Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2nd2god)
    An A* at gcse is equivilant to a C at A level

    if u took the A level with the same knowledge u needed to get an A* at gcse you should get a C

    im 90% confident thats the link
    And you're 100% wrong :p: For a start, an A* can be 100% or 70% (in some cases). A huge difference there already!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by calcium878)
    And you're 100% wrong :p: For a start, an A* can be 100% or 70% (in some cases). A huge difference there already!
    But ur forgetting somethign called UMS
    u dont need 60% to get a C
    you need like 45% that gets rounded up to 60

    so the link is still there
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2nd2god)
    But ur forgetting somethign called UMS
    u dont need 60% to get a C
    you need like 45% that gets rounded up to 60

    so the link is still there
    I don't see how that works... :s:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2nd2god)
    But ur forgetting somethign called UMS
    u dont need 60% to get a C
    you need like 45% that gets rounded up to 60

    so the link is still there
    How could you say that about Maths or even Science? You could maybe get about 30% on C1 and on the rest get very little because all of it is completely new. It is the same with science where almost all of it is completely new. Then with a subject like history or english where some of the content for some boards and specifications may be similar but the skills needed are completely new to someone who has just taken GCSE.

    Mate you have got to be having a laugh. Why do you think so much work is needed to get an A? To get an E on Maths which is 240 UMS, you need 42 percent overall which is about the same. This is if you take C1-C4 and take M1 and S1. If there was S2 or M2 you would need an even lower raw percentage overall because they are harder. So getting forty percent raw marks in maths would get you an E which I doubt anyone who has studied GCSE Maths really hard and got 100% overall would get, as so much of it is so new to them and they would get a U unless they had studied anything in A-level maths. Looking at the history a-level, in june 2006 you needed around 60% to get a C maybe 57% to get a C overall. So it is pretty much impossible to get a C with just GCSE knowledge.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Hard to get an A at as?
    nar hence about 25% of entrys are one
    for god sake in economics half of it is multiple choice

    I dont share your view that its so hard to get an A in maths
    because in my opinion it was a doss
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    with maths i think C1 is a lot easier if you've done higher tier... its not so much brand new stuff like calculus its like an expansion on what you already know. So a A* in higher tier maths might translate to a D or at the very most a C on C1
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2nd2god)
    Hard to get an A at as?
    nar hence about 25% of entrys are one
    for god sake in economics half of it is multiple choice

    I dont share your view that its so hard to get an A in maths
    because in my opinion it was a doss
    I bet no one on this earth is capable of getting an A with just GCSE knowledge in any subject. I'm not arguing whether it is easy or not, I'm making the point that an A* at GCSE won't give you anything above a U in most subjects. You obviously have General Studies which people don't study for and manage As but more people get below that anyway.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pepe Le Poosh)
    with maths i think C1 is a lot easier if you've done higher tier... its not so much brand new stuff like calculus its like an expansion on what you already know. So a A* in higher tier maths might translate to a D or at the very most a C on C1
    You don't cover differentiation and integration at GCSE unless you do IGCSE. So you would really struggle on C1 but you could work out the sequences stuff but not get method marks without using the formulas. Do you get a mark for using the formula? Actually I don't think you do. Yeah you could probably do the GCSE stuff on your own especially on C1 and a bit on C2 but the rest is pretty much impossible.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2nd2god)
    Hard to get an A at as?
    nar hence about 25% of entrys are one
    for god sake in economics half of it is multiple choice

    I dont share your view that its so hard to get an A in maths
    because in my opinion it was a doss
    I got a strong A in AS Maths but I don't know if I'd have even got a passing grade just with GCSE knowledge...
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mathemagician. Funny?)
    You don't cover differentiation and integration at GCSE unless you do IGCSE. So you would really struggle on C1 but you could work out the sequences stuff but not get method marks without using the formulas. Do you get a mark for using the formula? Actually I don't think you do. Yeah you could probably do the GCSE stuff on your own especially on C1 and a bit on C2 but the rest is pretty much impossible.
    I think my C1 may have been different to yours
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I'd have thought most C1s would be 90% identical.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    put it this way we didn't do differentiation or integration until C2. Our C1 was like co-ordinate geometry, factoring, loads of graphs... i dunno how to describe it really. Lots of algebra as well... but i suppose all A-Level maths is liek that. I'm on OCR MEI if anyone can better describe C1 than i can! lol
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I remember being told in one of my first Politics AS classes that an AS-Level B is about an A* GCSE, but that presumably doesn't go for A2, which is well, a bit harder...

    edit: and I don't think there's as much of a jump in difficulty between GCSE and A-level as some claim, I can distinctly remember my geography teacher whining at the class that the 'jump' was 'really tiny'. Whether that holds true for all subjects is of course, a matter for debate...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threepiecesuit)
    I remember being told in one of my first Politics AS classes that an AS-Level B is about an A* GCSE, but that presumably doesn't go for A2, which is well, a bit harder...

    edit: and I don't think there's as much of a jump in difficulty between GCSE and A-level as some claim, I can distinctly remember my geography teacher whining at the class that the 'jump' was 'really tiny'. Whether that holds true for all subjects is of course, a matter for debate...
    Geography is different apparently. Everyone in the year above says it is exactly the same as GCSE and that it was really easy because all you had to do was the learn the stuff but that may be an exageration. I don't know too much about politics. Is politics similar to history in terms of skills needed to get an A? Do you need to be good at analysis and evaluation to do well like history? Is the content similar?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mathemagician. Funny?)
    Geography is different apparently. Everyone in the year above says it is exactly the same as GCSE and that it was really easy because all you had to do was the learn the stuff but that may be an exageration. I don't know too much about politics. Is politics similar to history in terms of skills needed to get an A? Do you need to be good at analysis and evaluation to do well like history? Is the content similar?
    Yes, Politics is very similar to history really, the only notable differences being you study more abstract topics with a wider time-span usually, and there isn't as much use made of sources.

    edit - and geography is easy as hell, I managed an A at AS with almost no revision, even today I can't believe I got away with it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threepiecesuit)
    Yes, Politics is very similar to history really, the only notable differences being you study more abstract topics with a wider time-span usually, and there isn't as much use made of sources.

    edit - and geography is easy as hell, I managed an A at AS with almost no revision, even today I can't believe I got away with it.
    What did you get in AS politics? If you got a B would you say you put in the same amount of work as you did for GCSE Politics or History? If you got an A, would you say that you put in way more work for that A* at GCSE.

    Is a lot of the AS Politics content different to GCSE? If it is then you obviously can't get a A* and then do Politics AS and get a B because you wouldn't have learn a lot of the content.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    They are completely different qualifications so there is no equivalent.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *Sparkle*)
    They're not comparable at all. I managed an A at History at GCSE and only got an E in AS, to be fair i could have improved dramatically, but I couldn't be bothered. haha
    Exactly.
    Went from A* Chemistry GCSE to a D on my first AS exam. You cannot compare them at all!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by welcome_to_the_jungle)
    They are completely different qualifications so there is no equivalent.
    Exactly. If, after finding out that I got an A in GCSE Maths, I sat an AS Maths paper I hardly think I would have got a C. I would have been lucky to scrape an E! Your GCSE results can be used to predict how well you should do at AS/A Level and that's about it!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathematicalMind)
    An A* at gcse isn't the equivalent to any A/AS grade, but they use your GCSE grades to predict what you might get. I was told it goes down two grades so if you get an A at GCSE Maths you are predicted to get at least a C at A/AS Level Maths. I think I'm right not entirely sure though
    Yip, I was talking to my English teacher for a while today, and was on about predicted grades for applying to Oxford next year, and she showed me her mark book. It had a list of the people in my class and a lower quartile grade (the lowest grade you should achieve given your overall GCSE performance) and a higher quartile (the highest grade that you should get given your GCSE grades.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.