Turn on thread page Beta

Not driving = leprosy? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I live in London and can drive but don't have a car. It's only very occasionally inconvenient. Nearly all the journeys can be done by public transport without any great inconvenience - the only time I miss it is if I want to go on a camping trip or somethign like that, or recently I've started doing triathlons and it would be good for transporting my bike to a race, but I can usually get a lift wiith someone. For the few journeys a year where a car would be beneficial, I really can't justify the running costs.

    I did however get a scooter a couple of years ago - which I use to get into work, which is an improvement on the trains and is relatively cheap to run. It's also useful for journeys where public transport isn't as good.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ten bob)
    But is every bus dirty and full of smelly people?
    Yes!
    (Original post by ten bob)
    Is every car kitted out with a luxurious interior? Non.
    Mine is! Which is PRECIESELY the reason I choose to be in that environment! If it had an interior as filthy as a bus' floor I wouldnt part with cash for it.

    (Original post by ten bob)
    Of course it's a no brainer when you put it like that. Unless 3am visits to your girlfriend are the norm, what's wrong with public transport?
    Convenience. I want to go somewhere at 2:07 in the afternoon... but the bus only runs every half hour. If I use the car often I can complete my errand AND be home before the bus even arrives.

    (Original post by ten bob)
    You've completely ignored the major advantage of public transport - cost. For most people, buying, owning and running a car is an expensive business.
    If you want luxury in life you must be prepared to pay for it. If cost is an issue get a 1969 mini cooper. Parts are cheap, tax is free and you'll do 35 to the gallon.
    I couldnt give a toss how much my car costs to run. So what it gets 9 miles to the gallon? It gets me where I want to be WHEN i want to be there and I may leave whenever I see fit in a relaxed, comfortable, pleasent environment. I'd have a 1975 Bentley Series 1 if I could afford the £15,000 purchase price.
    What a car costs to run to me is irrelevent. How it goes and how it makes me feel is a LOT more important to me.

    I apriciate cost is an issue for many people, but I wouldnt belittle them for their penchents so I do not expect anything different for mine.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ten bob)
    The classic car industry is a funny one. I'm not particularly a fan of the 'driving as a hobby' ideology, and is partly the reason why I dislike Thatcher's individualist approach to society. There's certainly nothing wrong with using public transport in your twenties.
    Feel free to be a filthy communist all you fancy, but it should be noted that Margaret Thatcher never made the comment to which you refer. It was actually made by one of the wives of the 2nd Duke of Westminster - who was later on rather unfortunately noted following their messy divorce as having been born in St James' Palace and now forced to ride the bus in the rain.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ten bob)
    But is every bus dirty and full of smelly people?
    In my experience, pretty much.

    The last time I was on a bus, whereupon I decided 'never again' is grand at demonstrating my objections. I had to wait for just over forty minutes on this thing coming (desperate to get home) and when I got on it, I noticed there was a horrendous smell coming from the upholstery. I spend the full journey (a long *******ing one out into the country, through numerous unpleasant parts of the world, taking close to an hour when I could've probably driven it in fifteen minutes) sitting on a text book so that my trousers didn't become tainted with the smell. That may not sound terrible, but try it for yourself - an hour sitting on slidey-covered book, not touching the backrest; absolutely awful experience.

    Of course it's a no brainer when you put it like that. Unless 3am visits to your girlfriend are the norm, what's wrong with public transport?
    Because the freedom to act as you please in this fashion goes beyond matters of cost.

    You've completely ignored the major advantage of public transport - cost. For most people, buying, owning and running a car is an expensive business.
    There was an episode of 'Top Gear' once which made a very compelling case to the contrary. They managed to buy, insure, fuel and drive three cars (albeit rather bangerish) from London to Manchester for cheaper than it would've been to buy a train ticket for the same journey.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    Feel free to be a filthy communist all you fancy.
    Funniest thing I've heard all year. Not all opposition to individualism falls under the banner of communism.

    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    The last time I was on a bus, whereupon I decided 'never again' is grand at demonstrating my objections. I had to wait for just over forty minutes on this thing coming (desperate to get home) and when I got on it, I noticed there was a horrendous smell coming from the upholstery. I spend the full journey (a long *******ing one out into the country, through numerous unpleasant parts of the world, taking close to an hour when I could've probably driven it in fifteen minutes) sitting on a text book so that my trousers didn't become tainted with the smell. That may not sound terrible, but try it for yourself - an hour sitting on slidey-covered book, not touching the backrest; absolutely awful experience.
    Aww. I'm sorry you had to undergo such a horiffic experience. There is an excellent public transprt infrastructure where I live, and the conditions you describe are very rare indeed. However, I'm willing to accept that not all places in the UK are lucky enough to experience public transport of the same quality, so perhaps I should let you off with this one.

    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    There was an episode of 'Top Gear' once which made a very compelling case to the contrary. They managed to buy, insure, fuel and drive three cars (albeit rather bangerish) from London to Manchester for cheaper than it would've been to buy a train ticket for the same journey.
    Is this the same Top Gear that tried to send a RR to the moon? Seriously, I wouldn't read too much into the 'experiments' conducted by Clarkson and co. Great show though.

    I've already stated several times that I plan to own a car very soon, and given my reasons for this. I am opposed to excessive and unecessary use - for example the shenanigans of JC. Fortunately, and this may upset you Libertin, we are moving in the oppositie direction. Expect to witness further tax increases on larger and 'one-passenger' vehicles, and agressive increases in other charges in the future.

    The UK's roads are getting busier and busier. Oil is becoming more and more scarce. In 50 years time you might be able to go visit your girlfriend at 3am, but it's going to cost you big time baby!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    well in most cases its virtually handicap if u cant drive. and its not very hard to learn. its sort of like riding a bike. wouldnt u be surpised if someone told u they couldnt ride a bike?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's a bit extreme to say all public transport is full of smelly people. I haven't had any problems with public transport apart from the electric trains on the Wirral line smelling slightly of hospitals.

    People say that it's vital to drive but you just have to accept that not everyone can afford to. Just because you can doesn't mean everyone should have to learn to drive and spend a fortune on a car they can't afford. I wouldn't dream of running to mummy and daddy asking for a car like a lot of people my age seem to have done. I also wouldn't waste my student loan on buying and running a car either.

    Shattermedic - How the buggering hell is learning to drive just like riding a bike?!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Cars are not expensive at all.

    Get something built before 1973 and you dont pay tax.

    Ive just bought a 1985 Austin Metro to add to my fleet. Tax is about £120 a year, cost me £280 to buy with 12 months MOT and is in concourse condition. Insurance will proberbly be ITRO £150 a year.
    So thats a years motoring for less than £600 Call it a grand with petrol for a year.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JC.)
    Cars are not expensive at all.

    Get something built before 1973 and you dont pay tax.

    Ive just bought a 1985 Austin Metro to add to my fleet. Tax is about £120 a year, cost me £280 to buy with 12 months MOT and is in concourse condition. Insurance will proberbly be ITRO £150 a year.
    So thats a years motoring for less than £600 Call it a grand with petrol for a year.
    Don't your rather old cars tend to cost a fair bit in maintenance if something goes wrong with it?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I've always always wanted to drive. I've spent my whole life as a passenger as both my parents have always owned cars.
    I'd been saving for my first car since I was about 13, but have only just acquired enough money to have lessons and buy my own car, at 21 years of age.

    My 25 year old sister doesn't drive, but she would like to, but can't afford to pay rent and have a car. I'm lucky though, as I don't have to pay rent as I live at home, so I can afford £30 for petrol, or £50 if something goes bang.

    I love driving, and once I've passed my test I'll love the freedom of having my own transport and the freedom of being able to go wherever I like, no matter what time of day or night!!

    It also helps having my own transport as I suffer a physical disability, which makes walking and using public transport very difficult. I'm going to Uni in sept, which means I'll be able to commute the 3 days a week in the comfort of my own car.

    There are pro's and con's to being a driver/car owner and it's up to each person to decide which they want to go with. I chose the pro's.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Libertin du Nord)
    Don't your rather old cars tend to cost a fair bit in maintenance if something goes wrong with it?
    Nope. Parts are freely avaliable and cheap. You can rebuild the entire front suspension on an MGB for £200. Rear brake adjusters £6.99 Brake shoes £20? Dizzy cap £10, rotor arm £2
    Heck you can get a whole axle on ebay or mg specialist for £50 if you know where to look.

    If something does go wrong you can always get home as they are so simple. Ive never ever failed to complete a journey.

    Parts avaliability is so good that you can get a whole brand new bodyshell for £5k if you want!

    Anyway, thats beside the point. Cars dont have to be expensive.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't learnt to drive yet and I don't plan to. My mum doesn't drive and we get on perfectly well without a car. I also don't want a car due to the environmental impacts. I do get some strange looks, but my boyfriend and friends understand and they don't go on about it. My boyfriend has tried to introduce me to the 'joys' of driving but it just doesn't appeal to me.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I had no desire to learn but as soon as I turned 17 my parents nudged me into it. It is a great freedom to get in a car and drive to where you want to. Especially when you live in a rural area. I like driving fast.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't bothered to learn yet (I'm 20). I just don't feel the need or urge to. However, this makes several of my friends extremely angry for some reason, to the point where if I spend time doing nothing they will command me to learn to drive with my spare time or express exasperation as if it is an inconveniance to them. It's pretty annoying.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I feel ya.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laika)
    I haven't bothered to learn yet (I'm 20). I just don't feel the need or urge to. However, this makes several of my friends extremely angry for some reason, to the point where if I spend time doing nothing they will command me to learn to drive with my spare time or express exasperation as if it is an inconveniance to them. It's pretty annoying.
    Every time I go to my grandma I get a lecture about why I have to learn to drive. Same with my parents etc. They get really angry that I'm not 'taking the opportunity'.


    WELL FU!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This is why I don't drive...

    Cycling England analysed the carbon commutes of the 6.6 million employees who use cars or buses to travel less than five miles to work, as part of its campaign to promote Bike Week (16-24 June).

    Staggeringly, if each of these target commuters were to cycle during the five working days of Bike Week, they would save over 44,000 tonnes of CO2, pocketing around £61 million in the process through economising on fuel and fare costs.

    A week’s pedal power would save the equivalent carbon generated by more than 102 million kWh of electricity. To put this into perspective, over six million people freewheeling during just one week saves enough CO2 to:

    offset the domestic emissions generated by heating more than 16,700 houses for a year
    balance out the emissions generated by more than 205 million standard light bulbs in just one day
    ill 8,800 hot air balloons

    At the moment, 78 per cent of all commuters drive or are driven to work, generating a weekly CO2 footprint of more than 341,000 tonnes. However, Cycling England predicts that more “carbon-conscious commuters” will begin to consider cycling to work, with many testing out their wheels over Bike Week. 600,000 people already cycle to work, saving a weekly tally of almost 5,250 tonnes.

    More than 6.6 million people make work-based journeys of under five miles, and these short-distance commuters are the target for the government organisation’s new campaign, as their journeys could most easily be switched from car/bus to bicycle, saving them almost £500 a year in the process.

    People driving is killing the environment - check this out!
    www.cyclesolutions.co.uk
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am 25, haven't bothered to go for a test and I have my own car which I pay for entierely (I dont drive it on my own).
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I don't really plan to start driving. I suppose I may have to at some point depending on where I get a job. I could use the excuse that it's better for the environment, but really I'm too lazy to learn. I have legs that work, it's not usually a problem to walk to the nearest bus stop or train station.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Failed a test at 21, didn't bother to try again (and pass) until i took an intensive course recently, at 24.

    Never had trouble getting where i needed to be by other means: legs, bike and public transport etc. It's much cheaper too - i didn't need to be able to drive. I still don't...but i want a car anyway! <£1k annual 'transport costs' are now going to increase to the cost of a car, tax, insurance, maint', petrol etc.
 
 
 
Poll
Should Banksy be put in prison?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.