Advanced Higher Biology 2016/17

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    (Original post by Nuba123)
    Yeah, I do AH chemistry as well. So will have to check both documents. Thanks for letting me know!
    No problem! Like to be helpful
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    (Original post by Labrador99)
    No problem! Like to be helpful
    x
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    Struggling to track down some websites with AH Biology past papers?

    Anyone got any pls?
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    Also, where have you guys covered up to in the course?

    I am in the catching up process now and so am starting at Unit 1, key area 2. Got ALOT to do now!!!


    Hope to catch up on unit 1 in the hols
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    In the course notes it says " Describe the fluid mosaic model of membrane structure"

    What would this require us to describe exactly if that makes sense? Do we just talk about the fluid mosaic model's structure like phospholipid bilayer or anything more as well?
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    (Original post by .......Jeff458)
    In the course notes it says " Describe the fluid mosaic model of membrane structure"

    What would this require us to describe exactly if that makes sense? Do we just talk about the fluid mosaic model's structure like phospholipid bilayer or anything more as well?
    Talk about structure of phospholipid - draw an example chemical structure?

    Talk about how they are arranged as a bilayer, with reference to hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces.

    Talk about what makes this fluid

    Talk about the "mosaic" part - other components e.g. proteins, cholesterol
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Talk about structure of phospholipid - draw an example chemical structure?

    Talk about how they are arranged as a bilayer, with reference to hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces.

    Talk about what makes this fluid

    Talk about the "mosaic" part - other components e.g. proteins, cholesterol
    Hey, thanks very much!

    I came across this in the course notes from the SQA: "Nerve transmission is a wave of depolarisation of the resting potential of a neuron."

    Now, FROM THIS ONLY my teacher says I am expected to define both : 'resting potential' and depolirisation'. However the only possible definition I see is that of a Nerve transmission? Am I correct? Am I missing something. I don't need the actual definitions if they are not from there.
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    (Original post by ........Jeff458)
    Hey, thanks very much!

    I came across this in the course notes from the SQA: "Nerve transmission is a wave of depolarisation of the resting potential of a neuron."

    Now, FROM THIS ONLY my teacher says I am expected to define both : 'resting potential' and depolirisation'. However the only possible definition I see is that of a Nerve transmission? Am I correct? Am I missing something. I don't need the actual definitions if they are not from there.
    You are expected to know what depolraisation and what a resting potential is.

    Basically the nerve cell is at resting potential when it is not firing, so the resting potential is the normal potential difference across the membrane when the nerve cell is at rest.

    When the neruotransmitter/ligand binds to the ligand gated ion channels, and lets Na+ ions in, the cell begins to depolarise i.e become more positive inside the cell as positive ions are flooding in. Normally the cells electrical gradient would be negative inside and positive outside. Eventually when the potential difference across the membranes reaches a point called the threshhold, the VOLTAGE gated ligand channels begin to open and flood the nerve cell with Na+ ions at a faster rate, causing a wave of depolarisation along the nerve cell.

    So basically to answer your Q - depolarisation is when the inside of the cell rises slowly to be more positive than the resting potential and the resting potential is the normal potential difference of the nerve cell at rest when it is not firing/ preparing to fire.
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    (Original post by Zain-A)
    You are expected to know what depolraisation and what a resting potential is.

    Basically the nerve cell is at resting potential when it is not firing, so the resting potential is the normal potential difference across the membrane when the nerve cell is at rest.

    When the neruotransmitter/ligand binds to the ligand gated ion channels, and lets Na+ ions in, the cell begins to depolarise i.e become more positive inside the cell as positive ions are flooding in. Normally the cells electrical gradient would be negative inside and positive outside. Eventually when the potential difference across the membranes reaches a point called the threshhold, the VOLTAGE gated ligand channels begin to open and flood the nerve cell with Na+ ions at a faster rate, causing a wave of depolarisation along the nerve cell.

    So basically to answer your Q - depolarisation is when the inside of the cell rises slowly to be more positive than the resting potential and the resting potential is the normal potential difference of the nerve cell at rest when it is not firing/ preparing to fire.
    Hey,

    thanks a bunch! So then what is the action potential? Is that just a wave of depolarisation?
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    (Original post by Zain-A)
    You are expected to know what depolraisation and what a resting potential is.

    Basically the nerve cell is at resting potential when it is not firing, so the resting potential is the normal potential difference across the membrane when the nerve cell is at rest.

    When the neruotransmitter/ligand binds to the ligand gated ion channels, and lets Na+ ions in, the cell begins to depolarise i.e become more positive inside the cell as positive ions are flooding in. Normally the cells electrical gradient would be negative inside and positive outside. Eventually when the potential difference across the membranes reaches a point called the threshhold, the VOLTAGE gated ligand channels begin to open and flood the nerve cell with Na+ ions at a faster rate, causing a wave of depolarisation along the nerve cell.

    So basically to answer your Q - depolarisation is when the inside of the cell rises slowly to be more positive than the resting potential and the resting potential is the normal potential difference of the nerve cell at rest when it is not firing/ preparing to fire.
    Sorry but one last question:


    I am making flashcards so for the statement given "Nerve transmission is a wave of depolarisation of the resting potential of a neuron,"

    Should the question for the flashcard just be what is a Nerve transmission or I have picked it up wrong?
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    (Original post by .........Jeff458)
    Hey,

    thanks a bunch! So then what is the action potential? Is that just a wave of depolarisation?
    Yes an action potential is a wave of depolarisation that can propagate down an axon of a neuron. This means when one part of a neuron depolarises it triggers the adjacent part to depolarise and so on until the synapse is reached.

    With regards to the flashacrd, it could be something like "describe how nerves transmit information"
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Yes an action potential is a wave of depolarisation that can propagate down an axon of a neuron. This means when one part of a neuron depolarises it triggers the adjacent part to depolarise and so on until the synapse is reached.

    With regards to the flashacrd, it could be something like "describe how nerves transmit information"
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Jeff458(#16))
    Thanks!
    Why do you keep getting banned? What is it you do?
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    (Original post by Zain-A)
    Why do you keep getting banned? What is it you do?
    I was going to ask the same question lol
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    (Original post by Zain-A)
    Why do you keep getting banned? What is it you do?
    Hahaha I don't know!!! I was speaking to someone (nothing bad) and I got banned and I was like da f.
    (Original post by sameehaiqbal)
    I was going to ask the same question lol
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    (Original post by Jeff458(#16))
    Hahaha I don't know!!! I was speaking to someone (nothing bad) and I got banned and I was like da f.
    omg loooool
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    (Original post by Jeff458(#16))
    Hahaha I don't know!!! I was speaking to someone (nothing bad) and I got banned and I was like da f.
    Usual fae Jeff lol
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    Well considering making a new account to get round a ban is a bannable offence...
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    I was wondering if anyone here was well into their projects and if anyone was doing something similar to Catechol Oxidase in apples. Really struggling to get the information I am searching for. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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    (Original post by Bio 7)
    I was wondering if anyone here was well into their projects and if anyone was doing something similar to Catechol Oxidase in apples. Really struggling to get the information I am searching for. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Hi. I am doing the effect of ripeness on catechol oxidase in apples. What are you needing help on?
 
 
 
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