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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Same! I hate ray diagrams and electricity and magnets
    Magnetism is awesome I didn't really like it until I watched khanacademy's video on it though, things tend to become significantly more awesome when FP3 vectors are chucked in
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    (Original post by techno836)
    hahaha well its true :L ... I find it a waste of money tbqh



    no they're fine my teacher just said year 11 summer resits :/
    seriously?
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    (Original post by Bluffroom)
    seriously?
    seriously .... now I may be wrong but i'm just repeating his words, so because I know no more I shall withdraw my case
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    (Original post by techno836)
    I like the ray diagrams .. although drawing an optical fibre without a protractor is annoying -.-
    Yes magnets and electricity ... my hatred runs deep !

    I learned spearmans rank correlation coefficient other day expecting it to be hard :facepalm: .... so boring :L (its harder to say the name )
    Meh :hand:

    SRCC doing it for.my stats coursework :rolleyes:
    (Original post by justinawe)
    Magnetism is awesome I didn't really like it until I watched khanacademy's video on it though, things tend to become significantly more awesome when FP3 vectors are chucked in
    It's taught as such basics it's hard...
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    (Original post by techno836)
    seriously .... now I may be wrong but i'm just repeating his words, so because I know no more I shall withdraw my case
    I don't understand how it would make sense seeing as GCSEs can be finished in either year 10 or 11. If you screw up in summer yr11 and you needed it then it would make sense but...
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    It's taught as such basics it's hard...
    Fleming's left hand rule or whatever it's called is for noobs... I just visualize the vector cross product
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Fleming's left hand rule or whatever it's called is for noobs... I just visualize the vector cross product
    Ooh, explain!!!
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    (Original post by MattFletcher)
    Oh the YearBook! we get it on the last day!
    awwh we have to buy ours and we can put pictures, memories and ask people to sign i have just recently started i have already used 10 pages
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Ooh, explain!!!
    Well, first you'll need to wrap your head around the first page of FP3 vectors:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    Name:  page103.jpg
Views: 36
Size:  126.0 KB


    You only really need to understand the top half of that page.
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    (Original post by Muni :D)
    awwh we have to buy ours and we can put pictures, memories and ask people to sign i have just recently started i have already used 10 pages
    We've already paid. We all have pictures in it, friendship group pictures and a whole year one. And get people to sign at the back

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Well, first you'll need to wrap your head around the first page of FP3 vectors:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    Name:  page103.jpg
Views: 36
Size:  126.0 KB


    You only really need to understand the top half of that page.
    Okay, now what?
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    Exams getting closer...
    • TSR Support Team
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    TSR Support Team
    Just had my General and Credit math exams, both the General non-calculator and calculator exams were easy as usual but the Credit non-calculator was surprisingly easy and the calculator exam was alright up until the last question - which I completely gave up on.
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    Improved my Geography controlled assessment from an C to an A in one day :woo:
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    (Original post by Elm Tree)
    Improved my Geography controlled assessment from an C to an A in one day :woo:
    Nice! What you on for Geography?

    I did it a year early and got a high B
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Okay, now what?
    Well, this is easier to remember for A-level Physics because you have a simplified version of this formula there, but I'll try to explain it anyway.

    \vec{F} = I(\vec{\ell} \times \vec{B})

    This is for a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field.

    F is the force on the wire, I is the current, l is the length of the wire, B is the magnetic field strength.

    Now, afaik current is neither a scalar nor a vector, so just treat it as a "value". So it doesn't really matter here.

    For GCSE and A-level purposes, it is assumed the wire is at right angles to the magnetic field. And for A-level (I don't think this formula is used for GCSE), only the magnitude matters.

    So,

    F = I(\ell B \sin 90^{\circ})

    sin 90 as they're at right angles.

    This simplifies too:

    F = BI\ell

    This is the standard formula given for A2 Physics.

    Now, look at the vector formula. Observe the cross product in the brackets.

    Look at the diagram on the page of the FP3 book I gave you.

    The diagram of n-hat, a and b.

    l can be taken as a here, B can be taken as b, and F would be n-hat.

    The angle between l and B (a and b) would obviously be 90 degrees, since as said before, at GCSE/A-level you're only looking at when the wire and magnetic field are at right angles.

    Now, l is the length of the wire. The current travels along the length of the wire. So this can be taken as the direction that the current flows in.

    So, again, the diagram of a, b and n-hat. n-hat is still F, b is still B. Now, a is I rather than l.

    This diagram is basically what "Fleming's left-hand rule" is trying to demonstrate.

    I'd recommend watching khanacademy's videos on magnetism if you don't get this. However, they don't say how the left-hand rule is derived (I figured this out on my own ). Watch those and re-read by post and you'll get it for sure (assuming you don't already get it).
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    (Original post by Leechayy)
    Nice! What you on for Geography?

    I did it a year early and got a high B
    An A I guess

    We have two exams in June
    Oh do you mean exam board? if so then AQA
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Well, this is easier to remember for A-level Physics because you have a simplified version of this formula there, but I'll try to explain it anyway.

    \vec{F} = I(\vec{\ell} \times \vec{B})

    This is for a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field.

    F is the force on the wire, I is the current, l is the length of the wire, B is the magnetic field strength.

    Now, afaik current is neither a scalar nor a vector, so just treat it as a "value". So it doesn't really matter here.

    For GCSE and A-level purposes, it is assumed the wire is at right angles to the magnetic field. And for A-level (I don't think this formula is used for GCSE), only the magnitude matters.

    So,

    F = I(\ell B \sin 90^{\circ})

    sin 90 as they're at right angles.

    This simplifies too:

    F = BI\ell

    This is the standard formula given for A2 Physics.

    Now, look at the vector formula. Observe the cross product in the brackets.

    Look at the diagram on the page of the FP3 book I gave you.

    The diagram of n-hat, a and b.

    l can be taken as a here, B can be taken as b, and F would be n-hat.

    The angle between l and B (a and b) would obviously be 90 degrees, since as said before, at GCSE/A-level you're only looking at when the wire and magnetic field are at right angles.

    Now, l is the length of the wire. The current travels along the length of the wire. So this can be taken as the direction that the current flows in.

    So, again, the diagram of a, b and n-hat. n-hat is still F, b is still B. Now, a is I rather than l.

    This diagram is basically what "Fleming's left-hand rule" is trying to demonstrate.

    I'd recommend watching khanacademy's videos on magnetism if you don't get this. However, they don't say how the left-hand rule is derived (I figured this out on my own ). Watch those and re-read by post and you'll get it for sure (assuming you don't already get it).
    I think I get it, do you have the link?
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    I've seen this so many times since march yet I can't stop laughing when i see it :rofl:
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I think I get it, do you have the link?
    https://www.khanacademy.org/science/...-and-magnetism

    "Magnetism 5" is where this formula features - I'd recommend you watch "Magnetism 2" first, though, because he derives the formula I gave you from the formula he presents in "Magnetism 2".

    In short, just watch 2 and 5
 
 
 
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