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    (Original post by Yezi_L)
    Sure that c) (a^2+b^2) -r is greater than 1 is true when the centre of the second circle lies outside the first. But consider another position here:
    When the two circles are concentric, root(a^2+b^2) +r is less than 1 means that the second circle is inside the first, so they won't intersect. By the way, you're also applying for Maths&Philosophy aren't you? I replied in the other thread but I'm not sure if you've seen it.

    I never actually thought about it that way. Indeed, if r is very small and a,b lies within the circle then it will not intersect. In this case I really don't know what to think :eek:

    Just saw it now, i'll reply now
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    Anyone from Scotland applying to Oxford to do Mathematics?
    Does anyone have a good understanding of how Higher Mathematics (AS level equivalent) compares to the material in the MAT?
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    (Original post by BeltonianNewt)
    Anyone from Scotland applying to Oxford to do Mathematics?
    Does anyone have a good understanding of how Higher Mathematics (AS level equivalent) compares to the material in the MAT?
    Have you had a look at the syllabus for MAT on the Oxford website? Here it is if you haven't.
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    (Original post by yl95)
    SO glad I don't have to do Q4, teehee. I get the easy Q6. Geometry ain't my thing.
    I am incredibly jealous of you - Q4 is definitely my weakest
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    (Original post by bluebell_flames)
    I am incredibly jealous of you - Q4 is definitely my weakest
    I never tried in Q4 when I was doing MAT practice for straight Maths but I doubt I'd want to...maybe I'll have a go later. :P

    Is it weird that I find the MAT quite...fun? :O
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    (Original post by yl95)
    I never tried in Q4 when I was doing MAT practice for straight Maths but I doubt I'd want to...maybe I'll have a go later. :P

    Is it weird that I find the MAT quite...fun? :O
    Hehe - only a little I enjoy the multiple choice questions and sometimes 2/3/5, but 4 is just a nightmare
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    Has anyone else started to really panic now? The MAT is so soon (~61 hours to go :eek:)
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    (Original post by bluebell_flames)
    Hehe - only a little I enjoy the multiple choice questions and sometimes 2/3/5, but 4 is just a nightmare
    I've improved which is a good sign; my marks are averaging in the 70s but it all depends on what Oxford have cooked up for us for Wednesday! In some papers, I got in the mid 60s and I don't want that happening. My aim is 15 in Q6, 36 in Q1, at least 10 in Q2 and Q3 and that should be 71....


    _______
    Also, guys, can anyone help me on Q2)iv) on the 2008 paper? I don't quite understand the mark scheme.
    The bit I don't understand is why you use the (sorry, cba to type subscripts...) (xn)^2-2(yn)^2=1? Why do we assume that? I thought it was just an equation?
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    The way I think about it is consider the equation x^2-2y^2-1=0

    You want to get that in a form of x/y= (something)

    as n gets high, the 1 becomes negligible So x/y tends to root 2.
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    (Original post by bluebell_flames)
    Has anyone else started to really panic now? The MAT is so soon (~61 hours to go :eek:)
    YES!!! how are you coping?
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    (Original post by BankOfPigs)
    The way I think about it is consider the equation x^2-2y^2-1=0

    You want to get that in a form of x/y= (something)

    as n gets high, the 1 becomes negligible So x/y tends to root 2.
    Yeah, I considered that and got the answer but why do you consider it? I thought it only works for its solutions? Sorry to sound stupid.
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    In part (ii) you've found values for a and b such that (x_n+1)^2 - 2(y_n+1)^2 = (x_n)^2 - 2(y_n)^2, which means the value of x^2 - 2y^2 doesn't change as n increases. And since in (i) we've seen that (x_1)^2 - 2(y_1)^2 = 1 (i.e. the base case), we therefore can inductively say that (x_n)^2 - 2(y_n)^2 = 1 for all n.
    It's at that point you can then divide by (y_n)^2 and consider what happens in the limit.
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    (Original post by BeltonianNewt)
    YES!!! how are you coping?
    Aww and I guess I'm not really If I mess up, 40% of my uni applications will have basically been completely wasted!

    How about you?
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    (Original post by yl95)
    Yeah, I considered that and got the answer but why do you consider it? I thought it only works for its solutions? Sorry to sound stupid.
    Are you aware that there is theoretically infinite solutions? (In the question we find 3 pairs but there are a lot more)

    The relationship between the x and y values gets closer and closer towards root 2 in each 'iteration'.
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    (Original post by Woostarite)
    In part (ii) you've found values for a and b such that (x_n+1)^2 - 2(y_n+1)^2 = (x_n)^2 - 2(y_n)^2, which means the value of x^2 - 2y^2 doesn't change as n increases. And since in (i) we've seen that (x_1)^2 - 2(y_1)^2 = 1 (i.e. the base case), we therefore can inductively say that (x_n)^2 - 2(y_n)^2 = 1 for all n.
    It's at that point you can then divide by (y_n)^2 and consider what happens in the limit.

    (Original post by BankOfPigs)
    Are you aware that there is theoretically infinite solutions? (In the question we find 3 pairs but there are a lot more)

    The relationship between the x and y values gets closer and closer towards root 2 in each 'iteration'.
    Ah, thank you.. Both were very well explained.
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    (Original post by BankOfPigs)
    Are you aware that there is theoretically infinite solutions? (In the question we find 3 pairs but there are a lot more)

    The relationship between the x and y values gets closer and closer towards root 2 in each 'iteration'.
    Honestly, I should have noticed that there are theoretically infinite solutions. Always missing out the obvious. -_-
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    42nd page! For the love of Douglas Adams, I must make a post!
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    (Original post by bluebell_flames)
    Aww and I guess I'm not really If I mess up, 40% of my uni applications will have basically been completely wasted!

    How about you?
    That's pretty much the same with me. My application is good but this MAT - my result is currently unpredictable. I haven't yet done enough practice!!

    Godwilling i will do well! At least 50/100 i'm aiming for 70+ though ideally.
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    (Original post by BeltonianNewt)
    That's pretty much the same with me. My application is good but this MAT - my result is currently unpredictable. I haven't yet done enough practice!!

    Godwilling i will do well! At least 50/100 i'm aiming for 70+ though ideally.
    I feel 100% the same way Just thinking about Wednesday makes me nauseous.
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    Set sail for fail...

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 4
 
 
 
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