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    (Original post by Legendary Quest)
    What sort of test are you talking about? Who's to say the test won't be manipulated in favour of a certain demographic so a small group have a larger say?

    What if someone has, say, autism and struggles with tests but is far more aware than the person who revised for the test even though they don't care about politics?

    Intellect cannot be measured. As many people as possible should be able to have a say, irrespective of whether or not you deem them to be intellectual enough. That's democracy...
    I think a test which is about the referendum should be good enough. What are the main bodies of the EU? or how much money does the UK actually spend on the EU taking into account the money that comes back/How does the EU work?

    for a general election, perhaps they should be tested on the values of the parties in competition? I mean, what they represent, what their plans are, etc..

    It sounds a bit idealistic, but I think it's still better than no test at all.
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    (Original post by Legendary Quest)

    But that's life, isn't it? It's impossible to be completely neutral. But I still do believe it's important we encourage people to think for themselves and to be aware of what's going on around them.
    I actually agree and might have been a little flippant
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    (Original post by Pulse.)
    We would be giving the vote to feotuses if people like you truly had your way. Your only advocating giving the vote to 16 year olds because you know they will vote in a certain manner.

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    Aaaannnnd that pretty much sums it up. If the majority of 16 year olds were conservative voters you can be sure that he wouldnt have wasted a single second of thought on letting them vote.
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    Have you lot ever watched Young Persons' Question Time? I don't think it's possible to watch it and be against raising the voting age if anything.................

    Having said that, if we were to apply standards of discourse to the rest of the population, we'd have about 568 eligible voters.
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    I'm 16, and I have long been interested in political affairs, and how the world's democratic system is changing- one of my biggest interests within politics is that of the educational systems.

    A large number of my friends, ranging from ages 14-17, also have interests in political affairs. Some of them want to vote, some of them don't want to. The ones who want to vote are highly engaged in the world around them, and most of them can pose very strong debates for or against their viewpoint, and are often very philosophical within their ideologies. The ones who don't want to vote are either not particularly interested by politics, or don't want to be part of something so great.

    I don't go to a private school.
    I'm not incredibly rich.
    I don't live in London, nor do I live around London.
    I do not, in any way, consider my viewpoints to be a result of the news outlets, nor do I consider my viewpoints to be a result of propaganda.

    I have formulated my own views, as have the majority of my politically interested friends. I mean, one of them has been researching EU politics since he was 10.

    My mother is 35 [yes, I know. She was a teen mother.], and she has never been interested in politics. She thought Donald Trump was already the president, she thought that Syria was in Italy, and that David Cameron was the leader of the Labour party- who, according to her, were interested entirely in 'pregnant women'.

    Simply put, how can she and her like minded friends deserve a vote in such important political events, yet my peers and I don't?
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    Count me in!
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    (Original post by the bear)
    if you are old enough to be punished for your crimes you are old enough to vote. *
    I'm fairly certain that in the UK under certain circumstances you can be punished from 10 years old, you sure you wanna go down that route?
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    A terrible idea. Teens make most of their decisions using the amygdala, the part of the brain that deals with emotions. As a result, most teens lack the ability to make rational judgments and are very impulsive. You don't start using the prefrontal cortex, the part used in rational decision making until you're at least 20. If anything the voting age should be raised to 21, not lowered to 16. Teens are simply too immature to make important decisions. SciShow explains it nicely here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiduiTq1ei8.
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    I fully reject that idea. True, some are mature. However, the majority are too young and have little experience of the world to make informed choices. Most are too busy sat around Snapchatting all day long playing on their Xbox eating cheetos and drinking mountain dew
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    (Original post by viffer)
    A potential problem with adding something to the curriculum is having it taught by a sandal and sock combo wearing Liberal leftie. That would not be in the best interests of UK plc imho.
    It's perfectly possible to teach people about democratic responsibility, the history of the parties, different political movements, how politicians and parties are voting on different issues etc.. without teachers personal views having to come into it.
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    (Original post by lawlieto)
    I think a test which is about the referendum should be good enough. What are the main bodies of the EU? or how much money does the UK actually spend on the EU taking into account the money that comes back/How does the EU work?

    for a general election, perhaps they should be tested on the values of the parties in competition? I mean, what they represent, what their plans are, etc..

    It sounds a bit idealistic, but I think it's still better than no test at all.
    I think the idea of having to pass a test to earn the vote is a bit controlling and leaves me uncomfortable. To have to complete a standard course on politics and democracy as part of the curriculum though feels reasonable.
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    (Original post by ChrisN)
    It's perfectly possible to teach people about democratic responsibility, the history of the parties, different political movements, how politicians and parties are voting on different issues etc.. without teachers personal views having to come into it.
    Which is why I said "potential". However, on balance, I wouldn't trust the beardies
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I'm 16, and I have long been interested in political affairs, and how the world's democratic system is changing- one of my biggest interests within politics is that of the educational systems.

    A large number of my friends, ranging from ages 14-17, also have interests in political affairs. Some of them want to vote, some of them don't want to. The ones who want to vote are highly engaged in the world around them, and most of them can pose very strong debates for or against their viewpoint, and are often very philosophical within their ideologies. The ones who don't want to vote are either not particularly interested by politics, or don't want to be part of something so great.

    I don't go to a private school.
    I'm not incredibly rich.
    I don't live in London, nor do I live around London.
    I do not, in any way, consider my viewpoints to be a result of the news outlets, nor do I consider my viewpoints to be a result of propaganda.

    I have formulated my own views, as have the majority of my politically interested friends. I mean, one of them has been researching EU politics since he was 10.

    My mother is 35 [yes, I know. She was a teen mother.], and she has never been interested in politics. She thought Donald Trump was already the president, she thought that Syria was in Italy, and that David Cameron was the leader of the Labour party- who, according to her, were interested entirely in 'pregnant women'.

    Simply put, how can she and her like minded friends deserve a vote in such important political events, yet my peers and I don't?
    Great post.
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    (Original post by ChrisN)
    As you turn 16 and 17 you gain the rights to get married, have children, join the army, drive, fly planes, as well as the to go to adult prison.
    You gain the right to get married pending permission from your ADULT parents.
    Join the army, but you are not permitted to go to war until you are 18 and an ADULT.
    Under 18's cannot go to adult prison - https://www.gov.uk/young-people-in-custody/overview
    Pilot License holds the same principle as a driver's license.

    So far all of your information is flawed or wrong?
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    I disagree. Why stop there?

    Why not allow everyone in the UK be allowed to vote, regardless of age.

    I was politically hooked when I was 14. Many I knew were too. Everyone who buys goods & services pays tax (VAT), so why should the very young have no say in their future?
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    (Original post by Galaxie501)
    Absolutely 100% against it. I dont even believe 18 year olds should be able to vote due to a lack of experience and understanding of how the world works. Just look at the great majority of Bernie supporters: College/University educated people with very little understanding of politics and economics - despite their education.

    I know this is not possible, but around 30 seems a good age to make an educated vote.

    Also, whats next, 12 year old vote?
    I think 30 is a bit old, maybe 21 would be more reasonable (if it was to be raised)

    I think this because I am 23 and during the past few weeks and longer leading up to the vote mine and my peer's discussions were dominated by discussing the EU referendum issues.
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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    If this was even a viable option there'd have to be some kind of mandatory political class in school. Seriously, I knew nothing about politics when I was 16.

    Edit: I think there should be anyway. I'm 18 and I'm still incredibly ill informed. Just a little less so because I've decided to read up on things.
    This is the best solution. And, being given the vote could be based on your performance in the politics class, with those consistently below a certain cutoff (like a D) not getting the vote.

    Spoiler:
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    It wouldn't go amiss with older voters either
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I'm fairly certain that in the UK under certain circumstances you can be punished from 10 years old, you sure you wanna go down that route?
    10 year olds have to live at least 70 years with the choices of Brexit.... their steak in the future is huge. *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    10 year olds have to live at least 70 years with the choices of Brexit.... their steak in the future is huge. *
    I hope they like beef then :/
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I hope they like beef then :/
    tartare for now

    :wavey: *
 
 
 
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