What surprised you after you started working as a Solicitor/Barister? Watch

Stealth-Mode
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#61
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#61
(Original post by Solemn Wanderer)
And never listen to the clerks in their room. Ever
why, pray tell?
0
quote
reply
Lewisy-boy
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#62
Report 10 years ago
#62
Kavanagh haha. I knew criminal barristers didn't earn a shed load when they first achieved tenancy, but I didn't expect them to be taking home less than minimum wage. I suppose, however, that it's more to do with the sheer number of hours they have to do in order to do their job correctly that severely downgrades their 'hourly earnings', although I'm puzzled as to how this is possible when barristers (I presume although I have no direct knowledge of it) charge by the hour.
0
quote
reply
TommehR
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#63
Report 10 years ago
#63
(Original post by Lewisy-boy)
Kavanagh haha. I knew criminal barristers didn't earn a shed load when they first achieved tenancy, but I didn't expect them to be taking home less than minimum wage. I suppose, however, that it's more to do with the sheer number of hours they have to do in order to do their job correctly that severely downgrades their 'hourly earnings', although I'm puzzled as to how this is possible when barristers (I presume although I have no direct knowledge of it) charge by the hour.
I remember reading in one of these student guides to Training Contracts about two trainees at a MC firm (CC, I think) who worked out that over a period of a couple of months, relative to the hours they worked they were getting paid less than they would have got doing grunt work at Tesco. :p:
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#64
Report 10 years ago
#64
(Original post by Lewisy-boy)
Kavanagh haha. I knew criminal barristers didn't earn a shed load when they first achieved tenancy, but I didn't expect them to be taking home less than minimum wage. I suppose, however, that it's more to do with the sheer number of hours they have to do in order to do their job correctly that severely downgrades their 'hourly earnings', although I'm puzzled as to how this is possible when barristers (I presume although I have no direct knowledge of it) charge by the hour.
No, I meant you are earning less annually than you would if you were working full-time on the minimum wage...
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#65
Report 10 years ago
#65
(Original post by Hullshire)
Suppose you have to prepare for it psychologically and have 'coping' strategies at hand, namely cakes and biscuits.
To a degree it does depend on your master - you might have one who demands you bake him biscuits :rolleyes: or one who buys you chocolate biscuits himself...it's not always THAT bad...but having canvassed opinion among other pupils I don't think there's anyone who hasn't had at least one "low" - a really stressful period or a horrible feeling you've said the wrong thing or whatever! Also I think all pupils feel that they are in limbo which is not the nicest feeling no matter what the circumstances.
0
quote
reply
TommehR
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#66
Report 10 years ago
#66
Haha, I'd imagine that if a fairly senior male master said to a female pupil that she should have some 'coping' strategies in the form of cakes, biscuits, and chocolate he might be looking at a sexual discrimination lawsuit.

Although, you might be so desperate for tenancy that you let it go. :p:
0
quote
reply
Lady Narcissus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#67
Report 10 years ago
#67
(Original post by Nana_Julia)
To a degree it does depend on your master - you might have one who demands you bake him biscuits :rolleyes: or one who buys you chocolate biscuits himself...it's not always THAT bad...but having canvassed opinion among other pupils I don't think there's anyone who hasn't had at least one "low" - a really stressful period or a horrible feeling you've said the wrong thing or whatever! Also I think all pupils feel that they are in limbo which is not the nicest feeling no matter what the circumstances.
Geez when does the stress and uncertainty ever end: degree; masters; BVC; pupillage...?

I suppose it just depends on the person that you work for, lucky me; I'm doing a research project at the moment on Criminal Justice with a nice guy in charge who not only gave me tea and biscuits but also his free conference bag YEY
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#68
Report 10 years ago
#68
(Original post by TommehR)
Haha, I'd imagine that if a fairly senior male master said to a female pupil that she should have some 'coping' strategies in the form of cakes, biscuits, and chocolate he might be looking at a sexual discrimination lawsuit.

Although, you might be so desperate for tenancy that you let it go. :p:
Unfortunately, you have NO IDEA how right you are...:rolleyes:
0
quote
reply
Lady Narcissus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#69
Report 10 years ago
#69
Nah you'd just make him purchase a year supply as a settlement.
0
quote
reply
Lady Narcissus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#70
Report 10 years ago
#70
Ha I saw a male barrister reduced to tears by another barrister in a conference.

Too right Solemn, cakes and biscuits are bloody useful. Just think of the offence caused if whiskey was offered, are you suggesting I am a wee alcoholic pupil out of control.......?
0
quote
reply
chalks
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#71
Report 10 years ago
#71
(Original post by Stealth-Mode)
For those who are currently working in the legal professions, are there any myths or preconceptions that you put to rest once starting work?

Any unforeseen disadvantages that the field of work has had?
This is a good question. Nana J has answered from the Bar perspective and a few of her comments hold true for my side of the fence namely:

- No excuses. Get something wrong once, that's acceptable. Get it wrong twice and you'll be toast. No-one will give a monkeys if you're tired, stressed, upset etc etc. Deal with it.

- The workload can be phenomenal. Students may put in the same number of hours per week but thats of your own making and is something which you can control. It can be quite demeaning, sitting there with your shiny degree and LPC distinction, to be proof-reading and photocopying into the early hours of the morning.

- the politics. Unbelievable.

In addition:

- professionalism. It can be quite uplifting to work with people who take their jobs so seriously and are prepared to work incredibly hard for their clients - not because it brings in cash but because it is the right thing to do. Equally, when you see a lawyer make a hard call to a client's detriment because, ethically, that is required.

- utter lack of people management skills. So many partners are fabulous lawyers but couldn't manage their way out of a paper bag. I find it amazing to this day that there seems to be an inherent misunderstanding of what actually makes people tick and, therefore, how to reward and motivate them. It still seems to be based on the "Work 'em hard, pay 'em loads, promise 'em partnership" method which, frankly, is laughably outdated compared to modern business.
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#72
Report 10 years ago
#72
(Original post by chalks)

- The workload can be phenomenal. Students may put in the same number of hours per week but thats of your own making and is something which you can control. It can be quite demeaning, sitting there with your shiny degree and LPC distinction, to be proof-reading and photocopying into the early hours of the morning.
Something that has surprised me is actually the exact opposite - I have been given an inordinate amount of responsibility and really challenging work from day one, and I didn't expect that at all. My friends in magic circle firms have found exactly as you say chalks - we sometimes lick each other's wounds with them saying "he treats me like an idiot!" and me saying "he expects me to be as good as a QC!" - clearly legal training isn't crazy about balance...?! I'm used to the high expectations now and think it has maybe been a good thing but it certainly keeps stress levels nice and high!
0
quote
reply
chalks
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#73
Report 10 years ago
#73
That's the downside with large City firms. Many applicants think they're going to get wonderful training but the reality is that you'll get far better on-the-job experience in a small London firm or a provincial outfit.

As for stress levels etc - we've all been there! One good way of keeping yourself de-stressed is to look back on what you've achieved. Things that you now do easily were the tasks which seemed terrifying a few months ago. Its likely that, in a couple of months time, you'll feel similar about the issues which stress you today!

Also - keep in mind that its only a job! Never let it rule your "real" life...
0
quote
reply
Wangers
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#74
Report 10 years ago
#74
As for stress - nothing like port and a good book with the Moonlight Sonata playing in the background
0
quote
reply
Ishtar
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#75
Report 10 years ago
#75
(Original post by Wangers)
As for stress - nothing like port and a good book with the Moonlight Sonata playing in the background
True story! Although my preferred formula involves port, a bath and some Bach.
0
quote
reply
Stealth-Mode
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#76
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#76
(Original post by chalks)
This is a good question. Nana J has answered from the Bar perspective and a few of her comments hold true for my side of the fence namely:

- No excuses. Get something wrong once, that's acceptable. Get it wrong twice and you'll be toast. No-one will give a monkeys if you're tired, stressed, upset etc etc. Deal with it.

- The workload can be phenomenal. Students may put in the same number of hours per week but thats of your own making and is something which you can control. It can be quite demeaning, sitting there with your shiny degree and LPC distinction, to be proof-reading and photocopying into the early hours of the morning.

- the politics. Unbelievable.

In addition:

- professionalism. It can be quite uplifting to work with people who take their jobs so seriously and are prepared to work incredibly hard for their clients - not because it brings in cash but because it is the right thing to do. Equally, when you see a lawyer make a hard call to a client's detriment because, ethically, that is required.

- utter lack of people management skills. So many partners are fabulous lawyers but couldn't manage their way out of a paper bag. I find it amazing to this day that there seems to be an inherent misunderstanding of what actually makes people tick and, therefore, how to reward and motivate them. It still seems to be based on the "Work 'em hard, pay 'em loads, promise 'em partnership" method which, frankly, is laughably outdated compared to modern business.
Cheers Chalks.

When you refer to politics- how so? People back-biting for partnership/promotion?

I.O.U. :rep
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#77
Report 10 years ago
#77
(Original post by chalks)
Also - keep in mind that its only a job! Never let it rule your "real" life...
Very true, thanks for the encouragement Chalks, I don't intend to let the job rule my life...once I get it! But getting it is ruling my life despite my best efforts...only another seven months, only another seven months...

In case you're wondering (as I would be) how the hell I am posting every ten minutes while on pupillage, fear not, I am on holiday this week - with my family, hence high post count!!

My ways of relaxing are a lot less high-brow I must say...hot chocolate, pizza, pyjamas and a **** film...

Nana J - I like it
0
quote
reply
Wangers
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#78
Report 10 years ago
#78
(Original post by Nana_Julia)

My ways of relaxing are a lot less high-brow I must say...hot chocolate, pizza, pyjamas and a **** film...

Nana J - I like it
'The Honourable...

Port isn't really any more high brow then any other wine tbh...Incedentally, they reminded me of 'Burlington Bertie' - if that rings a bell with you.
0
quote
reply
Wangers
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#79
Report 10 years ago
#79
(Original post by Nana_Julia)
Very true, thanks for the encouragement Chalks, I don't intend to let the job rule my life...once I get it! But getting it is ruling my life despite my best efforts...only another seven months, only another seven months...

In case you're wondering (as I would be) how the hell I am posting every ten minutes while on pupillage, fear not, I am on holiday this week - with my family, hence high post count!!

My ways of relaxing are a lot less high-brow I must say...hot chocolate, pizza, pyjamas and a **** film...

Nana J - I like it
Incidentally, if you're feeling bored - put that contract stuff to use and have a look at this
0
quote
reply
Nana_Julia
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#80
Report 10 years ago
#80
(Original post by Wangers)
Incidentally, if you're feeling bored - put that contract stuff to use and have a look at this
I am NEVER that bored...
0
quote
reply
X

Reply to thread

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should Banksy be put in prison?

Yes (249)
14.47%
No (1472)
85.53%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise