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    (Original post by Pinkberry_y)
    Imperial or GTFO
    cosign
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    With a face like that, probably not
    lol
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    (Original post by RomeoSantos)
    is Leeds prestigious?
    Depends on who you speak to, some people think it is prestigeous others may think it is garbage.

    I think it has prestige, but not absolute prestige like Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Manchester, Imperial and LSE.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I think it has prestige, but not absolute prestige like Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Manchester, Imperial and LSE.
    Thanks for the information. I'm sure you are an expert on this matter.
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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Thanks for the information. I'm sure you are an expert on this matter.
    You are being sarcastic.

    To be fair, in the end, prestige is relative. Some kids at some universities believe that their uni is very prestigeous, when they are just average universities.

    Imo, you cannot debate the presitge of some of the London Universities and Oxbridge, but some people can debate the prestige of Leeds.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    Michael Gove did not go to Cambridge, he went to Oxford. Just wanted to correct you there

    On serious note, Michael Gove does not seem to be a bad person, despite the media portraying him as one.

    He went to a Grammar school and appears to be a very hardworking and intelligent person. It is a shame that people think he tried to destroy the Education system.
    Education system = steaming pile of poo.
    M. Gove = steaming pile of poo.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Education system = steaming pile of poo.
    M. Gove = steaming pile of poo.
    So M. Gove = Education System, then why did they reject him.

    Michael Gove wanted to bring back discipline to the system (apparently), but many people hated him. I think it was the classic case of people resisting any sort of change to the system.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    So M. Gove = Education System, then why did they reject him.

    Michael Gove wanted to bring back discipline to the system (apparently), but many people hated him. I think it was the classic case of people resisting any sort of change to the system.
    I don't really follow politics, but I know the education system is a mess. He was largely responsible for that system.
    Discipline, in most cases, isn't particularly auspicious to education. Enjoyment is...
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    (Original post by sketchymofo2)
    too bad that a prestigious or non prestigious university means not that much to employers now.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I don't really follow politics, but I know the education system is a mess. He was largely responsible for that system.
    Discipline, in most cases, isn't particularly auspicious to education. Enjoyment is...
    I don't agree. The problems with the education system has been there for many years, way before Michael Gove was in charge.

    The problems were magnified recently because the gap between the haves and have nots was covered in the news. This, together with the anger that "rich toffs from private schools" were ruling the UK, worsened the situation. This is because people felt that wealth and not ability was responsible for intergenerational success (which has always being the case).

    Michael Gove tried to correct the system by trying to get rid of the entrenched idea of "encouraged success", where your schooling determined your academic potential and whether you will be successful in the future.

    Gove did not think that UK's schools were truly competitive and weren't prepared for the future, so he made reforms. This unforunately did not bode well with the education sector, where they were used to a certain way of doing stuff and did not want to change.

    I am not saying that Gove is a saint, but I don't think that he is as bad as people think he is. Besides, he is a Tory and already has enough problems from being a member of their Party.

    Here is a page about him:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michae..._for_Education
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    I don't agree. The problems with the education system has been there for many years, way before Michael Gove was in charge.

    The problems were magnified recently because the gap between the haves and have nots was covered in the news. This, together with the anger that "rich toffs from private schools" were ruling the UK, worsened the situation. This is because people felt that wealth and not ability was responsible for intergenerational success (which has always being the case).

    Michael Gove tried to correct the system by trying to get rid of the entrenched idea of "encouraged success", where your schooling determined your academic potential and whether you will be successful in the future.

    Gove did not think that UK's schools were truly competitive and weren't prepared for the future, so he made reforms. This unforunately did not bode well with the education sector, where they were used to a certain way of doing stuff and did not want to change.

    I am not saying that Gove is a saint, but I don't think that he is as bad as people think he is. Besides, he is a Tory and already has enough problems from being a member of their Party.

    Here is a page about him:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michae..._for_Education
    I know I obviously oversimplify, but I just have him down as a toff who wished to take out all of the fun from education... which is educations principal problem at the level of learning, alongside inundated and demotivated teachers due to terrible working conditions.

    He was in charge of it all for a long time... and didn't get any better... and is now to the point where most trainee teachers drop out; with a retention rate funnier than a clown.

    His notion of privatising education ('academies') surely helps... where money is primary over educating... and pretty sure it wasn't an evidence based decision.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    x
    You have the issue of a, I suppose, selection bias.
    For instance, you are likely to find a different type of person will apply for a RG university rather than a non-RG... making the infographic useful but still highly confounded in determining the type of information employers use.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I know I obviously oversimplify, but I just have him down as a toff who wished to take out all of the fun from education... which is educations principal problem at the level of learning, alongside inundated and demotivated teachers due to terrible working conditions.

    He was in charge of it all for a long time... and didn't get any better... and is now to the point where most trainee teachers drop out; with a retention rate funnier than a clown.

    His notion of privatising education ('academies' surely helps... where money is primary over educating... and pretty sure it wasn't an evidence based decision.
    Fair enough.

    The principle of academies (how I understand it) is to encourage more local participation and focus more investments where needed, rather than the standardized approach that existed for many years with schools in very deprived areas losing the most.

    Gove was in charge for about 4 years as Secratary of Education, whatever he tried to do surely does not make him the person responsible for a broken education system that has existed more than 50 years, even more than he was alive.

    I agree that the education system is broken and needs change, but people won't agree to any change without you throwing billions of pounds at them to correct their approach.

    For universities like Oxford, UCL, Cambridge, Manchester, Imperial etc to have access programmes for poor people or kids from state schools show that the system is broken and Gove tried to fix it.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Where is this from?
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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Where is this from?
    chambersstudent

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    Fair enough.

    The principle of academies (how I understand it) is to encourage more local participation and focus more investments where needed, rather than the standardized approach that existed for many years with schools in very deprived areas losing the most.

    Gove was in charge for about 4 years as Secratary of Education, whatever he tried to do surely does not make him the person responsible for a broken education system that has existed more than 50 years, even more than he was alive.

    I agree that the education system is broken and needs change, but people won't agree to any change without you throwing billions of pounds at them to correct their approach.

    For universities like Oxford, UCL, Cambridge, Manchester, Imperial etc to have access programmes for poor people or kids from state schools show that the system is broken and Gove tried to fix it.
    The state of this country makes me extremely upset. Course I don't blame him entirely; I don't know enough about him and his role and his true ability to determine his own actions etc., and he was as you say playing the 'cards' he had been dealt (a poor one).

    I guess like the health system, the problem is principally that of massive under-funding (to allow privatisation?). Because apparently people aren't worth investing in.

    Rubbish country we live in.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    That graph is only for law employers. For pretty much every other career it doesn't matter that much. For example. The big4 accounting employers don't care about where you got your degree from.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    You have the issue of a, I suppose, selection bias.
    For instance, you are likely to find a different type of person will apply for a RG university rather than a non-RG... making the infographic useful but still highly confounded in determining the type of information employers use.
    I'm pretty sure that many people who go to law school in less famous universities still have a hope of becoming lawyer.

    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Where is this from?
    http://www.chambersstudent.com/where...d-universities

    (Original post by Trapz99)
    That graph is only for law employers. For pretty much every other career it doesn't matter that much. For example. The big4 accounting employers don't care about where you got your degree from.
    No, not "pretty much every other career". Each economic sector and job has its own university ranking. For some it doesn't matter, for others it matters a lot. Overall, prestigious universities (whatever that means) top more career-specific rankings than other unis.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    I'm pretty sure that many people who go to law school in less famous universities still have a hope of becoming lawyer.


    http://www.chambersstudent.com/where...d-universities



    No, not "pretty much every other career". Each economic sector and job has its own university ranking. For some it doesn't matter, for others it matters a lot. Overall, prestigious universities (whatever that means) top more career-specific rankings than other unis.
    I didn't know it was for law, sorry.
    Though how many people who do law actually become a lawyer?
    I still think the confound stands for university ranking methods
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    (Original post by Josb)


    No, not "pretty much every other career". Each economic sector and job has its own university ranking. For some it doesn't matter, for others it matters a lot. Overall, prestigious universities (whatever that means) top more career-specific rankings than other unis.
    Apart from law, banking, asset management, software engineering at a big tech firm, consulting, it really does not matter what university you go to.
 
 
 
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