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Old banger at <£500 watch

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    (Original post by epoxi)
    Essentially yes: £2,000 will buy a 2004 Corsa, £500 won't buy a working car from this century! The new Corsa is safer and is in a lower insurance group than the same engine of the previous generation.

    When you're 17 this makes a huge difference in insurance premiums, plus the new Corsa will me more efficient, more environmentally friendly (hence lower tax) and less likely to break down: if your £500 car breaks down you'll have to buy another because the repair bill will be more than the car! If you consider the saving you make over a couple of years, plus the benefits you gain from a newer car, it seems unreasonable to buy an 'old banger.'

    Like Stomm said, even if you just increase your budget to £1,000 you get MANY more options than the £500, and much newer cars (e.g. 2003 Punto or Micra), but I would say £2,000 is the optimum spend.

    Seriously, if £500 extra is going to hurt you, get ready to have your heart broken by running costs.
    i think Yo momma has spoilt you with cars....
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    (Original post by Jarve99)
    ...My dad bought a 2 litre Primera GT 147bhp with an expensive stereo, induction kit and alloys for £1500 on around 80,000 miles. The SR20de(whichever varient) engine is bomb proof...
    I strongly agree with you that Japanese cars are more reliable, but you have to admit that a Nissan built in 2003 would be less likely to break down than your dad's. Also, modifications tend to decrease the value of the car because the average person doesn't want them, and it gives the impression that the car has been ragged (although I did not shy away from them when getting my car, because I know this isn't strictly true).

    What I am trying to get across is that running a car costs a ridiculous amount (£1,500+ just for a 17 year old male to get it on the road for a year...excluding petrol), not to mention driving lessons if you had an instructor!

    This is how much you pay for insurance, tax and MOT: these are intangible, consumable things which you don't even last very long. So why not spend more on the car? Spending slightly more on the car is an investment that will pay off through lower maintenance costs and less pain throughout your ownership.

    @Lara: I could bang on all day about how I've never had nice things like the other kids had until now, but instead all I'm going to say is you don't know me, so please don't call me spoilt.
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    Essentially yes: £2,000 will buy a 2004 Corsa, £500 won't buy a working car from this century! The new Corsa is safer and is in a lower insurance group than the same engine of the previous generation.

    When you're 17 this makes a huge difference in insurance premiums, plus the new Corsa will me more efficient, more environmentally friendly (hence lower tax) and less likely to break down: if your £500 car breaks down you'll have to buy another because the repair bill will be more than the car! If you consider the saving you make over a couple of years, plus the benefits you gain from a newer car, it seems unreasonable to buy an 'old banger.'
    .
    Not necessarily true. I was looking at a 2000 1.4 civic the tax is £120. The same car made after march 2001 is £145. This is because after March 2001 it goes by Co2. If a car was registered before March 2001 then car tax is based only on the engine size, with one rate for engine sizes up to 1549cc and one for engines over 1549cc
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    (Original post by mr_cool)
    Not necessarily true. I was looking at a 2000 1.4 civic the tax is £120. The same car made after march 2001 is £145. This is because after March 2001 it goes by Co2. If a car was registered before March 2001 then car tax is based only on the engine size, with one rate for engine sizes up to 1549cc and one for engines over 1549cc
    Fair enough.

    I'm sure the new model Civic has lower emissions though (not that anyone can buy it for £5,000, let alone £500!).
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    @Lara: I could bang on all day about how I've never had nice things like the other kids had until now, but instead all I'm going to say is you don't know me, so please don't call me spoilt.
    well i have no idea where you get your ideas from but your completely wrong. there are plenty of very decent, reliable, economic motors out there for under 2k. under 1k. and even under £500! for you to dismiss that shows that youve either got no experience with cheap cars and what you actually get for your money these days, or youve just been brought up on 2-3 year old cars and think that anything pre-2001 is ancient and a liability - which is absolute rubbish.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    well i have no idea where you get your ideas from but your completely wrong. there are plenty of very decent, reliable, economic motors out there for under 2k. under 1k. and even under £500! for you to dismiss that shows that youve either got no experience with cheap cars and what you actually get for your money these days, or youve just been brought up on 2-3 year old cars and think that anything pre-2001 is ancient and a liability - which is absolute rubbish.
    My parents' cars have always been second hand (apart from the Espace), and have been owned for at least seven years. In the case of our Saab 9000 and Renault Espace they immediately started having serious problems at their 10th birthdays.

    Saying that, the Daihatsu Charade (sold at 10 years old) and Mitsubishi Carisma were bulletproof though, and the '97 Carisma despite being in two crashes is still going today (gave it to grandparents).

    But no matter how reliable the car, you can't deny that a newer model will be more reliable. All it takes is one breakdown, and you're screwed: you'll have to buy another...or face the huge bill, so buying a newer example minimises the risk.

    Though I think a clear pattern's emerging: buy Japanese.
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    Or German
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    (Original post by Stomm)
    Or German
    Not a Mercedes: my mum has a 2001 A-Class at the moment: major break down at least twice a year since buying it in 2002...I have no idea why she's kept it past the warranty. Plus when the warranty applied, the Mercedes Garage was far from helpful.
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    My parents' cars have always been second hand (apart from the Espace), and have been owned for at least seven years. In the case of our Saab 9000 and Renault Espace they immediately started having serious problems at their 10th birthdays.

    Saying that, the Daihatsu Charade (sold at 10 years old) and Mitsubishi Carisma were bulletproof though, and the '97 Carisma despite being in two crashes is still going today (gave it to grandparents).

    But no matter how reliable the car, you can't deny that a newer model will be more reliable. All it takes is one breakdown, and you're screwed: you'll have to buy another...or face the huge bill, so buying a newer example minimises the risk.

    Though I think a clear pattern's emerging: buy Japanese.
    no offense mate but your talking absolute rubbish. newer models arent always more reliable at all, theres many cases where older well designed engines out milaging many new engines before anything other than a routine service part is needed. id much rather put my faith in a 15 year old diesel merc than a 3 year old corsa. also, when a older car breaks down, it just means that the parts are going to be redily available if not just bought from a scrap yard at the fraction of the cost. its highly unlkely in this day and age and any car made within the last 20 years which is maintained properly to just break and need scrapping. if you buy a £500 car made within the last 15 years which has not been abused, has no major rust problems, then it will serve you as good as any 1 year old car ever will.
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    (Original post by epoxi)

    But no matter how reliable the car, you can't deny that a newer model will be more reliable. All it takes is one breakdown, and you're screwed: you'll have to buy another...or face the huge bill, so buying a newer example minimises the risk.
    Personally, I think you're talking out your arse.

    I've been driving 30+ year old cars for years. Not once have any of them failed to make it to the intended destination.
    If anything, older cars are more reliable because they are more simple. Simple = less to go wrong.
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    Not a Mercedes: my mum has a 2001 A-Class at the moment: major break down at least twice a year since buying it in 2002...I have no idea why she's kept it past the warranty. Plus when the warranty applied, the Mercedes Garage was far from helpful.
    well if your mum had a problem with the one car she bought which is 9 years old and the bottom of the range model then it must surely mean Mercedes arent worth a dime? :rolleyes:

    my mum has a '58 A-class and although its only got a few hundred miles on it, it runs perfectly well. i guess with your logic she should sell it and buy a newer, 09 japanese car so it wont break down? :p:
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    well if your mum had a problem with the one car she bought which is 9 years old and the bottom of the range model then it must surely mean Mercedes arent worth a dime? :rolleyes:

    my mum has a '58 A-class and although its only got a few hundred miles on it, it runs perfectly well. i guess with your logic she should sell it and buy a newer, 09 japanese car so it wont break down? :p:

    I'd bin the A-Class in favour of a shopping trolley. Once again this is one of the cars I've hired in the past, and quite frankly I've driven better Fiats, and that's bloody saying something.

    This is the former model though, I know that a new one came out a year or so ago. I'm afraid that I'm not a huge petrol-head, I do watch Top Gear though


    Oh and the A-Class was I thought good for turning corners, one of my mates who was on holiday with me insists that it wasn't. Either way I was happy to swap it for the Alpha 156 as soon as I could, much better for zipping around Tuscany...
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    (Original post by Stomm)
    I'd bin the A-Class in favour of a shopping trolley. Once again this is one of the cars I've hired in the past, and quite frankly I've driven better Fiats, and that's bloody saying something.

    This is the former model though, I know that a new one came out a year or so ago. I'm afraid that I'm not a huge petrol-head, I do watch Top Gear though

    Oh and the A-Class was I thought good for turning corners, one of my mates who was on holiday with me insists that it wasn't. Either way I was happy to swap it for the Alpha 156 as soon as I could, much better for zipping around Tuscany...
    well watching top gear doesnt make you a petrol head, its a commedy/factual programme about motoring with the factual bit dummed right down so the population can watch it. still a epic show though. just not what youd class a petrol head for watching!

    have you ever actually owned a car or just hired shopping trollys for the odd holiday? my mum isnt a petrol head she just needs something that will get her and my sister to town and stuff when she wants. and it fits that bill perfectly. plus she likes it, which is a bonus.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    well if your mum had a problem with the one car she bought which is 9 years old and the bottom of the range model then it must surely mean Mercedes arent worth a dime? :rolleyes:
    Both the A-Class and ML-Class of this generation came bottom in a JD Power survey for customer statisfaction...and no other Benz was anywhere near the top, so I would go as far to say Mercedes from this generation are pretty pathetic. However I'm sure Mercedes would have tried to turn this around by now for fear of losing their reputation.

    This also begs the question, if buying a newer car is such a bad option according to you, why are you defending your mother's purchase of a brand new car? According to you: a £500 car, which is more reliable, will take her to town just as well.

    Driving a new A-Class out of the showroom takes in excess of £4,000 out of its value.
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    Both the A-Class and ML-Class of this generation came bottom in a JD Power survey for customer statisfaction...and no other Benz was anywhere near the top, so I would go as far to say Mercedes from this generation are pretty pathetic. However I'm sure Mercedes would have tried to turn this around by now for fear of losing their reputation.

    This also begs the question, if buying a newer car is such a bad option according to you, why are you defending your mother's purchase of a brand new car? According to you: a £500 car, which is more reliable, will take her to town just as well.

    Driving a new A-Class out of the showroom takes in excess of £4,000 out of its value.
    when did i say new cars are a bad option? pretty sure all ive said is that your idea that cars worth less than 2k are rubbish, is, well, total rubbish.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    well watching top gear doesnt make you a petrol head, its a commedy/factual programme about motoring with the factual bit dummed right down so the population can watch it. still a epic show though. just not what youd class a petrol head for watching!
    I did say that I wasn't a petrol-head, I have changed the starter motor on my VW Beetle and if I had a garage then it might still be on the road. Part of the charm of the VW Beetle is its simplicity, I once fixed the engine using a rubber band...

    (Original post by Lara C.)
    have you ever actually owned a car or just hired shopping trollys for the odd holiday? my mum isnt a petrol head she just needs something that will get her and my sister to town and stuff when she wants. and it fits that bill perfectly. plus she likes it, which is a bonus.
    Well as I said above I have a VW Beetle, but that's been of the road for years now. My wife owns 'the family car', simply because she's had continuous insurance cover and a nice big no-claims bonus. Oh and she's only got an automatic license, which limits things a bit...

    When we first got together she had a Golf, then in '02 we got a six month old New Beetle, and we finally changed that at the begining of last year for a '56 Passat Estate as whilst there was nothing wrong with the Beetle, you just can't fit a toddler, baby, two adults and all the stuff that goes with it into the car.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    when did i say new cars are a bad option? pretty sure all ive said is that your idea that cars worth less than 2k are rubbish, is, well, total rubbish.
    Not once, at any point, have I said that any old car is rubbish.

    All I've ever suggested is that you can make a saving in the long run by spending slightly more on a newer car.
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    Not once, at any point, have I said that any old car is rubbish.

    All I've ever suggested is that you can make a saving in the long run by spending slightly more on a newer car.
    slightly more, so your saying a car worth £500 is a waste of time?
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    (Original post by epoxi)
    Not once, at any point, have I said that any old car is rubbish.

    All I've ever suggested is that you can make a saving in the long run by spending slightly more on a newer car.
    slightly more, so your saying a car worth £500 is a waste of time?
    As you can tell from what you just quoted me on, you know exactly what I'm trying to say.

    £500 cars are far from a waste of time: plenty of amazing cars can be bought for a pocket full of cash e.g. J.C.'s example of an old school E-Class, or my personal favourites: the Charade Gtti, Nissan Pulsar or Swift GTi.

    Someone's trying to look for an argument. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by epoxi)
    As you can tell from what you just quoted me on, you know exactly what I'm trying to say.

    £500 cars are far from a waste of time: plenty of amazing cars can be bought for a pocket full of cash e.g. J.C.'s example of an old school E-Class, or my personal favourites: the Charade Gtti, Nissan Pulsar or Swift GTi.

    Someone's trying to look for an argument. :rolleyes:
    strange because somebody with your username posted this in the same thread;

    "If you can't afford to buy a slightly more expensive car (i.e. £2,000) maybe you should ask yourself can you afford a car at all?"

    implying a car worth £500 isnt worth having!

    "if your £500 car breaks down you'll have to buy another because the repair bill will be more than the car!"

    again. implying a £500 car will just break down and isnt worth repairing.
 
 
 
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