Is Engineering Badly Paid And A Dead End? Watch

EdwardCurrent
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#61
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#61
(Original post by FTC199)
meh i was just quoting my lecturer the other day, what does he know? he's only a professor :p:
What are you talking about? Whoever said it, it is clearly nonsense. Use your head.
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FTC199
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#62
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(Original post by Higgy90)
and then we look at the times:

1 Cambridge
2 Oxford
3 Imperial College
4 University College London
=4 Newcastle
6 Aberdeen
=6 Edinburgh
8 Glasgow
.
.
.
18 Dundee


That goes to show how BAD these tables are. if you honestly believe that Dundee is better for medicine than oxbridge you need your head looked at LOL
dundee has a hospital, oxford doesnt

and hospitals are where MEDICINE is practiced, therefore they are pretty important. anyway, oxford doesnt give you a medical degree, it gives you a pre-clinical medical degree, you graduate from a different uni in the end

i would never want to go to oxbridge for a medical degree anyway because of the pre-clinical/clinical split. you learn far more putting these things into practice than you do learning them as theory and then putting them into practe a year or two later when you have forgotten them
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FTC199
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#63
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(Original post by EdwardCurrent)
What are you talking about? Whoever said it, it is clearly nonsense. Use your head.
i do use my head. i know it isnt a "language" but medicine has a hell of a lot of new words in it that most people dont know (oocyte, spermatozoa, primordial germ cell, granulosa cells, preantral follicle are a few off the top of my head)
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bean87
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#64
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#64
(Original post by FTC199)
i do use my head. i know it isnt a "language" but medicine has a hell of a lot of new words in it that most people dont know (oocyte, spermatozoa, primordial germ cell, granulosa cells, preantral follicle are a few off the top of my head)
whats a cell?
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FTC199
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#65
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#65
(Original post by bean87)
whats a cell?
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Barry Chuckle
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#66
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#66
(Original post by EdwardCurrent)
If it's money you want, there are far better career options for you. If you don't have the engineering spark I can easily see how a degree in engineering could turn out to be a soul-destroying experience. Hell, I consider myself to have the spark, and for me it's almost been a soul-destroying experience!
Why do you say that?
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Magnanimity
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#67
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#67
(Original post by FTC199)
i do use my head. i know it isnt a "language" but medicine has a hell of a lot of new words in it that most people dont know (oocyte, spermatozoa, primordial germ cell, granulosa cells, preantral follicle are a few off the top of my head)
I agree. Some essays I write barely use basic english, rather just medical/dental jargon. It's amazing how easily you get to the point that you can't explain things in simple non-medical terms LOL. And you talk to your medical/dental colleagues in this "language".
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EdwardCurrent
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#68
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#68
(Original post by FTC199)
i do use my head. i know it isnt a "language" but medicine has a hell of a lot of new words in it that most people dont know (oocyte, spermatozoa, primordial germ cell, granulosa cells, preantral follicle are a few off the top of my head)
And so what? So does engineering, so does any other subject. To claim that you are essentially studying a language degree in tandem with a medicine degree is absurd. The reality is that you are learning a bunch of new words. Nothing more, nothing less.

This whole thread has got a bit out of hand. Who cares whether medicine or engineering has a more 'difficult' first year? It's an idiotic discussion. I'm sure I would find medicine far more difficult than engineering, simply because I have no interest in it. I dare say the same applies to a majority of medics.
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Profesh
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#69
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(Original post by Snobpence17)
I didn't realise there was a coloured version of this
You wouldn't believe how long it took me to find a suitable shade of blue for the sky.
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Profesh
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#70
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#70
(Original post by bluenoxid)
Yup

Its working
Its broken
We're going to get sued :yep:
Only if our nation's lawyers don't all resign en masse in favour of re-training as engineers. Which, with the advent of this thread, is a very real possibility.
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KwungSun
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#71
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#71
(Original post by FTC199)
dundee has a hospital, oxford doesnt

and hospitals are where MEDICINE is practiced, therefore they are pretty important. anyway, oxford doesnt give you a medical degree, it gives you a pre-clinical medical degree, you graduate from a different uni in the end

i would never want to go to oxbridge for a medical degree anyway because of the pre-clinical/clinical split. you learn far more putting these things into practice than you do learning them as theory and then putting them into practe a year or two later when you have forgotten them
Of course Oxford has a hospital, what are you talking about?

OP: Even if engineering is a dead end (I'm not saying it is) an engineering DEGREE certainly is NOT a dead end. Excepting medicine and dentistry you can get into any high paying profession you choose with an engineering background.
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FTC199
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(Original post by EdwardCurrent)
And so what? So does engineering, so does any other subject. To claim that you are essentially studying a language degree in tandem with a medicine degree is absurd. The reality is that you are learning a bunch of new words. Nothing more, nothing less.
i was quoting a lecturer, give it a rest. it is true that medical/dental degrees do have a lot of learning of new words in them though - we have to know every bone in the body plus muscles etc
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im so academic
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#73
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#73
Medicine or Engineering? Why not get the best of both worlds - a biomedical engineer OP?
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BadExaminee
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#74
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(Original post by Mush)
It depends largely on the kind of life you want to have.

If you want to be 100% money orientated and you don't care what ******** job/conditions you have to endure, then you should be a dentist or a doctor. You'll earn vast amounts of money but you'll have no free time and you'll likely be single until your late 30s/early 40s when you'll snag a woman who's in it for the money.

120,000 a year is a brilliant wage, and that's the high end of what you can expect from medicine/dentistry as a senior consultant(after maybe 20 years of practicing). But is it worth it?

I would gladly PAY 70,000 a year NOT to be a Doctor/Dentist... suicide and drug addiction rates indicate that it's not a great profession...

The high end of Engineering is typically between 50,000 and 75,000 for a 'senior' consultant (after maybe 10-15 years of practicing, less is possible).

But as far as 'variation' and 'progression' goes, there's no limits in Engineering. That's the point. Engineering is limitless. In medicine/dentistry you are confined to being a slave to the public, who largely don't appreciate your work. Name 10 famous Engineers... easy, right? Name 10 famous Medical Doctors(Non-Fictional!!!!)... you can't do it, can you? The world appreciates engineering fiats more than medical fiats. In medicine your job is to keep people alive - save people, there's no much room for expansion outside that... that's just what it is! Engineering is everything. Engineering is coming up with new ideas to further the advancement of human race and technology. And that ranges from building a machine that saves people's lives, to an aircraft that fuels future travel, to an energy resource that saves the planet... there's more room for progression than you can imagine

Engineers change the way the world works, doctors keep people alive, dentists keep your teeth healthy.
aahhhhh... I feel soooo confident and reassured now... I am a DAMN ENGINEER people !! Yeahhhhh :woo:
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Profesh
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#75
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#75
(Original post by bean87)
haha retard
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Charlski
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#76
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(Original post by FTC199)
dundee has a hospital, oxford doesnt

and hospitals are where MEDICINE is practiced, therefore they are pretty important. anyway, oxford doesnt give you a medical degree, it gives you a pre-clinical medical degree, you graduate from a different uni in the end

i would never want to go to oxbridge for a medical degree anyway because of the pre-clinical/clinical split. you learn far more putting these things into practice than you do learning them as theory and then putting them into practe a year or two later when you have forgotten them

http://www.oxfordradcliffe.nhs.uk/findus/jr.aspx


"The JR, which has 616 beds, is the largest of the Trust’s hospitals. It houses many departments of Oxford University Medical School, and is the base for most medical students who are trained throughout the Trust. "
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FTC199
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#77
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(Original post by KwungSun)
Of course Oxford has a hospital, what are you talking about?
oxford students have to go somewhere else for their clinical years. it is the same as st andrews
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EdwardCurrent
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#78
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(Original post by Barry Chuckle)
Why do you say that?
Because it does no justice to what engineering is really about. I can't stand being preached at, and I just find it generally dry, boring, prescribed and terribly contrived.
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KwungSun
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I think people on here are grossly overestimating the returns to a medical degree. Medicine is not a ticket to fast money, you will not be earning big money until you reach consultant level (unless you are a GP) and even then "big" means something like 90k. You are also by no means guaranteed to ever become a consultant. There are plenty of registrars in their 50s about.
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KwungSun
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#80
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#80
(Original post by FTC199)
oxford students have to go somewhere else for their clinical years. it is the same as st andrews
From oxford website:

"Clinical study
Years 4 to 6 of the six-year course comprise the clinical component and leads to the award of the BM, BCh.

Most teaching takes place in the hospitals and general practices in Oxford, but with an important element taking place in other centres in the Oxford Teaching Network, primarily Northampton, Swindon and Reading. The Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust provides a local service as well as acting as a regional referral centre for speciality treatment. The other hospitals in the Teaching Network are busy district general hospitals."

That is no more travelling than you would need to do if you were at any of the London medical schools, for instance.
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