk in GREAT BRITAIN. The absolute cheek. Meanwhile African Americans are living and breathing this oppression everyday, protesting for their human rights and dignity, and you think they are willing to get batonned and teargassed because a hashtag is trending? I doubt you've ever even stepped foot in America. GTFO.
    I never once denied racism in police departments can exist or has existed in the US. What occurred in Ferguson was unacceptable. However, what I am arguing is that a large part of your perception of police racism and brutality will indeed by dictated by the "Twitter fallacy" and news stories that just happen to become popular.

    An instance of police brutality is simply more likely to go viral if the victim is black -- and you base your perception of the state of US social affairs on these. Your beliefs about police-black relations will have been heavily subjected to half-truths and exaggerations. You need to keep that in mind.

    And I'm in Canada, by the way.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    I never once denied racism in police departments can exist or has existed in the US. What occurred in Ferguson was unacceptable.
    You seem to be projecting. The black community has had an issue with policing long before social media. What planet are you on?

    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    However, what I am arguing is that a large part of your perception of police racism and brutality will indeed by dictated by the "Twitter fallacy" and news stories that just happen to become popular.

    An instance of police brutality is simply more likely to go viral if the victim is black -- and you base your perception of the state of US social affairs on these. Your beliefs about police-black relations will have been heavily subjected to half-truths and exaggerations. You need to keep that in mind.

    And I'm in Canada, by the way.
    Yeh no. I based my perception in living in the US for 5 years. There you go with your white superiority complex again. Canada? And you're trying to tell me about the US and my own experiences. gtfo :lol:
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    If all lives matter, then black people's lives should matter just as much.

    If you mean all lives matter as a contradiction to the black lives matter movement, you are being insensitive. Yes, all lives do matter, but you're using it in a way to play the racism card in a time when black people are being murdered in America so unlawfully. People may use it without fully understanding what a disrespectful statement it is, which is fair, but there's plenty of people on Twitter etc. that are just being plainly insensitive.

    tl;dr, this image:
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    (Original post by Craig1998)
    If all lives matter, then black people's lives should matter just as much.

    If you mean all lives matter as a contradiction to the black lives matter movement, you are being insensitive. Yes, all lives do matter, but you're using it in a way to play the racism card in a time when black people are being murdered in America so unlawfully. People may use it without fully understanding what a disrespectful statement it is, which is fair, but there's plenty of people on Twitter etc. that are just being plainly insensitive.

    tl;dr, this image:
    Except white (and Hispanic) people are being killed by police needlessly or unlawfully just as (if not more) often, yet receive nowhere near the same level of media and social media attention. All Lives Matter came about because black people are dominating almost 100% of the conversation about police brutality despite not even being half of those experiencing it.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Except white (and Hispanic) people are being killed by police needlessly or unlawfully just as (if not more) often, yet receive nowhere near the same level of media and social media attention.
    Did Latinos play dead in silence for hours in the biggest malls in America as a political statement? Did latinos disrupt traffic, occupy highways and landmarks as peaceful protest for their fallen brothers? Did latinos march for hours on end while being attacked with plastic bullets, tear gas in the face of military tanks and fully armed police officers in their own neighbourhood?

    They don't receive the same media attention because they don't fight for it.

    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    All Lives Matter came about because black people are dominating almost 100% of the conversation about police brutality despite not even being half of those experiencing it.
    Why would they be half? They are no where near half of the population. They are disproportionately affected, genius.
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    (Original post by Truths)
    Did Latinos play dead in silence for hours in the biggest malls in America as a political statement? Did latinos disrupt traffic, occupy highways and landmarks as peaceful protest for their fallen brothers? Did latinos march for hours on end while being attacked with plastic bullets, tear gas in the face of military tanks and fully armed police officers in their own neighbourhood?

    They don't receive the same media attention because they don't fight for it.
    What's to stop BLM from fighting for Hispanics and whites too, or from at least acknowledging them? Or do they only care for their own race?

    (Original post by Truths)
    Why would they be half? They are no where near half of the population. They are disproportionately affected, genius.
    Are we going to go back to the conversation about police exposure and local crime rates?

    All of the major stories of people unlawfully (and allegedly unlawfully) killed by police have involved blacks, despite not even close to the majority of these victims in the US. If you want to talk about disproportionality, there you go. And this is influencing public perceptions.

    Regardless, all this time we've been arguing about proportions of people killed, the number of civilians shot and killed unlawfully and/or unarmed by police is a miniscule sample of the general US population to the point of inadequacy. Unarmed black victims of police shootings are just over third of cases in annual sample size that barely exceeds 100. Meanwhile, several thousands of blacks are gunned down (mostly by other blacks) every year. So-called Black Lives Matter don't often talk about them, however.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    What's to stop BLM from fighting for Hispanics and whites too, or from at least acknowledging them? Or do they only care for their own race?
    Nothing is stopping them and nothing has stopped them. They have addressed many white and latino victims.

    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Meanwhile, several thousands of blacks are gunned down (mostly by other blacks) every year. So-called Black Lives Matter don't often talk about them, however.
    Because blacks who kill other black people are brought to justice.
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    Despite having the misfortune of having the sort of parents that named her "Diamond" I quite like this woman and what she has to say. Goes to show that even emotional seemingly uneducated people can be decent and smart.

    I can't say so much for my seemingly educated pseudo intellectual leftist brethren.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Except white (and Hispanic) people are being killed by police needlessly or unlawfully just as (if not more) often, yet receive nowhere near the same level of media and social media attention. All Lives Matter came about because black people are dominating almost 100% of the conversation about police brutality despite not even being half of those experiencing it.
    And it's all about the proportion of black people being killed compared to how many there are, especially given the fact that the police officers who kill/are violent towards black people are white.

    It's more of a case by case scenario as to why they were with police, but it tends to be that black people don't have any weapons/drugs which would require an arrest.
 
 
 
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