Why CAN'T you apply to both Oxford and Cambridge? Watch

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lets_make_some_music
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#61
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#61
i guess its because its harder to get an offer, and you only get 5 choices so there's more chance of not recieving many offers, if any at all
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LouLou92
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#62
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#62
i think, as has already been mentioned, it would be too many applicants and a hard choice for people if they got into both, but also think on their part it's kind of like they want you to have a preference in their favour
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LouLou92
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#63
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#63
you applied to both oxford and cambridge?
how would they know you'd applied to the other?
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Eva2
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#64
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yeah i think the other posts have explained it pretty well. the application system would be a nightmare if you would be able to apply to both.

what I dont understand is why an open application is regarded as a negative thing in Oxbridge. I mean there are so many colleges in Oxford and Cambridge, how the hell are you supposed to chose?
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Totally Tom
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#65
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adding to this thread, giving offers would be hard also, as at the moment if they give an offer they expect it to be firmed, if you had an offer from both they don't know who you're going to firm. so one year one of them might get a ridiculous amount of people accepting or one might have too few?
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around
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#66
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#66
UCAS wouldn't let you.
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keepa7
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#67
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#67
I'm sure UCAS would stop you from doing that

EDIT: damn too slow
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Picnic1
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#68
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What other replies have said. Also maybe Oxford don't want to be seen to give an offer to a potential Cambridge reject nor vice versa.- it could be seen to reflect badly on their own standards.
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nexttime
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#69
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(Original post by Eva2)
yeah i think the other posts have explained it pretty well. the application system would be a nightmare if you would be able to apply to both.

what I dont understand is why an open application is regarded as a negative thing in Oxbridge. I mean there are so many colleges in Oxford and Cambridge, how the hell are you supposed to chose?
Viewed as negative by who? (other than me!)

If you really can't decide from things like location, what it looks like, facilities (e.g. sport), the tutors, accommodation, 'atmosphere', size, then put all of the names in a hat, remove the ones you DON'T want to go to and pick it randomly that way. Otherwise, i promise you, you would end up in the one college you did not want to go to! (usually Catz... :p: ).
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Eva2
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#70
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(Original post by nexttime)
Viewed as negative by who? (other than me!)

If you really can't decide from things like location, what it looks like, facilities (e.g. sport), the tutors, accommodation, 'atmosphere', size, then put all of the names in a hat, remove the ones you DON'T want to go to and pick it randomly that way. Otherwise, i promise you, you would end up in the one college you did not want to go to! (usually Catz... :p: ).
To the administrators, someone that sends an open application is someone that is indecisive about what they want to do and where they want to go, which is a trait students can't afford to have at university. I'm not inventing this, I've been to several Oxbridge meetings within my college and they all say the same things. But if you really must chose a college, how do you do so? It's impossible to attend all open days and there isn't much information concerning the individual colleges.
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Tyraell
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#71
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#71
People who can't use the search function shouldn't be able to apply to either.:p:
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Superhans121
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#72
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#72
it would be an absolute nightmare because:

at the moment oxbridge know that effectively 100% of the offers they make are taken up and accepted

now, if you could apply to both Oxford and Cambridge they would have to deal with the prospect of their offer being rejected in favour of the other one. this would completely screw the already dubious admissions system.

the cause of the problem is that Oxbridge are absolutely streaks ahead of all the other British unis
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MewMachine
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#73
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(Original post by morrisajm)
cause you have to put 1. and 2. on your ucas form and they dont like that haha
No you don't...

(Original post by klondiker)
I think it's also because they want you to have really thought about which course you want to do (especially because similar courses are taught quite differently at both places). They would much rather take someone who is passionate a specific course, rather than someone who just wants to go to Oxbridge.
Yeah that sounds right, otherwise I think there would be a fair few people who applied to both just because it's Oxbridge.
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MewMachine
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#74
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(Original post by Eva2)
To the administrators, someone that sends an open application is someone that is indecisive about what they want to do and where they want to go, which is a trait students can't afford to have at university. I'm not inventing this, I've been to several Oxbridge meetings within my college and they all say the same things. But if you really must chose a college, how do you do so? It's impossible to attend all open days and there isn't much information concerning the individual colleges.
I've been to several at my college and they've told me the converse- making an open application won't disadvantage you in any way. In fact I don't think they even ask you why you applied to a college at interview? (because you may have been pooled, etc), though if I'm wrong, someone feel free to correct.
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xmarilynx
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#75
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(Original post by Eva2)
To the administrators, someone that sends an open application is someone that is indecisive about what they want to do and where they want to go, which is a trait students can't afford to have at university. I'm not inventing this, I've been to several Oxbridge meetings within my college and they all say the same things. But if you really must chose a college, how do you do so? It's impossible to attend all open days and there isn't much information concerning the individual colleges.
But when they're given your application they don't know whether you've made an open application or applied to that college, so I'm not convinced that's true....
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Eva2
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#76
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(Original post by xmarilynx)
But when they're given your application they don't know whether you've made an open application or applied to that college, so I'm not convinced that's true....
They do know, because they get the complete aplication form. Otherwise they wouldn't know whether you've made a choice or not, which wouldn't make much sense at all...
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Eva2
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(Original post by MewMachine)
I've been to several at my college and they've told me the converse- making an open application won't disadvantage you in any way. In fact I don't think they even ask you why you applied to a college at interview? (because you may have been pooled, etc), though if I'm wrong, someone feel free to correct.
That's funny, seeing as they've told me exactly the opposite, that it DOES leave you at a disadvantage. I even spoke to a Cambridge student about it, and she agreed. Not in terms of doing the interview, but it might influence their choice on whether they chose you for an interview in the first place. I don't exactly understand why, but that's just the way it is.
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MewMachine
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#78
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(Original post by Eva2)
That's funny, seeing as they've told me exactly the opposite, that it DOES leave you at a disadvantage. I even spoke to a Cambridge student about it, and she agreed. Not in terms of doing the interview, but it might influence their choice on whether they chose you for an interview in the first place. I don't exactly understand why, but that's just the way it is.
Even if it does, I can't see it disadvantaging students too much, especially Cambridge applicants, where they interview the vast majority of people who apply there anyway.
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nexttime
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#79
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(Original post by Eva2)
To the administrators, someone that sends an open application is someone that is indecisive about what they want to do and where they want to go, which is a trait students can't afford to have at university. I'm not inventing this, I've been to several Oxbridge meetings within my college and they all say the same things. But if you really must chose a college, how do you do so? It's impossible to attend all open days and there isn't much information concerning the individual colleges.
Hmm maybe. If they weren't actual tutors i'd still dispute that though.

How do you do so?: prospectus has a little section on each college which can give you a general impression. The college website will have additional info for when you narrow your search a bit. The alternative prospectuses i find particularly good. You can visit a few colleges on the open day, and TSR is pretty good! What would you look for in particular?

For example, i went through the prospectus and eliminated any college that did not have 3 year accommodation and decided based on the other factors after that.

At the end of the day it will probably make little difference to whether you enjoy your time or not though, it must be said.

(Original post by MewMachine)
I've been to several at my college and they've told me the converse- making an open application won't disadvantage you in any way. In fact I don't think they even ask you why you applied to a college at interview? (because you may have been pooled, etc), though if I'm wrong, someone feel free to correct.
You're not . Or 'why Oxford' or 'why your subject'. EDIT: this seems to be specific to medicine.

(Original post by Eva2)
They do know, because they get the complete aplication form. Otherwise they wouldn't know whether you've made a choice or not, which wouldn't make much sense at all...
They don't know which college you applied to no.
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hey guysch im kl
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#80
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(Original post by Nick_000)
Question in title. :cookie:
Because Oxbridge don't want approx. double the number of applicants from the same sort of people (as presumably almost everyone who applies to one would apply to both), and have somehow managed to get UCAS to make an exemption for them but not the many other AAA courses/ unis in the country.
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