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    (Original post by uwaseem)
    Hey guys!

    Hoping for some advice from current medical students. I got into medicine but I am really worried about the workload and just medical school in general. What advice would you guys give on managing workload and the ways you guys find most effective for studying? Do you also have any tips for starting medical school? Stuff you guys wish you had known before starting?

    Thanks so much in advance <3
    I'm a 5th year medical student at UCL and I hate it. I'm considering leaving university at this stage to pursue my real dreams. I entered medical school because I had the grades and it was supposedly the most challenging prestigious course there is. These are terrible reasons to start medical school. So first of all, be completely 100% sure you want to be a doctor and nothing else. I have to make that clear. You only have one life, make sure this is exactly what you want to do.
    Provided you are definitely sure, dont concern yourself with studying too much in first year, it means **** all. I crammed in my first year and passed in the top decile. The rest of the time was spent going out and making friends. To study effectively at medical school use Anki. I cannot recommend it highly enough. If you use it well itll put you miles ahead of your peers with minimal effort.
    DO NOT copy everything the lecturer is saying in first year and second year. Just sit there and listen if you bother going in. I didn't bother going to lectures and found it works far better, but you work out what works best for you. Use the lecture slides and in the evenings or on a weekend create your anki flashcards but make them short and sweet
    e.g. "Injury to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus leads to what type of language deficit?" ANS- expressive aphasia (Broca's aphasia)DO NOT copy out massive passages of text into your anki cards. Download the phone app and flick through your cards each day, itll hardly feel like working and the material will slip into your long term memory as smooth as iceeee while your colleagues are spending hours of their naive lives in the library making reams of notes. Dam i have so much advice its unreal
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    (Original post by Pantha66)
    I'm a 5th year medical student at UCL and I hate it. I'm considering leaving university at this stage to pursue my real dreams. I entered medical school because I had the grades and it was supposedly the most challenging prestigious course there is. These are terrible reasons to start medical school. So first of all, be completely 100% sure you want to be a doctor and nothing else. I have to make that clear. You only have one life, make sure this is exactly what you want to do.
    Provided you are definitely sure, dont concern yourself with studying too much in first year, it means **** all. I crammed in my first year and passed in the top decile. The rest of the time was spent going out and making friends. To study effectively at medical school use Anki. I cannot recommend it highly enough. If you use it well itll put you miles ahead of your peers with minimal effort.
    DO NOT copy everything the lecturer is saying in first year and second year. Just sit there and listen if you bother going in. I didn't bother going to lectures and found it works far better, but you work out what works best for you. Use the lecture slides and in the evenings or on a weekend create your anki flashcards but make them short and sweet
    e.g. "Injury to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus leads to what type of language deficit?" ANS- expressive aphasia (Broca's aphasia)DO NOT copy out massive passages of text into your anki cards. Download the phone app and flick through your cards each day, itll hardly feel like working and the material will slip into your long term memory as smooth as iceeee while your colleagues are spending hours of their naive lives in the library making reams of notes. Dam i have so much advice its unreal
    I'm so sorry to hear that you aren't happy studying medicine i hope it all works out for you! But dont worry though, being a Dr is literally all i want in life. Thanks so much for the advice i'll definitely use anki! Anything other advice you want to share? Thanks so much💕
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    (Original post by Pantha66)
    I'm a 5th year medical student at UCL and I hate it. I'm considering leaving university at this stage to pursue my real dreams. I entered medical school because I had the grades and it was supposedly the most challenging prestigious course there is. These are terrible reasons to start medical school. So first of all, be completely 100% sure you want to be a doctor and nothing else. I have to make that clear. You only have one life, make sure this is exactly what you want to do.
    Provided you are definitely sure, dont concern yourself with studying too much in first year, it means **** all. I crammed in my first year and passed in the top decile. The rest of the time was spent going out and making friends. To study effectively at medical school use Anki. I cannot recommend it highly enough. If you use it well itll put you miles ahead of your peers with minimal effort.
    DO NOT copy everything the lecturer is saying in first year and second year. Just sit there and listen if you bother going in. I didn't bother going to lectures and found it works far better, but you work out what works best for you. Use the lecture slides and in the evenings or on a weekend create your anki flashcards but make them short and sweet
    e.g. "Injury to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus leads to what type of language deficit?" ANS- expressive aphasia (Broca's aphasia)DO NOT copy out massive passages of text into your anki cards. Download the phone app and flick through your cards each day, itll hardly feel like working and the material will slip into your long term memory as smooth as iceeee while your colleagues are spending hours of their naive lives in the library making reams of notes. Dam i have so much advice its unreal
    Thanks for the advice.
    What about mindmaps? Are they any useful?

    Good luck with your final year!
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    (Original post by theboss1998)
    Thanks for the advice.
    What about mindmaps? Are they any useful?

    Good luck with your final year!
    Its all about how you revise, i personally find constantly doing flashcards and ANKI mundane and boring, so mix things up and do both posters/mind maps and flashcards to keep things interesting. Its also great to put some things down as mind maps and posters that are very visual.


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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    Its all about how you revise, i personally find constantly doing flashcards and ANKI mundane and boring, so mix things up and do both posters/mind maps and flashcards to keep things interesting. Its also great to put some things down as mind maps and posters that are very visual.


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    I see. Thanks a lot!

    I am just trying to find a way of studying properly first and stay on top of my game.
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    (Original post by theboss1998)
    I see. Thanks a lot!

    I am just trying to find a way of studying properly first and stay on top of my game.
    At med school and uni in general you are not going to find the perfect studying technique for you straight away, it took me a good 6 months to know what works best for me to take in the sheer amount of information to pass first year, but i honestly dont know whether that will work in second year. Trial and error is a given and honestly it will really help you perfect great revision techniques.

    Do remember though you only get 1 freshers and 1 year 1, make sure you go to societies and enjoy yourself to!


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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    At med school and uni in general you are not going to find the perfect studying technique for you straight away, it took me a good 6 months to know what works best for me to take in the sheer amount of information to pass first year, but i honestly dont know whether that will work in second year. Trial and error is a given and honestly it will really help you perfect great revision techniques.

    Do remember though you only get 1 freshers and 1 year 1, make sure you go to societies and enjoy yourself to!


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    True! Thank you and enjoy your Med School journey
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    (Original post by theboss1998)
    True! Thank you and enjoy your Med School journey
    Same to you!


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    (Original post by theboss1998)
    Thanks for the advice.
    What about mindmaps? Are they any useful?

    Good luck with your final year!
    As Natalie said, its about how you revise at the end of the day. If you like mindmaps and they help you visualise things then go for it. For me, however, I don't use them. I'm speaking from my clinical years and I find you need something where you can revise on the go when you can. You spend a good amount of time on rotations and spending a lot of time getting colouring pens out and making a fancy mindmap just takes too much time.Unfortunately when you're dealing with such a high volume of information in clinical years, every method of revising will eventually get "Mundane and boring". However I opt for efficiency and anki works best for memory retention, and in medical school thats what counts.
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    (Original post by Pantha66)
    As Natalie said, its about how you revise at the end of the day. If you like mindmaps and they help you visualise things then go for it. For me, however, I don't use them. I'm speaking from my clinical years and I find you need something where you can revise on the go when you can. You spend a good amount of time on rotations and spending a lot of time getting colouring pens out and making a fancy mindmap just takes too much time.Unfortunately when you're dealing with such a high volume of information in clinical years, every method of revising will eventually get "Mundane and boring". However I opt for efficiency and anki works best for memory retention, and in medical school thats what counts.
    I totally agree that for clinical years mindmaps are not going to be the most effective method, but for pre-clinical years it really is great if you like them for visualisation.




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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    I totally agree that for clinical years mindmaps are not going to be the most effective method, but for pre-clinical years it really is great if you like them for visualisation.




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    Yep, agreed. These newbies have a long road until clinical years as it is, so perhaps my advice is a little premature. Nevertheless, I think the most important thing at this stage is for them to realise just how important it is to try and enjoy their first year as much as possible, because things get a lot more serious as time goes on.
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    (Original post by Pantha66)
    Yep, agreed. These newbies have a long road until clinical years as it is, so perhaps my advice is a little premature. Nevertheless, I think the most important thing at this stage is for them to realise just how important it is to try and enjoy their first year as much as possible, because things get a lot more serious as time goes on.
    Couldn't agree more!


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    (Original post by sumeyyatontus)
    Bit late on the thread but.. after missing my AAA HYMS offer with A*AB, I rang up Sheffield who offered me an interview on Tuesday 23rd Aug (they originally rejected me pre-interview) and the next day they offered me a place to start this year!! Wooooop
    Congratulations! May I ask what your stats were? Did you apply to Sheffield in clearing or took a chance? Are most med schools open to considering new applicants once results come out (and if they meet their entry requirements)?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by rekhagm)
    Congratulations! May I ask what your stats were? Did you apply to Sheffield in clearing or took a chance? Are most med schools open to considering new applicants once results come out (and if they meet their entry requirements)?

    Thanks
    Thank you!

    GCSEs 4 A* 5 A 2 B
    A level A*AB
    UKCAT 2660 (665 avg) band 2

    I applied to Sheffield back in October but they rejected me pre-interview. On results day when I didn't get into my firm, I rang up the other universities I applied to and asked them if they could let me in.
    Sheffield said that they could give me an interview for the following Tuesday.
    When they gave me the offer on the Wednesday I applied through clearing.

    Sheffield seemed to be open to everyone as they had so many spaces leftover there were people at my interview who hadn't even applied for Medicine originally.
    However most universities use a waiting list from people who almost got an offer from their interview earlier in the year, to fill in spaces on results day.
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    (Original post by sumeyyatontus)
    Thank you!

    GCSEs 4 A* 5 A 2 B
    A level A*AB
    UKCAT 2660 (665 avg) band 2

    I applied to Sheffield back in October but they rejected me pre-interview. On results day when I didn't get into my firm, I rang up the other universities I applied to and asked them if they could let me in.
    Sheffield said that they could give me an interview for the following Tuesday.
    When they gave me the offer on the Wednesday I applied through clearing.

    Sheffield seemed to be open to everyone as they had so many spaces leftover there were people at my interview who hadn't even applied for Medicine originally.
    However most universities use a waiting list from people who almost got an offer from their interview earlier in the year, to fill in spaces on results day.

    That is really useful information about how Sheffield has dealt with 'spaces' this year. Other med schools have been in clearing, so there is still hope on results day for those who persist! Interesting that you say people were at your interview who hadn't even applied for Medicine originally, as they probably won't have sat the UKCAT!

    Well done to you for using your initiative and securing a place. I hope you have a great time at Sheffield.

    From a mum of a student going into 2nd year medicine in a couple of weeks (not Sheffield) and with a daughter applying next month.
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    (Original post by sumeyyatontus)
    Thank you!

    GCSEs 4 A* 5 A 2 B
    A level A*AB
    UKCAT 2660 (665 avg) band 2

    I applied to Sheffield back in October but they rejected me pre-interview. On results day when I didn't get into my firm, I rang up the other universities I applied to and asked them if they could let me in.
    Sheffield said that they could give me an interview for the following Tuesday.
    When they gave me the offer on the Wednesday I applied through clearing.

    Sheffield seemed to be open to everyone as they had so many spaces leftover there were people at my interview who hadn't even applied for Medicine originally.
    However most universities use a waiting list from people who almost got an offer from their interview earlier in the year, to fill in spaces on results day.
    Thanks. wonderful how it all worked out for you!
 
 
 
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