Turn on thread page Beta

How do you measure someone's intelligence? On GCSEs/A Levels? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kat2pult)
    You can be intelligent in a non-academic way, and this is the category I fit into.
    How inconvenient :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Slumpy)
    I think a good indicator of intelligence is the ability to express complex ideas simply, and in an easily understood way.
    Another one I'd go for is capability for creation, so original thought, art, music etc.
    The other one I'd go for is articulation, and clarity of thought and such.
    Though I feel mosti ntelligent people should do well in exams anyways.
    Very nicely put. I think that there are so many contributing factors to 'intelligence' and everyone's different.

    Generally, I judge people on how nice they are, for lack of a better adjective.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by serrellen)
    How inconvenient :P
    Absolutely, but then I'm favoured in other ways.

    For example, my bf, lovely though he is, is absolutely appalling at arithmetic. As are quite a few of these academically enhanced people. Myself, on the other hand, am favoured by this trait and can thus work out how to split food bills far more quickly and efficiently than my academic counterparts.


    ...luckily, my UCAS reference did say how I was more intelligent than my grades, so it's not too inconvenient :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    qualifications don't really measure intelligence and most people know this.

    However, they measure how hard you work and how much effort you put in.

    the latter is much more important than the former to employers on the whole

    intellect is worthless without the will to achieve

    i got AAAA
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kat2pult)
    Absolutely, but then I'm favoured in other ways.

    For example, my bf, lovely though he is, is absolutely appalling at arithmetic. As are quite a few of these academically enhanced people. Myself, on the other hand, am favoured by this trait and can thus work out how to split food bills far more quickly and efficiently than my academic counterparts.


    ...luckily, my UCAS reference did say how I was more intelligent than my grades, so it's not too inconvenient :P
    Universities may not see it quite the same way, unfortunately! But nice one on splitting the food bill :p:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by serrellen)
    Universities may not see it quite the same way, unfortunately! But nice one on splitting the food bill :p:
    I got offered places at Durham, Leicester, Lancaster, Kent and Hull despite having ***** GCSEs and CDD in my AS levels (before a million retakes in my A2 year). I didn't get the grades for Durham, didn't want to go to Kent so withdrew my offer, and still got places at York and Royal Holloway with CCCd! Apparently, I have 'potential'! *beams and feels proud* lol.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I think IQ is a pretty good measure of how intelligent someone is, rather than going by exam results. I have had my IQ calculated properly, mine is in the "superior" range, and yet my AS results were average and I never took my A2s.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I had an I.Q.-test administered at the age of 10 which concluded that I am 'intellectually-superior' (though superior to what is anyone's guess).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Who was it who said

    '10% inspiration, 90% perspiration'

    He must be pretty sweaty :P
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yuuki)
    Well, I was thinking about what it 'meant' by being clever. Could it be about having super duper memory? Or someone who is a straight A-student?

    Discuss
    I don't measure peoples' intelligence by GCSEs and A Levels, etc. For example, my cousin, same age as me, didn't do too well in GCSEs apparently, whereas mine were OK so I went on to 6th form... but she's the one to ask in my family if you want to know something about cars/how to fix them. So I wouldn't say she's unintelligent, she just knows about different things :yep: ... I wouldn't know where to start if you told me to fix a car. :nah:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I find a girl that can talk and communicate well mmm. But intelligence can be measured by different things.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There's 7 different types of intelligence, IQ only measures 3 of them and exam results are no real indicator of intelligence either.

    The 7 types are:

    Logical/Mathematical: probably the closest to the traditional idea of intelligence, manifested by a facility for science, puzzles, and math, estimating and planning.

    Linguistic: manifested by the ability to acquire language and fluency in discussion, people with high linguistic intelligence enjoy lively debate, writing letters, books, poetry and verse, and filling out forms.

    Spatial: the ability to mentally map or picture the environment, a process, or a concept, spatially intelligent people can easily visualize and manipulate shapes, are highly observant, have a good sense of direction, can easily follow diagrams and assemble furniture or other do-it-yourself projects.

    Musical: musically intelligent people not only have the facility for creating, remembering or replaying tunes or the playing an instrument, but can associate those tunes with other facts as a learning or memorization tool.

    Body-kinesthetic: those with high kinesthetic intelligence are well-coordinated, work well with their hands, and are high-energy on-the-go people who learn through example and hands-on experience (trial and error); physically imitation. Associated professions would be as diverse as athletes, typists, carpenters, craftspersons, and dancers.

    Interpersonal: the facility for understanding and cooperating other people, to notice and appreciate what affects others; sensitivity. They are good listeners and group leaders and participants; social butterflies; nurturers. Highly interpersonally intelligent people make excellent teachers, nurses, salespersons, politicians, and diplomats.

    Intrapersonal: the facility for looking within oneself, of understanding one's own emotions and motivations. Highly intrapersonally intelligent people do not make quick, rash decisions and often enjoy solitary pursuits and hobbies. They often keep a journal and diary.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Through conversations you have with them.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jgoggs1)
    Well in my opinion, cleverness and intelligence are separate concepts; there are those who have a head for figures, dates, numbers etc., is painstakingly precise and can ace exams for fun. They are clever, and good luck to them. Intelligence implies an independence of thought, some inherent ingenuity, creativity, and mental autonomy. An intelligent person will write a symphony, and a clever person will point where the missing barlines are.
    I agree completely.
    :yep:
    I am not clever. I do stupid things... one time I put clothes in the washing machine and wondered why, 5 minutes later, it wasn't on. I'd forgotten to switch it on! I can't do mental maths to save my life. However, when it comes to looking at something in a completely different way and analysing, I can do that. My brain just functions differently to other people's brains, at least that's what I tell myself! :p:

    Edit:

    Linguistic: manifested by the ability to acquire language and fluency in discussion, people with high linguistic intelligence enjoy lively debate, writing letters, books, poetry and verse, and filling out forms.

    Who actually enjoys filling out forms? :rofl:
    Apart from that, pretty accurate.


    Interpersonal: the facility for understanding and cooperating other people, to notice and appreciate what affects others; sensitivity. They are good listeners and group leaders and participants; social butterflies; nurturers. Highly interpersonally intelligent people make excellent teachers, nurses, salespersons, politicians, and diplomats.

    Intrapersonal: the facility for looking within oneself, of understanding one's own emotions and motivations. Highly intrapersonally intelligent people do not make quick, rash decisions and often enjoy solitary pursuits and hobbies. They often keep a journal and diary.

    Check, check & check.

    If only I was musically intelligent....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    watch the apprentice those people are meant to be the smartest but they are very stupid.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My eldest sister was a straight A student all the way through School & Uni. She is an accountant.

    She is genuinely one of the least intelligent people i have ever known. At age 19, she believed the sun to orbit the earth. She has absoloutely no ingenuiety. I expose her stupidity with every comment she makes.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Not on GCSEs and A levels, no. A lot is just memory for those types of exams - can't measure intelligence on GCSEs for sure!

    I suppose you'd have to go about defining intelligence first.

    Like one of my friends is really intelligent but she didn't do too well in A levels etc as she didn't bother trying etc.
    Offline

    13
    by giving them phd mathematics and see how they cope i.e. if they go mental etc.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by Nude)
    My eldest sister was a straight A student all the way through School & Uni. She is an accountant.

    She is genuinely one of the least intelligent people i have ever known. At age 19, she believed the sun to orbit the earth. She has absoloutely no ingenuiety. I expose her stupidity with every comment she makes.
    How did she get an A in GCSE Physics then? I'm sure that to get an A in GCSE Physics you should at least know that the earth orbits the sun! :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    How did she get an A in GCSE Physics then? I'm sure that to get an A in GCSE Physics you should at least know that the earth orbits the sun! :rolleyes:
    haha yes i suppose. But in my gcses i simply learned the stuff 20 mins before, repeated it and did well. GCSEs, and a levels to ma lesser extent, do not measure your intelligence at all. ANd this is, i believe, not a problem. After all, if you're an employer you'd rather have a ditsy girl who does what you tell her working for you than a genius who always undermines you. These exams are about measuring how hard you work and that is all as far as i'm concerned.

    Degrees on the other hand i'd say probably measure intellect as much as effort but they are miles bayond gcse and a levels. I got 4 as at AS (highest in year in 3) and great gcses but i'd quite confidently say that there are at least 6 people in my college classes who are much more intelligent than i am. I just have a natural talent for exams lol.

    intelligence=/=academic.
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.