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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    It's very easy to put in a strong performance in a debate when you gave no regard for the truth.
    He was speaking the truth.
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    (Original post by yungaheartz)
    naveed? muslim? no offence but I never thought I'd see the day where a Muslim would call Farage a 'hero'... :rofl:
    They are allowed to think for themselves they aren't just a voting bloc
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    (Original post by retro_turtles)
    I can't trust him on anything since he pretty much lied during his campaign for leave by claiming that £350 million per week would go to funding the NHS, plus so far Brexit hasn't been going well, i don't know much about what it's going to be like in the future.
    Ummm, actually he didn't make that claim, and if it's going so badly nobody is able to tell.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    He [Farage] was a massive hero to UK. He fought the establishment for 20 years to get us a referendum so that we can leave the EU,
    Farage did nothing of the sort. It was Camerons fear of his own back benches that bought on the referendum. As for what it will achieve? There is time for you to be disappointed yet.
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Farage did nothing of the sort. It was Camerons fear of his own back benches that bought on the referendum. As for what it will achieve? There is time for you to be disappointed yet.
    Cameron was fighting for the aforementioned "establishment" and was the visual head of it, further, the backbenches were a lesser matter than the risk of losing even more votes to a certain party, as I recall they were called UKIP and lead by one Mr Farage.

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Ummm, actually he didn't make that claim, and if it's going so badly nobody is able to tell.
    He made zero attempts to correct the record. You can respond by saying it wasn't his place all you want, but if he felt it was misleading and let it slide, he was implicitly not objecting to it.
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    (Original post by Petrue)
    SIGH

    Doesn't mean he has earned my respect
    Debatable.
    Spoiler:
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    Should we wish to continue with our access to the single market (we'd be stupid not to) we will have to enter the EFTA (EEU). If we enter a Norway style agreement with the EU we will have to comply with EU law on: competition policy, social policy, environmental policy, state aid, transport policy, financial services, consumer protection and company law. The only thing that will change is that we won't necessarily have to comply with agricultural policy if we so choose. Switzerland doesn't have it much better: it trades accepting EU laws for greater access to EU markets and organisations but it opens itself up to being strong armed if it rebels e.g. when it voted against the FM of labour and was subsequently barred from Horizon 2020 grants. Being part of the EFTA we would, however, be given a 'right of reservation' so could choose not to implement an EU law.. but the EU can simply suspend part of the agreement in response.

    TL;DR Still have to follow EU laws.
    The EU fishing policy has helped, not harmed British fishing stocks and the UK industry had a very healthy 35% profit margin (€367mn) in 2014 (https://goo.gl/Ey5R2K). Britain will always share its fish as we move into an era of global maritime regulation.


    Not even going to touch that. *pssst* we'll still pay the fee in the EEU.

    Ah, now we come to the interesting part. Our freedom of trade. We'll ignore that the NIESR has said that without deep market access (which will take decades to negotiate) no combination of FTAs will ever be as economically successful as the UK's access to the single market. http://goo.gl/uxjz8l

    China: the Sino-Swiss FTA is a good case study as the composition of the Swiss economy is comparable to our own, only differing in size. Long story short, a three year negotiation period ended "successfully" with China setting next to all terms of trade. It forced Switzerland to accept Chinese goods -tariff free- immediately while providing itself up to 15 years to do the same with Swiss goods. The agreement also does not cover the trade of financial services nor the car industry, two major sectors in the British economy.

    Not to mention we'd be opening up our manufacturing industry to international competition it's never face before. We won't see a boon to our industrial sector as we force British firms to compete against countries that regularly breach labour laws and aggressively compete wages downwards.

    Australia and New Zealand: yay commonwealth, right? Not really. The only products Australia and NZ export are either drilled out of the ground or shaved off of animals, and the scale of their markets is tiny. They're not suitable (in size or composition) replacements for EU markets.

    India: India is the single most regulated market in the world (will try to find source, I can't remember exactly where I read it). Historically India has fought tooth and nail to protect its domestic industries which does not bode well for our scrappy British exporters.

    America: TTIP will probably be accepted by the EU at some point within the next decade so we'd have gotten our FTA without having to sh*t our collective bed.

    Japan: I will agree that trade will be better with Japan. But the EU just entered its 16th round of negotiations with Japan.. so we've got some catching up to do.

    Most importantly, any trade partners that Britain can woo into bed will want to understand the EU-UK relationship first as to not infringe upon their own EU trade. And as we can't give them that information until someone pushes the Article 50 button the whole situation, we're stuck. It's all rather more complicated than turning up and saying, do you want some X, sign here please.
    Phenomenal post. Can I take you with me?

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    (Original post by HelpusPleasus)
    Remind me, what was he before he became a politician? Oh Wait a Banker.
    Not really, he was a commodities trader.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Phenomenal post. Can I take you with me?
    Sure thing. Where we going?
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    It makes me sad that not many people in society give respect to Nigel Farage.

    He was a massive hero to UK. He fought the establishment for 20 years to get us a referendum so that we can leave the EU, take back control of our laws, take back control of our fishing, save £12 billion a year so that we can spend some of it on the NHS and be able to have the freedom to trade with countries like Australia, China, Japan, America, India, Qatar, New Zealand, etc etc.
    That's all completely true.

    Except that we never didn't have control of our laws. All EU laws have to go through the UK Parliament for approval.

    Oh and we have no chance of 'taking control of our fishing' since the government won't pay the money to protect our fisheries properly and show no signs of being willing to do so.

    Oh yes and it won't be £12bn a year unless we leave the Single Market altogether, which would be completely disastrous and see unemployment surge to the 5m+ range.

    And we were never not free to trade with the countries you list and we do anyway.

    Apart from that, all very true. :holmes:
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    Completely agree with your post but I have one correction:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    And we were never not free to trade with the countries you list and we do anyway.
    I believe OP was speaking of negotiating free trade agreements with the aforementioned countries, not just trading in general. Being part of the EU meant we couldn't negotiate FTAs individually with those nations and had to rely on the EU, as a whole, to negotiate for us.

    Other than that (and possibly the unemployment figure) I agree!
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    Absolute scumbag. Glad he stepped down so UKIP will fall apart and burn.
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    Nigel Farage was the man who challenged and confronted a war criminal called Tony Blair.
    Nigel Farage was the man who confronted Tony Blair for giving away UK's £7 billion over seven years and cutting UK's rebate from EU by 7%.

    Nigel Farage was the man who stood up for the British people:

    "Why should British taxpayers pay for new sewers in Budapest, and for a new underground system in Warsaw when our own public services are crumbling in London??" -Nigel Farage

    Tony Blair did quite alot of economic damage to the UK but Nigel Farage was the man who confronted him.

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    (Original post by HelpusPleasus)
    Remind me, what was he before he became a politician? Oh Wait a Banker.
    Oh Wait.....Why can remainers just make cliche smears that are lame anyway, and be repped for it, when they have no basis in fact?

    It's because their bitter friends in the echo chamber, who know there are not many arguments left for remain, will rep any lame smear.

    He never worked as a banker, or a stockbroker.

    And wealth is not the indicator of being tied to establishment ideas.
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    Brexiters are the real internationalists. Thank you Farage:



    Well done to Diane James for becoming the new UKIP leader. Lets make it strong again, and lets make Brexit happen.
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    That's something considerably less depressing than the Labour party.
 
 
 
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