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    (Original post by smegsxo)
    I managed to get a C (B,C and U- damn coursework) at AS Biology which was pretty good considering I hated the teachers so I didn't go to most lessons for 3-4 months before the exam and skipped the last lesson before both my exams...not recommended btw!
    Skipped the last class is not recomended? Hahahahah my bio teacher just said revise from the book on the last lesson before exams
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    (Original post by Sacred Ground)
    I thought they did too that's why I was like what's happened here? Lmao
    Did you teacher say anything like did they say sorry ; I imagine it was pretty awkward on results day or did they not turn up lol ?
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    (Original post by timiop2008)
    I was over the moon when I left my local comprehensive (Poynton High) in 2008 with 1A*, 8A's, and 2B's at GCSE level.*I stayed at the same school for sixth form, but in 2010 was absolutely gutted when I only achieved A-Level results of D E U and U (iicr correctly) in Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Maths respectively. In my A2 year at Poynton Sixth Form I was advised (by both the head and deputy-head of the sixth form) to forget about applying to university, because they just wouldn't take my application seriously based on my very poor grades. I went against their advice and applied to university anyway but didn't manage to get onto the degree programme I applied for (BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science) due to getting only DEUU at A2. One university however, Manchester Met, offered me a lifeline in the form of a foundation year on the strength of my GCSE grades. I accepted their offer and this turned out to be a truly life changing decision, for the better. At the start of my foundation year, I talked through my career goals with a great academic support tutor at uni, and he helped me arrange to resit my A-Levels in one year at a different FE college (Stockport College) as an external candidate (undertaking my foundation year concurrently). He also instigated 1-on-1 peer-mentoring with 3rd year undergrad students to help me improve my exam technique. This helped me a lot. I finished the year with 88% in my uni foundation year, and grades A* A* A* A* in my A-Level resits (in the same subjects as last time; Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Maths, with some quite tasty UMS scores too :P). I graduated from MMU in 2014 with a 2:1 in my degree, unfortunately missing a 1st by less than *1%! Still, I'm happy with my 2:1. I worked in retail for a bit before recently securing my first graduate job in a laboratory, which I'm loving so far, and am currently in the process of applying for an employer-sponsored PhD opportunity from 2018.
    Wow thank you so much for sharing this ! I think more students should consider foundation years and they can provide that extra stepping stone towards a degree. Your results are just amazing . I'm so happy for you !!
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    None thus far, but I'm hoping I'll have exceeded expectations on results day. :moon:
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    (Original post by timiop2008)
    I was over the moon when I left my local comprehensive (Poynton High) in 2008 with 1A*, 8A's, and 2B's at GCSE level.*I stayed at the same school for sixth form, but in 2010 was absolutely gutted when I only achieved A-Level results of D E U and U (iicr correctly) in Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Maths respectively. In my A2 year at Poynton Sixth Form I was advised (by both the head and deputy-head of the sixth form) to forget about applying to university, because they just wouldn't take my application seriously based on my very poor grades. I went against their advice and applied to university anyway but didn't manage to get onto the degree programme I applied for (BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science) due to getting only DEUU at A2. One university however, Manchester Met, offered me a lifeline in the form of a foundation year on the strength of my GCSE grades. I accepted their offer and this turned out to be a truly life changing decision, for the better. At the start of my foundation year, I talked through my career goals with a great academic support tutor at uni, and he helped me arrange to resit my A-Levels in one year at a different FE college (Stockport College) as an external candidate (undertaking my foundation year concurrently). He also instigated 1-on-1 peer-mentoring with 3rd year undergrad students to help me improve my exam technique. This helped me a lot. I finished the year with 88% in my uni foundation year, and grades A* A* A* A* in my A-Level resits (in the same subjects as last time; Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Maths, with some quite tasty UMS scores too :P). I graduated from MMU in 2014 with a 2:1 in my degree, unfortunately missing a 1st by less than *1%! Still, I'm happy with my 2:1. I worked in retail for a bit before recently securing my first graduate job in a laboratory, which I'm loving so far, and am currently in the process of applying for an employer-sponsored PhD opportunity from 2018.
    Wow, that's amazing! What do you think caused the poor results the first go around?
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    (Original post by jackien1)
    Wow, that's amazing! What do you think caused the poor results the first go around?
    A mixture of reasons really. I don't like to pass blame (as at the end of the day, I was the one who sat the exams!), however in my view the teaching, although not dreadful as such at my first sixth form college, was a lot better at my second FE college. Although I was technically a HE student during my uni foundation year, as I was still between the ages of 16-19, I was able to make arrangements to attend around half of the A Level lectures at my second FE college, and given notes for the lectures I did not manage to get to, due to the clash with my foundation year lectures.

    I have an analogy which I think sums up the difference in teaching quite well; I remember when my Biology teacher, the head of biology at my first sixth form, announced to the class in our first AS-Level Biology lesson that by the end of the first 2 weeks, she would have a pretty good idea of the approximate grade that each student in the class was likely to achieve. By contrast, at my second FE college, my Chemistry lecturer made a point of saying that each year she (purposefully) never looked at GCSE grades of her new A Level intake, as it was her objective to provide every student with the opportunity to get as many marks as they possibly could at A-Level, and past achievement or favoritism played no role in this.*

    The other reason I did badly the first time was because of what I'll refer to as the 'resit trap'; I did particularly badly in the first (January) AS exams (DEUU), and from that point on was always 'catching up' so to speak, with more like 6 to 10 exams in each sitting, rather than the usual 3 or 4 most student would have. It's just not possible to ace them when you have so many!

    There is another reason too, which eventually meant I ended up getting a significant amount of extra time in examinations. I won't go into great detail about this, as it is quite complex, I'll just say it was recognised, assessed and addressed much more appropriately and sensitively whilst I was at my second FE college/Uni, in comparison to a fruitless 5 minute or so meeting I had on exactly the same issue with the head of sixth form at my first college, where it was brushed over as a non-issue.**

    To me the irony of my A-Level results was that the Sixth Form I achieved DEU (I think?) at has a very good reputation locally, and places are fairly sought after, whereas the institution I achieved A*A*A*A* at (albeit as an external candidate) has an average at best reputation locally, and was even rated by Ofsted as 'inadequate' for the year I was there (2011-2012), Sadly, I believe the A-Level department was recently closed down, and it now focuses purely on vocational courses (which it is better known for).
 
 
 
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