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Why would anyone want to be a doctor when they could be a trader? watch

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    (Original post by UWS)
    So doctors don't get to shag nice women? Pretty sure women would rather go for someone with brains...
    I've got bad news for you pal...

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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    Why no 33% in 4 weeks!

    This is why I hate ETFs (the majority), unless you want exposure to India (then yes, because I don't understand the companies there).

    The companies losing you money right now are the miners and the banks, don't hold them. And the gold companies, they will get battered now and rightly so, we are in a bull market not a market crash!
    Mate. What part of 'I cba actively managing it', do you not get?

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    Haven't you seen the film "Wall Street" with Charlie Sheen?

    Moral of the story is:
    Spoiler:
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    Trading Sucks
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    My lecturer at QMUL had his own hedgefund. So you are right!

    He taught part time in the evenings and did some crazy stuff with futures for the rest of the week. I don't even think they were futures, must have been something exotic.
    It's amazing ain't it? I guess since my old man works in finance it made sense to choose the corporate world over medicine. Do you do FOREX trading at home or for a. company?
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    FYI I work for a fuel trading company and it's not that great you know.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The whole paragraph made 0 sense whatsoever. Actuarial Science? 50-100k? hedge fund manager directly after uni?

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    It made sense because you can become a hedge fund manager anytime that's why I used so many examples. If it made sense to the other guy then I'm seriously wondering what goes on through your head.
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    (Original post by Dnkz7)
    It made sense because you can become a hedge fund manager anytime that's why I used so many examples. If it made sense to the other guy then I'm seriously wondering what goes on through your head.
    Yah, the average 21-22 year old has the connections and track record to make a hedge fund. Banter.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yah, the average 21-22 year old has the connections and track record to make a hedge fund. Banter.

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    Funny you say that, not everyone is the so called ''average'' 21/22year old. Sounds pretty stupid when you don't know every 21/22 year old and what their intentions are. *facepalm*

    You've got to be motivated, attend classes where you'll get taught how to trade. It's really up to the person.

    For someone who is that bright, you cannot see the simpler picture here can you?
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    Yes, but I made that money doing nothing. And you can't compare yourself to making more than a successful trader.

    One stock, Interserve (FTSE 250 listed), I made 33% return in 4 weeks, £670 in 4 weeks for doing nothing.

    2-3 locum shifts won't pay £1500
    At my level, yes they will. More if it's short notice and/or they're really desperate for someone.

    Of course I'm not making more than a successful trader, nobody would try to claim otherwise. The point is that I, and most doctors, just aren't that bothered about that. You can witter on about how much you made by "doing nothing" (except you didn't actually do nothing, did you?) but I really don't care. Just don't pretend that you playing around with a few grand makes you the next Wolf of Wall Street.
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    Lol especially the Oxbridge doctors. OMG what a waste of talent. They WERE smart enough to be successful traders but decided to waste their time doing TTOs lol
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    At my level, yes they will. More if it's short notice and/or they're really desperate for someone.

    Of course I'm not making more than a successful trader, nobody would try to claim otherwise. The point is that I, and most doctors, just aren't that bothered about that. You can witter on about how much you made by "doing nothing" (except you didn't actually do nothing, did you?) but I really don't care. Just don't pretend that you playing around with a few grand makes you the next Wolf of Wall Street.
    I agree - although you could argue that the ones who want to work privately are also salary motivated as well right?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    At my level, yes they will. More if it's short notice and/or they're really desperate for someone.

    Of course I'm not making more than a successful trader, nobody would try to claim otherwise. The point is that I, and most doctors, just aren't that bothered about that. You can witter on about how much you made by "doing nothing" (except you didn't actually do nothing, did you?) but I really don't care. Just don't pretend that you playing around with a few grand makes you the next Wolf of Wall Street.
    Getting 80-90% return in a year is very impressive though. It is wolf of wall street like!

    No fund in the world will return that consistently.
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    This is probably the only thread on TSR where you have traders/investors and medics arguing.
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    I'd like to see you make £1500 in 4 weeks, without leverage.
    I can, and have, multiple times. I've also lost that in 4 weeks, multiple times. You've been lucky to start, but nobody can consistently hit that rate (we're talking ~100% ROI here, which nobody achieves long-term). When the downswing comes, you'll be upset.
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    (Original post by momoneyme89)
    You need to buying on P/E, it is the best metric, other than PEG ratio (but that is a different story).

    Think of P/E like this, something with a high P/E like ABF (the owners of primark) have to perform so much better for their stock to rise, because a lot of earnings have been priced into the stock.

    So easyjet can do ok and the stock price will rise. It's just a cheap stock that is undervalued. I know the company is not great, but they still make money and that stock will return 50-60% in the next year for sure.

    Now holding onto these stocks is another question, ABF might perform better in the super long run, but for the next 2-3 years their stock price won't grow as much (unless primark really does deliver)
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Mostly in various ETFs (Vanguad, FTSE trackers, commodities trackers), cba actively managing it.

    As for the £2k, I have a decent amount in GOOGL (+17% from when I bought it in July), some of it in oil (bought at $29/bbl), some of it in recent M&A plays (e.g. Starwood acquisition), lost a few bucks in AAPL because I went long at the wrong time..



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    Why are you guys trading equities lol
    None of you could outperform the S&P 500 on a consistent basis trading equities because the market discounts everything you see on the news before you can act on it.

    The only way to make money without inside information is macro.

    My cousin is a prop trader in EMEA Emerging Markets at a major investment bank. He told me this.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    I can, and have, multiple times. I've also lost that in 4 weeks, multiple times. You've been lucky to start, but nobody can consistently hit that rate (we're talking ~100% ROI here, which nobody achieves long-term). When the downswing comes, you'll be upset.
    Just look at the stocks I've bought, their P/Es, and their chart. I think we will hit 80-90% in 1 year.

    Galliford Try, Legal and General, Berkley Group Holdings, Paragon Group of Companies, Interserve

    You can hit the rate, if you sell off these companies once the P/E gets too high and try to find other undervalued good stocks. But this becomes more long term swing trading than buy and hold investing.
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    (Original post by Dnkz7)
    I agree - although you could argue that the ones who want to work privately are also salary motivated as well right?
    Yep, there are definitely some more in it for the money than others, but to make serious money in private practice takes a lot of time and energy invested in the NHS first - unless you're that Christian Jessen, you won't get decent employment in the private sector until you're a consultant/fully qualified GP, and usually have taken a few years at consultant level to build up a reputation and potential client base. Most of them also still work a full-time NHS job and do the private work on top of that, very few outside London do pure private as there just isn't the market in the UK. And the malpractice insurance premiums are HUGE. :eek: I think a lot of them do it to e.g. pay private school fees/buy nice handbags rather than to make megabucks.

    (Original post by 4EX)
    Lol especially the Oxbridge doctors. OMG what a waste of talent. They WERE smart enough to be successful traders but decided to waste their time doing TTOs lol
    But not everyone who graduates from Oxbridge WANTS to be a trader - and if they did, there wouldn't be enough jobs for them!

    What I CAN do, when Mr Successful Trader collapses in the street while walking to a Harley Street clinic, (*) is lead the resuscitation team when he is brought into our NHS hospital in cardiac arrest (because the private sector won't do emergencies). I can put a tube into his airway where he's just vomited his Michelin-starred lunch, and ventilate him. I can tell when he needs defibrillation, and do it safely. I can cut off his Savile Row suit so that other people can insert lines into his veins and arteries to give the necessary drugs, and so the cardiologists can get to his groin to stick in their cardiac catheterisation kit to unblock his coronaries which are knackered after years of booze, coke and foie gras. I can take him to ICU, where along with the rest of the team I can not only keep him alive, but give him the best chance of survival with good brain function afterwards. He'll probably have made more money while in a coma than I will that week, or any of the willy-waving boys on this thread have. THEN I'll write the damn TTO. I don't feel like my talents are wasted.

    *based on a true story.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yep, there are definitely some more in it for the money than others, but to make serious money in private practice takes a lot of time and energy invested in the NHS first - unless you're that Christian Jessen, you won't get decent employment in the private sector until you're a consultant/fully qualified GP, and usually have taken a few years at consultant level to build up a reputation and potential client base. Most of them also still work a full-time NHS job and do the private work on top of that, very few outside London do pure private as there just isn't the market in the UK. And the malpractice insurance premiums are HUGE. :eek: I think a lot of them do it to e.g. pay private school fees/buy nice handbags rather than to make megabucks.


    But not everyone who graduates from Oxbridge WANTS to be a trader - and if they did, there wouldn't be enough jobs for them!

    What I CAN do, when Mr Successful Trader collapses in the street while walking to a Harley Street clinic, (*) is lead the resuscitation team when he is brought into our NHS hospital in cardiac arrest (because the private sector won't do emergencies). I can put a tube into his airway where he's just vomited his Michelin-starred lunch, and ventilate him. I can tell when he needs defibrillation, and do it safely. I can cut off his Savile Row suit so that other people can insert lines into his veins and arteries to give the necessary drugs, and so the cardiologists can get to his groin to stick in their cardiac catheterisation kit to unblock his coronaries which are knackered after years of booze, coke and foie gras. I can take him to ICU, where along with the rest of the team I can not only keep him alive, but give him the best chance of survival with good brain function afterwards. He'll probably have made more money while in a coma than I will that week, or any of the willy-waving boys on this thread have. THEN I'll write the damn TTO. I don't feel like my talents are wasted.

    *based on a true story.
    HIs brain function primarily depends on the downtime he suffered from Harley St into your A&E and then secondarily on how quickly and efficiently the cardiologists were able to unblock his arteries. After that you're just making 1% differences!

    But yes, I get the picture. Not everyone wants money. But for those who do...
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    Im interested in trading, so where would you suggest that i start and how did you guys learn about it

    when did you start and how did you learn,

    how much were you making,

    which broker sites are you using,

    and what site do you suggest i start to trade on???
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    Why would anyone want to save your life while they could sell your organs when you're dead.
 
 
 
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