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    (Original post by AnnekaChan173)
    It has come up quite a bit, it relates to excretion and detoxification of alcohol as it uses NAD. You'll be fine though. If I were you I'd learn content before banging out those papers because there are so few of them
    I thought beta oxidation pathway was how fats are respired? Nothing to do with alcohol.
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    The text book is pretty long and I am slightly short of time to memorise it entirely, can anyone recommend any notes or revision guides that you think still have sufficient information for an A?
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    (Original post by lilmi5s_elmo)
    I thought beta oxidation pathway was how fats are respired? Nothing to do with alcohol.
    Fatty liver and cirrhosis? It's one of those ones which links modules, since NAD is needed to convert fatty acids to something that can bind to CoA (and can be shuttled into the Krebs Cycle) and NAD is also used when detoxifying alcohol. Alcoholics get fatty liver because there is too little NAD available for B-oxidation to take place as it's being used to detoxify the alcohol, fatty acids aren't converted to a state that allows them to be respired, so fatty acids are converted to triglycerides, which form fatty deposits in hepatocytes. It's somewhere in the textbook.


    Ignore all the stuff that you don't need, but NAD is used here.

    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    has it really? Which paper has it shown up in?
    Not sure which paper but I've seen questions, mainly in those question packs. So they might be legacy ones but they're worth doing imo.
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    (Original post by AnnekaChan173)
    Fatty liver and cirrhosis? It's one of those ones which links modules, since NAD is needed to convert fatty acids to things that can bind to CoA (and can be shuttled into the Krebs Cycle) and NAD is also used when detoxifying alcohol. Alcoholics get fatty liver because there is too little NAD available for B-oxidation to take place as it's being used to detoxify the alcohol, fatty acids aren't converted to a state that allows them to be respired, so fatty acids are converted to triglycerides, which form fatty deposits in hepatocytes. It's somewhere in the textbook.


    Ignore all the stuff that you don't need, but NAD is used here.



    Not sure which paper but I've seen questions, mainly in those question packs. So they might be legacy ones but they're worth doing imo.
    Beta oxidation pathway isn't in our spec

    I had a quick glimpse of the spec and the words beta oxidation pathway never came up
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    (Original post by Nucleotide)
    Beta oxidation pathway isn't in our spec

    I had a quick glimpse of the spec and the words beta oxidation pathway never came up
    Hence why I said ignore all the stuff you don't need to know haha. They don't use the phrase beta-oxidation, but they say that NAD is used to "oxidise and break down fatty acids". It's mentioned on page 41 and page 97. I'm not saying it will come up, you don't need to know it in detail, but knowing that NAD is used might help. It's also the reason why fats produce a lot more ATP by chemiosmosis.
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    This may have been asked already but the DNA helicase breaks the hydrogen bonds between two DNA strands right? Why does it not state that in the CGP book and instead mentions RNA polymerase attaching from the start and not from when DNA template is formed?
    Also again, what reforms the hydrogen bonds after transcription? Surely it can't be DNA helicase again since that's done its job already.
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    (Original post by Glh96)
    Does anyone have idea of the differences between a synapse and a neuromuscular junction?

    Thanks in advance!
    Page 15: http://www.thebiotutor.com/uploads/2..._questions.pdf

    Your welcome
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    (Original post by Littlefinger)
    This may have been asked already but the DNA helicase breaks the hydrogen bonds between two DNA strands right? Why does it not state that in the CGP book and instead mentions RNA polymerase attaching from the start and not from when DNA template is formed?
    Also again, what reforms the hydrogen bonds after transcription? Surely it can't be DNA helicase again since that's done its job already.
    Helicase is usually an AVP marking point as it isn't really on the spec, so I'd say don't worry about it too much. What do you mean by the second question? The H-bonds are formed because of atoms in the nucleotide base leaving a slightly positive and negative charge (trying not to get too deep into chem), they happen anyway because complementary bases are attracted to each other (because of opposite changes in different place etc). The nucleotides in the sugar backbone however are linked together by RNA polymerase, which links from 3' to 5' I think.
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    IF ANYONE HAS THE PAPERS FOR F214&5 WITH MARKSCHEME pls send it to me or upload it here i cant find it anywhere!, thankyou in advance
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    (Original post by AnnekaChan173)
    It has come up quite a bit, it relates to excretion and detoxification of alcohol as it uses NAD. You'll be fine though. If I were you I'd learn content before banging out those papers because there are so few of them
    Oh cool, yeah i agree, content first!

    But what do you mean by "it relates to excretion and detoxification of alcohol as it uses NAD"? In the book it says beta-oxi.pahway is the pathway taken when f.acid-CoA complexes are broken down into 2C acetyl groups that are attached to CoA - which is in the end on the respiration module.
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Oh cool, yeah i agree, content first!

    But what do you mean by "it relates to excretion and detoxification of alcohol as it uses NAD"? In the book it says beta-oxi.pahway is the pathway taken when f.acid-CoA complexes are broken down into 2C acetyl groups that are attached to CoA - which is in the end on the respiration module.
    As in, often if you see B-oxidation in a question, it's related to the detoxification of alcohol sorry! I can't type in English haha Yeah, its part of respiration.
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Oh cool, yeah i agree, content first!

    But what do you mean by "it relates to excretion and detoxification of alcohol as it uses NAD"? In the book it says beta-oxi.pahway is the pathway taken when f.acid-CoA complexes are broken down into 2C acetyl groups that are attached to CoA - which is in the end on the respiration module.

    I think what she meant was that, NAD is used in the Beta-oxidation pathway and also in detoxification of alcohols/excretion. Alcoholics use a lot of NAD in order to detoxify the alcohols (NAD accepts Hs during this). This means that the Beta-oxidation pathway cannot occur or is limited as it requires NAD as well.
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    For the fight or flight response do we need to know about CRF and ACTH?
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    (Original post by Nucleotide)
    For the fight or flight response do we need to know about CRF and ACTH?
    Yes you do. You should no once the cerebral cortex perceives a threat it activates the hypothalamus to release CRF into the pituitary gland. This leads to the anterior pituitary gland releasing ACTH, which leads to the release of hormones from the adrenal cortex,
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    (Original post by bbadonde2)
    Yes you do. You should no once the cerebral cortex perceives a threat it activates the hypothalamus to release CRF into the pituitary gland. This leads to the anterior pituitary gland releasing ACTH, which leads to the release of hormones from the adrenal cortex,
    So many holes in my revision guide... What does CRF and ACTH stand for?
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    So many holes in my revision guide... What does CRF and ACTH stand for?
    Summary on page 20 Here:

    http://www.thebiotutor.com/uploads/2..._questions.pdf
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Summary on page 20 Here:

    http://www.thebiotutor.com/uploads/2..._questions.pdf
    we need to know about CRF and ACTH ;/?
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    (Original post by games211)
    we need to know about CRF and ACTH ;/?
    Hey, its that little section at the bottom on page 238 (3 paragraphs long) and also check out figure 1 (a) on the top of next page.
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    So many holes in my revision guide... What does CRF and ACTH stand for?
    Corticotropin releasing factor and adrenocorticotropic hormone
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    hi does anyone know if crashmaths have made a mock paper for f214/f215 like they did for f212 and f211. Many thanx
 
 
 
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