David Milliband's Education (Vis-à-vis Oxford) Watch

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LukeatForest
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#61
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#61
I don't know why people obsess over other people's education and cast such aspersions; it really is none of their business. It seems to me that he earned his place fairly and squarely and met an offer that was representative of offers in general at the time. That's not to say that the world is a fair place, and that money has no influence - I'm pretty sure that the opposite can be said for both of those things. However, unless some proof exists regarding money influencing certain individuals and their eventual education, I'll steer clear of the topic entirely and dwell forever in my lovely, lilac-coloured and rose-scented, ignorant bliss.

Seriously though, why did you take an interest in David Miliband? I know he looks quite dashing, a la James Bond, but I think if it were a love interest you'd have learned to spell his name .
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anonymous1432
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(Original post by oriel historian)
There is some truth in what you say but you have to be a little bit more diplomatic when you're making the point. For example, I got an AAA offer (comprehensive school, South Wales Valleys so not exactly y'know the height of social elite) and two others in my year got what worked out as ABB offers and even one that was about CCC (though translated from the German arbitur). The German fellow is a German Count, his family are Habsburg, and his great, great, great grandfather (or something) ruled the provisional government in 1848; the other - a British girl - who happens to be a cousin (2nd or 3rd I think, long time since they explained!) of the Queen and lives in a castle in yorkshire. The differences in grade offers are sometimes biased, though thankfully the tutor who did that has since retired and now it's a blanket AAA scheme.

I didn't want what you say to be dismissed as total rubbish because it isn't / wasn't.
I'm not trying to say that the upper classes are generally more favoured compared to working class, just that specific areas of British society get it easy regarding university admittance. The problem is that the majority of the people running the country are people from these areas.
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hobnob
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(Original post by aspiringlawyer)
Get out of your little bubble. Oxford and Cambridge aren't the only prestigious unis in the UK. The guy you were replying to said prestigious unis - not just Oxbridge.

Prince william got ABC and still managed to go on to study at St Andrews, a uni where the average offer is ususally far higher than that.
Sounds like an exception to me.
Yes, but he said so in the context of a thread dedicated to various wildly speculative theories about how David Milliband managed to get accepted by Corpus, in order to support the theory that he somehow bought his way in. St Andrews is quite irrelevant in that context. Nevertheless, even if you do extend the argument to "prestigious unis" in general, my point that Prince William is a bad example to use if you wish to argue those universities systematically discriminate against or in favour of particular groups of applicants, still stands. It isn't as though the "prestigious unis" were populated by hordes of inept royals, so why get so worked up about a handful of people who'll always be treated as special cases wherever they go?
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oriel historian
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(Original post by timwaters2007)
I'm not trying to say that the upper classes are generally more favoured compared to working class, just that specific areas of British society get it easy regarding university admittance. The problem is that the majority of the people running the country are people from these areas.
I wasn't adding to your argument merely adding some evidence to your points that Hobnob rubbished you for earlier....
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fake plastic love
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He went to Haverstock?! Oh my god that school is near me, it's terrible. No idea what it was like back then but now it's one of the worst in the borough.
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Speedbird2008
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#66
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Corpus Christi College, Oxford - First in Philosophy, Politics and Economics
MIT - S.M. degree in Political Science in 1990 at MIT (Kennedy Scholar)
Now that is a CV.
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ukstudent2011
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#67
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(Original post by fake plastic love)
He went to Haverstock?! Oh my god that school is near me, it's terrible. No idea what it was like back then but now it's one of the worst in the borough.
Yep. I know a few people that go there and my friend's mum teaches there. It is the second worst in the borough (ahead of my old school).
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Greatleysteg
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#68
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They used to have an entrance exam - after that, they didn't care what grades you got, because everyone sat the same entrance exam, their own distinguisher.
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anonymous1432
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Boris Johnson?
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Erradhadh
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#70
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It's called being from a certain sector of society: are people really THAT idealistic on :tsr:?
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Greatleysteg
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(Original post by 2 + 2 = 5)
I bet he only got in because he's a Cabinet minister.
Ha ha ha! :rofl:
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Quistis
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#72
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(Original post by timwaters2007)
I know quite a few people who have been accepted into Oxford who performed terribly in their A-Levels, but have incredibly rich fathers. Coincidence? No.
Could you elaborate on this?

I'm with oriel historian on this one: whilst there's no systematic discrimination in place at Oxford, and the university is making a real effort to attract more state school applicants, the freedom given to tutors by the admissions system definitely leaves itself open to abuse, and his story about the different offers given to students in his year illustrates that.
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Edmund Blackadder
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#73
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Miliband presumably entered Oxford around 1982 - in which time the number of universities has roughly doubled (maybe someone can dig out an exact figure?). Also, far fewer people bothered to go on to post-16 education - there simply wasn't the need for it, meaning that far fewer people would go to university.

I'd also hazard a guess that universities were much, much smaller in the early 80s, so I'd say that the number of people entering university could be as low as 1/3 of what it is today.

Mix in the issue of grade inflation and it's quite reasonable and totally believable that Miliband got into Oxford with 3 Bs and a D.
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soph!e
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#74
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The reason Miliband got in with lower grades is that he applied from an inner city comp under a program run by oxford to encourage the application of students from such poor quality school's whose grades maybe didn't fairly reflect their ability (as shown by his 1st/ scholarships / career)
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fake plastic love
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(Original post by LJoll)
Yep. I know a few people that go there and my friend's mum teaches there. It is the second worst in the borough (ahead of my old school).
Woo fellow Camden person.
I think it's improving since they got the new building but it still has an awful reputation. I never would've imagined them producing a cabinet member! Shows that anything can happen really...
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River85
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(Original post by timwaters2007)
This is the norm. When regarding the upper class, it's perfectly acceptable to allow a lesser gifted student a place at oxbridge, rather than a bright working class student. Money talks I'm afraid.
Erm...David Milliband isn't upper class? Is his father a lord? He's no more than middle class.

(Original post by timwaters2007)
At least I can revel in the fact that the country is being run by people who are not fit to get into Northampton, let alone Cambridge. No wonder our country is in the loo.
Hmmm...which is why Gordon Brown has a PhD from one of the most prestigious universities in the country (and also started his university studies early at the age of 16, I think)
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faber niger
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#77
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(Original post by timwaters2007)
Boris Johnson?
He got very good grades though. Admittedly because he went to Eton, but still.
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made_of_fail
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(Original post by LJoll)
I'm not sure why everyone seems to think that he was especially proveliged in his education. He went to Haverstock school which is pretty rough and gets quite bad grades.

Also, he is clearly an intelligent man, so perhaps his interviewers decided to pay attention to that obvious feature of his personality rather than focussing on a few letters on pieces of paper.

Anyway, their judgement has surely been vindicated since.
his dad was a pretty famous academic, so he was not educationally disadvantaged. And, anyway, "a few letters on pieces of paper" do tell you more about someone's academic potential than chatting to them for half an hour. Maybe in this case their judgment was vindicated but, generally, making special allowances for people who seem intelligent is not the best admissions policy.
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scaffy
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#79
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Hah, yeah, he's one of the very few famous people to have gone to corpus - the president had a good old ramble about how we had two ex-corpus people in the cabinent (him and his brother). I would assume that he got in because of a mix of the fact that 1.the uni did its own entrance exams then 2. grade inflation & his rubbishy school 3. possibly the access scheme someone else has mentioned (haven't heard of it - I'm taking their word here).
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soph!e
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(Original post by hobnob)
Oh do stop talking rubbish, otherwise some poor credulous soul might actually believe you.:rolleyes:
I'm not going to suggest this is the norm but a cambridge tutor told the mother of a friend of mine who is incredibly wealthy that, despite his poor grades an 'arrangement' could be made to get him in through the back door. He took it, got in but failed his first year exams and dropped out. There have been similar cases I'm sure but I doubt this is usual- most tutors have a conscience
I'm not being mean but there is no way he could have got in otherwise- poor GCSE's/ A-levels (ABB)/ he's dyslexic etc.
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