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Why do people here hate Warwick so much? Is it bad? Watch

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    i view warwick as an equal of ICL, LSE and UCL tbh
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    I don't hate Warwick. I'd just find it hard to be intellectually creative in that architectural environment. But that's just me.
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    i view warwick as an equal of ICL, LSE and UCL tbh
    Same
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    (Original post by Assan)
    O_o
    The idea of Warwick is what offends me most
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    I rejected Warwick in favour of Durham physics, and while I realise the reasons for doing so were ultimatley based on imperfect information, vague preconceptions and a lot of irrationality pretty much, like everyone else's university decisions, I couldnt help but feel like Warwick is an extremely depressing, faceless place and that reflected on the students. The open day was miserable, and the students that guided us were lifeless, and the department didnt seem very nice to tell the truth. I got, overall, from it and everyone there an intolerable vibe. Now I dont care about partying, drinking, extreme sociability, but people- if you dont have a soul, if you dont consider it important to create a warm and friendly atmosphere with the people who you will work with in the future, your university colleagues, and to approach your work with an element of passion rather than a constant stiff-upper-lip, you cant and wont be successful in your life. The university's attitude passes down to their students and they make it a lifelong habbit, and when you consider that Warwick becomes very unappealing.

    Now many people will disagree with what Ive said here, but ultimatley in life there are very few reliable things that guide us, so I trust my intuition and the vibes I receive. Thats that.
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    I rejected Warwick in favour of Durham physics, and while I realise the reasons for doing so were ultimatley based on imperfect information, vague preconceptions and a lot of irrationality pretty much, like everyone else's university decisions, I couldnt help but feel like Warwick is an extremely depressing, faceless place and that reflected on the students. The open day was miserable, and the students that guided us were lifeless, and the department didnt seem very nice to tell the truth. I got, overall, from it and everyone there an intolerable vibe. Now I dont care about partying, drinking, extreme sociability, but people- if you dont have a soul, if you dont consider it important to create a warm and friendly atmosphere with the people who you will work with in the future, your university colleagues, and to approach your work with an element of passion rather than a constant stiff-upper-lip, you cant and wont be successful in your life. The university's attitude passes down to their students and they make it a lifelong habbit, and when you consider that Warwick becomes very unappealing.

    Now many people will disagree with what Ive said here, but ultimatley in life there are very few reliable things that guide us, so I trust my intuition and the vibes I receive. Thats that.
    PRSOM. It's seriously an empty shell. I really wasn't exaggerating my post earlier.

    People making comments about graduate prospects don't get it or were to oblivious to notice.
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    (Original post by squish562)
    Well if it's not Oxbridge and lSE/ICL, who cares about prestige? The people who diss Warwick are usually the same guys who think that UCL is prestigious.
    UCL is not prestigious?
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    English students are spoiled. Architecture is a concern? Seriously?

    Then again, I firmed without visiting (overseas student). And I AM going in orderto work. But Warwick also has lots of societies, and there are a lot of ways to get in involved in the local and international community.
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    (Original post by Assan)
    English students are spoiled. Architecture is a concern? Seriously?

    Then again, I firmed without visiting (overseas student). And I AM going in orderto work. But Warwick also has lots of societies, and there are a lot of ways to get in involved in the local and international community.
    You firmed without visiting? Seriously?
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    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    You firmed without visiting? Seriously?
    Applicants from abroad often have to do this. My instinct is that the american did this too, else they're a masochist
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    Warwick grad here giving my 2 cents. Which may be worth more than the 2 cents of some people posting here who have only visited Warwick for a few hours, or not at all. Most people will enjoy any uni they go to anyway.

    1)Firstly I want to clear up a common misconception. Most Warwick students don't live in, or even go to Coventry. On first year they live on campus, which is a great way to start. After that most live in Leamington Spa.

    2) A few people seem to think Warwick is 'soulless.' Everyone I knew at Warwick was involved in sports or societies, and had a great time.Compared to boring male-dominated unis in London and the busy schedules at Oxbridge Warwick is pretty fun. Warwick students are generally very open minded and welcoming, so its not hard to have a good time.

    Yes, if you visit on an open day, the campus isn't as romantic as Oxbridge of as excitingas a big city, but you base your opinion on the 'soul' of uni on it's architecture, you're a moron. Its about the people. Warwick's students are awesome, and less stuck-up than many at other top-10 unis. We do have souls! :P

    3) Warwick is great for careers. If you're interested in finance they have probably the best finance society in the country. Oxbridge and LSE may be a bit better, but by the job application stage the degree onyour CV is just a small part of it. A Wariwck grad with good extra curriculars will better than an Oxford grad with nothing on their CV. I know lots of people who are joining top tier banks and law firms etc. If you graduate with a good Warwick degree you'll find a job. Yes, like at every uni, some Warwick people are obsessed with careers, but that's not a bad thing. Most people aren't.

    So there's the chip off my shoulder.
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    (Original post by OmnipotentOmelette)
    Yes, if you visit on an open day, the campus isn't as romantic as Oxbridge of as excitingas a big city, but you base your opinion on the 'soul' of uni on it's architecture, you're a moron. Its about the people. Warwick's students are awesome, and less stuck-up than many at other top-10 unis. We do have souls! :P
    It's indeed about the people. The open day was awful (see quote below). Everybody I know who has gone, I wouldn't want to spend another 3-4 years with either.

    And it's a well known, studied fact that your environment has a significant impact on your mood and wellbeing. Why is it moronic? The study of architecture is exactly for this -- being symbolic of ideals and conductive of certain moods. Spaces definitely 'feel' different.

    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    I rejected Warwick in favour of Durham physics, and while I realise the reasons for doing so were ultimatley based on imperfect information, vague preconceptions and a lot of irrationality pretty much, like everyone else's university decisions, I couldnt help but feel like Warwick is an extremely depressing, faceless place and that reflected on the students. The open day was miserable, and the students that guided us were lifeless, and the department didnt seem very nice to tell the truth. I got, overall, from it and everyone there an intolerable vibe. Now I dont care about partying, drinking, extreme sociability, but people- if you dont have a soul, if you dont consider it important to create a warm and friendly atmosphere with the people who you will work with in the future, your university colleagues, and to approach your work with an element of passion rather than a constant stiff-upper-lip, you cant and wont be successful in your life. The university's attitude passes down to their students and they make it a lifelong habbit, and when you consider that Warwick becomes very unappealing.

    Now many people will disagree with what Ive said here, but ultimatley in life there are very few reliable things that guide us, so I trust my intuition and the vibes I receive. Thats that.
    This comment reflects my experience too.

    Stockholm's syndrome is the only explanation. OmnipotentOmelette
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    Each to their own. I had a wonderful time with my captors! I just think its a shame that very impressionable 17/18 year olds may miss out an a great experience by reading this thread, so wanted to give an alternative opinion. I had an amazing time at Warwick, made friends for life, and got a top job from it as well. I'm surprised that you had this experience at an open day, I loved mine.
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    (Original post by OmnipotentOmelette)
    Each to their own. I had a wonderful time with my captors! I just think its a shame that very impressionable 17/18 year olds may miss out an a great experience by reading this thread, so wanted to give an alternative opinion. I had an amazing time at Warwick, made friends for life, and got a top job from it as well. I'm surprised that you had this experience at an open day, I loved mine.
    Of course. Don't want people disenfranchised entirely for equally bad reasons as glorifying it -- just want to provide stimuli to look it over themselves.

    That said, I think the vibe they were going for on the open day way low-key and down-to-earth which may suit a lot of people. Just wasn't the right fit for me
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    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    You firmed without visiting? Seriously?
    Yup. As the other poster said, I live overseas so it is what it is. Anyway, this is my second time going to university. Yes, it would be nice to study in a castle with gardens next to a waterfall with harps playing.....but it's university. That's it. I'm sure it'll be fine.
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    My partner goes so I know Warwick even though I don't attend (they don't do my course).
    I know their friends and they are nice but you can tell prestige is too important to them. I think a lot of people forget that a degree will only get you an interview most of the time. But they don't hate Warwick uni.
    I personally wouldn't go because it's too close to my house, plus it is in Coventry. They don't do my course so I couldn't go even if I wanted. Warwick doesn't have a wide variety of courses.
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    I cannot answer the question of the original post. However, I did study maths at Warwick. I've seen a few strange assertions about the quality of respective maths courses which I thought I'd share my thoughts on. Above all, you can't really compare the quality of courses that easily. For the record, most academics don't do this - in fact they do the exact opposite and form collaborative inter-university research groups, including members of 'COWI' and others too.

    Some might point out that international research rankings are slightly lower for Warwick. It doesn't necessarily follow though that they aren't producing as good research as, for instance, ICL. Research is notoriously ranked according to a citation count metric. Martin Hairer, a Warwick mathematician, won the coveted Fields Medal in 2014 for his work on stochastic differential equations. There is no doubt that his work could be groundbreaking and has massive potential for application. Nonetheless, he holds a surprisingly low number of citations on his research (possibly because it's so esoteric and difficult to unpick). By contrast, one of Warwick's statisticians is (or was, since I last checked) the 16th most cited mathematician in the world, simply because his work is so applicable.

    The point is, this is why pure mathematicians suffer in rankings; Warwick is largely constituted by pure mathematicians though, so that means Warwick may suffer in turn in these international rankings somewhat. Be cautious about rankings and always speak to academics from different institutions to get a real sense of the picture.
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    (Original post by Assan)
    Yup. As the other poster said, I live overseas so it is what it is. Anyway, this is my second time going to university. Yes, it would be nice to study in a castle with gardens next to a waterfall with harps playing.....but it's university. That's it. I'm sure it'll be fine.
    There's no escaping the reality that a sterile environment will attract like-minded students who are indifferent to sterile environments, and it's this that shapes the overall experience. But as it's your choice, it'll be fine for you.
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    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    There's no escaping the reality that a sterile environment will attract like-minded students who are indifferent to sterile environments, and it's this that shapes the overall experience. But as it's your choice, it'll be fine for you.
    Or.... People who aren't so pampered as to expect the silver service at 18; who can create their own amusement; and who enter in environment with a view as to how they can enhance their environment, not solely how their environment can enhance them. Who understand that some people in the world walk ten miles barefoot on dirt roads to sit under a tin roof with just a chalkboard and some sand because they want to learn so badly, and that to have a building, with desks, and shelter...much less swimming pools, gyms, and aesthetic experiences is something for which to be grateful.

    But... Tomatoes, tomahtoes.
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    (Original post by Assan)
    Or.... People who aren't so pampered as to expect the silver service at 18; who can create their own amusement; and who enter in environment with a view as to how they can enhance their environment, not solely how their environment can enhance them. Who understand that some people in the world walk ten miles barefoot on dirt roads to sit under a tin roof with just a chalkboard and some sand because they want to learn so badly, and that to have a building, with desks, and shelter...much less swimming pools, gyms, and aesthetic experiences is something for which to be grateful.

    But... Tomatoes, tomahtoes.
    Nope, not offended nor persuaded. I don't associate a dislike of sterile environments with the set of assumptions that you make. Perhaps this debate would be better informed once you've actually been to Warwick.
 
 
 
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