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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    What degree did you do?
    Biology
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    Biology
    You see, I was very fortunate to have done work experience in a neuroscience laboratory at Imperial and the head of directors of the labs at imperial basically warned me to stay away from biochemistry and biology degrees. He completely wiped my interest in neuroscience;however I'm glad he warned me. Literally nobody believes me and gets mad when I say biology really isn't worth it.
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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    You see, I was very fortunate to have done work experience in a neuroscience laboratory at Imperial and the head of directors of the labs at imperial basically warned me to stay away from biochemistry and biology degrees. He completely wiped my interest in neuroscience;however I'm glad he warned me. Literally nobody believes me and gets mad when I say biology really isn't worth it.
    To be honest I don't think people should choose their degree based on their job prospects (as long as it's a 'sensible' degree, if you know what I mean...). Most people I know don't want to enter something directly related to their degree - most careers like consultancy, marketing, management etc don't ask for a specific subject but prefer degree education. No point me doing maths or a similar degree I won't enjoy and won't be good at (I wouldn't have got to Oxford otherwise).

    I'm not looking for a research job really, but would love to enter public health or health policy - the health knowledge I've learnt during my degree is actually very useful for my current internship (although there are obviously people working there without that background).

    Out of interest what subject did you do?
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    To be honest I don't think people should choose their degree based on their job prospects (as long as it's a 'sensible' degree, if you know what I mean...). Most people I know don't want to enter something directly related to their degree - most careers like consultancy, marketing, management etc don't ask for a specific subject but prefer degree education. No point me doing maths or a similar degree I won't enjoy and won't be good at (I wouldn't have got to Oxford otherwise).

    I'm not looking for a research job really, but would love to enter public health or health policy - the health knowledge I've learnt during my degree is actually very useful for my current internship (although there are obviously people working there without that background).

    Out of interest what subject did you do?
    I haven't done a degree yet. I'm applying for university for 2017 entry. I want to do chemical engineering though. I do actually really enjoy chemistry and maths, they are the only A level subjects I don't struggle with. I find biology quite hard
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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    I haven't done a degree yet. I'm applying for university for 2017 entry. I want to do chemical engineering though. I do actually really enjoy chemistry and maths, they are the only A level subjects I don't struggle with. I find biology quite hard
    Biology is one of the easiest A-levels out there. 90% of the things u need to know are all visuals.




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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    To be honest I don't think people should choose their degree based on their job prospects (as long as it's a 'sensible' degree, if you know what I mean...). Most people I know don't want to enter something directly related to their degree - most careers like consultancy, marketing, management etc don't ask for a specific subject but prefer degree education. No point me doing maths or a similar degree I won't enjoy and won't be good at (I wouldn't have got to Oxford otherwise).

    I'm not looking for a research job really, but would love to enter public health or health policy - the health knowledge I've learnt during my degree is actually very useful for my current internship (although there are obviously people working there without that background).

    Out of interest what subject did you do?
    Biology degrees are a dime a dozen, so many biology grads around these days that you have to be extra, extra special if you want a grad job.

    And yes, you may be trying, but you are not trying hard enough. Just "trying" does not cut it, not in today's job market.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Biology degrees are a dime a dozen, so many biology grads around these days that you have to be extra, extra special if you want a grad job.

    And yes, you may be trying, but you are not trying hard enough. Just "trying" does not cut it, not in today's job market.
    I think you're being a little bit rude and harsh. He went to oxford?
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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    I think you're being a little bit rude and harsh. He went to oxford?
    Yes I know, but an Oxford degree alone is not enough to ensure full-time employment after graduation. It may spike the employer's interest at first, but if there are graduates from other Russell Group unis with more work experience then those are the ones that will be put at the top of the pile.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Yes I know, but an Oxford degree alone is not enough to ensure full-time employment after graduation. It may spike the employer's interest at first, but if there are graduates from other Russell Group unis with more work experience then those are the ones that will be put at the top of the pile.
    Yeah, obviously, work experience and character play a role. But you can't say he is not trying. I'm also going to judge from the fact he went to oxford that he does work hard. Yes, the job market is tough, but you don't need to make him feel worse about his situation. If you're experienced in this field, it may be more helpful to give him tips than putting him down?
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Yes I know, but an Oxford degree alone is not enough to ensure full-time employment after graduation. It may spike the employer's interest at first, but if there are graduates from other Russell Group unis with more work experience then those are the ones that will be put at the top of the pile.
    This^

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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    You see, I was very fortunate to have done work experience in a neuroscience laboratory at Imperial and the head of directors of the labs at imperial basically warned me to stay away from biochemistry and biology degrees. He completely wiped my interest in neuroscience;however I'm glad he warned me. Literally nobody believes me and gets mad when I say biology really isn't worth it.
    I've done a Biology type degree and I agree with you to an extent. Many of my coursemates have struggled to find jobs in the industry as they're mostly reserved for those with a Masters or PhD, but they do have jobs. Many people are lazy and it's usually those that bother to go out there and get internships, that can get the grad jobs in bio. I did a placement year and I'm currently going on to do my Masters degree, but before I decided on Masters, I was applying for jobs and I was getting offers for jobs in bio companies (+ job offers from my placement company). In bio it really just does come down to experience and/or getting the higher level qualifications.

    Oh and I only go to a mid range University.

    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    To be honest I don't think people should choose their degree based on their job prospects (as long as it's a 'sensible' degree, if you know what I mean...). Most people I know don't want to enter something directly related to their degree - most careers like consultancy, marketing, management etc don't ask for a specific subject but prefer degree education. No point me doing maths or a similar degree I won't enjoy and won't be good at (I wouldn't have got to Oxford otherwise).

    I'm not looking for a research job really, but would love to enter public health or health policy - the health knowledge I've learnt during my degree is actually very useful for my current internship (although there are obviously people working there without that background).

    Out of interest what subject did you do?

    I agree with you. I feel like we should choose the subjects that we're good at. For me personally, I don't see the point in paying so much money for 3/4 year degree that you won't enjoy. Gaining internship experience is great for your CV, but I also think another part of the problem is people don't quite know how to sell themselves. If you're interested in Public Health, I personally would advice gaining more relevant experience or possibly doing a masters in public health, as this will really make you stand out from the crowd.

    Good luck!


    (Original post by nerdling_CompSci)
    Biology is one of the easiest A-levels out there. 90% of the things u need to know are all visuals.
    We're not talking about A-Levels - I really wish when people talk about biology they actually understand that at degree level it is nothing like A-levels. There's a lot more to it than that.
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    (Original post by Saliency)
    I've done a Biology type degree and I agree with you to an extent. Many of my coursemates have struggled to find jobs in the industry as they're mostly reserved for those with a Masters or PhD, but they do have jobs. Many people are lazy and it's usually those that bother to go out there and get internships, that can get the grad jobs in bio. I did a placement year and I'm currently going on to do my Masters degree, but before I decided on Masters, I was applying for jobs and I was getting offers for jobs in bio companies (+ job offers from my placement company). In bio it really just does come down to experience and/or getting the higher level qualifications.

    Oh and I only go to a mid range University.




    I agree with you. I feel like we should choose the subjects that we're good at. For me personally, I don't see the point in paying so much money for 3/4 year degree that you won't enjoy. Gaining internship experience is great for your CV, but I also think another part of the problem is people don't quite know how to sell themselves. If you're interested in Public Health, I personally would advice gaining more relevant experience or possibly doing a masters in public health, as this will really make you stand out from the crowd.

    Good luck!




    We're not talking about A-Levels - I really wish when people talk about biology they actually understand that at degree level it is nothing like A-levels. There's a lot more to it than that.
    Yes, he essentially told me that if you want to get most jobs in biology you would need a masters or phd. ( I didn't really fancy the idea of a phd). He also said that working for pharmaceutical companies can be quite unstable because they can just completely shut down and then you're out of the job and then have to compete wth your colleagues for all the new ones
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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    Yeah, obviously, work experience and character play a role. But you can't say he is not trying. I'm also going to judge from the fact he went to oxford that he does work hard. Yes, the job market is tough, but you don't need to make him feel worse about his situation. If you're experienced in this field, it may be more helpful to give him tips than putting him down?
    Yeh I don't see what's so difficult about understanding there are a limited number of positions in the fields grads apply to, you can try all you want but if for whatever reason someone has better experience, better interview skills and in some way has one up on you then they'll get the job and you won't. There are people that simply will always fail in this situation regardless of how hard you 'try' because it's a competition.
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    (Original post by APersonYo)
    Yes, he essentially told me that if you want to get most jobs in biology you would need a masters or phd. ( I didn't really fancy the idea of a phd). He also said that working for pharmaceutical companies can be quite unstable because they can just completely shut down and then you're out of the job and then have to compete wth your colleagues for all the new ones
    How the hell can they just "shut down"?!
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    (Original post by asmuse123)
    How the hell can they just "shut down"?!
    Research funding withdrawal usually.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Biology degrees are a dime a dozen, so many biology grads around these days that you have to be extra, extra special if you want a grad job.

    And yes, you may be trying, but you are not trying hard enough. Just "trying" does not cut it, not in today's job market.
    I've literally got a First Class degree from Oxford and am currently working 2 jobs - one in my chosen field, the other at weekends to make up for the fact that my internship is unpaid. The rest of my time is spent applying for other jobs. Please explain to me how I could be doing more - and how I can magically create time to be doing more?

    (p.s. for other commenters, I'm a girl )
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    Also want to make clear that I don't (and didn't) expect to fall straight into a grad job after leaving uni - hence why I took the time to apply for lower level jobs as well. But if the subject matter is graduates feeling disenchanted and pessimistic then that is certainly true - as I have said, I worry constantly about whether I will be able to find (even an entry level) job after I finish my internship despite having a great degree, great work experience etc. It's not about feeling disappointed that I haven't got a grad job yet - it's about feeling frustrated about even entry level jobs.
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    You can say what you want about graduates, how about the companies who post job vacancies but can't fill them because they don't actually know what they are looking for? I've heard of some companies struggling to fill places for a year
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    It's hard but you can get somewhere. Many students go uni simply thinking their degree alone will get them a job. It won't (even if you're a STEM snob). You have to get involved in sociteties or other voluntary activities to enhance your CV, as well as internships or even a pet time job (anything to put on your cv will help, even a summer job if doing one whilst studying is too difficult for you)

    After graduating you won't always get a job straight away, you have to be patient or work a job you don't want long term to keep enhancing your CV. It took me a whole year to find a job after graduating, I failed my initial interviews due to lack of experience, so I worked as an intern for almost a year (under minimum wage) to enhance my CV, and after that I managed to get the job I wanted and went to uni for in the first place.
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    Very unfair, the generation before us had it easier.
 
 
 
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