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    (Original post by brown_unicorn)
    What did Corbyn do to change labour apart from moving them move to the left?
    Well that is literally the only major thing he did, he moved all policy ideas to the left- e.g. defence, he stated he would never push the nuclear button, no Syrian intervention, and more examples in each policy area. It's common after an election for the opposition to swing further to their side on the political spectrum, which is essentially what Corbyn did.

    In other ways, he has certainly increased the number of Labour party members in the general public, but has also caused some divisions within the Labour party, especially with Blairites who despise Corbyn's radical socialist ideologies.
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    Would anyone like to mark and give me some critical feedback on this past paper I just done? Unit 1 Elections & Pressure Groups
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  1. File Type: pdf Edexcel Politics Unit 1 Jan 09 Past Paper.pdf (891.1 KB, 66 views)
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    (Original post by brown_unicorn)
    What did Corbyn do to change labour apart from moving them move to the left?
    No idea if this is relevant as I don't do political parties but he changed the opposition's style of PMQs by asking the PM questions directly from the public - I suppose that could be related to his sort of grassroots style of politics? His style also attracted like 200,000 new members to Labour or something along those lines.
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    Let me not lie - please try your best in AS politics exams because A2 politics is HELL. I do US gov and pol at my school and the content is 6x the amount you have to learn for AS - and you HAVE to revise all topics, not like AS where you can pick two. All I'm saying is try your hardest to get the best grade possible and don't have the mindset of 'its fine I can retake' - do not increase your workload!!!!

    Trust me AS is 50% of the final grade and a million times easier than A2 - give yourself something to fall back on!!!
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    (Original post by stabilobossgreen)
    Let me not lie - please try your best in AS politics exams because A2 politics is HELL. I do US gov and pol at my school and the content is 6x the amount you have to learn for AS - and you HAVE to revise all topics, not like AS where you can pick two. All I'm saying is try your hardest to get the best grade possible and don't have the mindset of 'its fine I can retake' - do not increase your workload!!!!

    Trust me AS is 50% of the final grade and a million times easier than A2 - give yourself something to fall back on!!!
    Good Advice. I'll take it thank you
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    Corbyn's economic policy focus more on big government which is a left wing policy. EG: Nationalising rail and steel.

    Corbyn is against military intervention eg: Syria and wants to sell off Trident nuclear weapons

    Corbyn is against austerity measures and cut in tax credits/benefits
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    Hi guys, to what extent does corbyn stand by the new labour principles?
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    (Original post by Lewismioc)
    For the 25 markers, what is everyones timing?
    25 minutes funnily enough 😅it's a mark a minute literally


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    If you end up talking about internal divisions in major parties or just within Labour, you might get bonus points for mentioning it's Momentum (on the left) vs Progress (on the right/Blairite side) that are the two main warring factions.
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    Would someone mind telling me the distinction between tyranny of the majority and tyranny of the minority please?
    And what systems would refer to them or if they just refer to pressure groups and my electoral system


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    I'm currently making a document for facts and statistics that could be useful in the exam, does anyone have any stats about elections other than how unrepresentative FPTP can be?
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    (Original post by MBenjamin)
    I'm currently making a document for facts and statistics that could be useful in the exam, does anyone have any stats about elections other than how unrepresentative FPTP can be?
    I've got the social make up of parliament after the general election and the stats for the parties under pr?


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    If someone could mark this part of a past paper I did please?! It's from January 2009 on pressure groups.

    USING EXAMPLES, DISTINGUISH BETWEEN SECTIONAL AND PROMOTIONAL PRESSURE GROUPS (5)

    Sectional pressure groups represent a specific area of society and its interests. An example of a sectional group is Age UK, who campaign for the elderly.

    On the other hand, promotional pressure groups promote/fight for a specific cause which may not directly benefit its members. An example is the environmental group 'Greenpeace'.

    EXPLAIN THE METHODS USED BY PRESSURE GROUPS TO INFLUENCE GOVERNMENT (10)

    One method used by pressure groups to influence government is lobbying. This occurred in 2011-12 when the Welfare Reform Act was being drafted and ministers and civil servants were subjected to much lobbying. It is where groups ambush them in order to influence the development of legislation.

    Another method used by pressure groups to influence government is a direct form - protesting. In 2003, thousands marched against military intervention in Iraq. Also, in 2011, students took to the streets protesting against rises in university tuition fees. Protesting can attract substantial media coverage and can therefore force the government's hand.

    A third way that pressure groups can try and influence government is through petitions. For example, websites like 38 Degrees allow a platform for this to take place. If a petition gains enough signatures it can be held in a parliamentary debate.

    TO WHAT EXTENT DO PRESSURE GROUPS PROMOTE PLURALIST DEMOCRACY? (25)

    Pluralist democracy is where a wide variety of groups and views are represented and these views are taken into account in Parliament when making decisions.

    Pressure groups can be said to promote pluralist democracy because they defend the views of the minority. Groups such as the Multiple Sclerosis Society fight on behalf of those who have such diseases, which would otherwise go unrepresented. However, it can be counter-argued that minority voices who lack funding can be drowned out by those who can afford better resources and can use wealth to sway decisions in their favour. Examples are the British Confederation Industry or the British Banking Association, who have much more money and resources to influence the current Conservative government than small groups such as Fathers For Justice.

    Pressure groups can also be said to promote pluralist democracy because of recent partisan dealignment. This is where people no longer tend to strongly affiliate with a particular party. Pressure groups therefore represent the views of the those who have specific demands, compared to political parties that cater to broad interests. For example, trade unions argue for workers' rights and on issues such as pay and employment conditions. Political parties such as the Conservatives are less likely to focus on this cause as it would mean more spending. Additionally, animal rights' groups such as Animal Welfare support the protection of animals in a society where most people eat meat.
    However, certain groups may have more influence if they are of greater size, which may drown out the voice of those who have a strong case but little following. An example of this is Animal Welfare against Countryside Alliance (100,000+ members).

    Thirdly, pressure groups may promote pluralist democracy in the sense that they use a variety of platforms in order to receive peoples' views and mobilise support. An example is through 38 Degrees which provides an online platform for pressure groups to create petitions, discuss views and organise further action. This supports pluralism because it helps to open up opportunities for membership and forms of action which can influence the government.
    However, the greater move towards technological tactics may end up alienating those without Internet access, such as the elderly.

    In conclusion, pressure groups can be argued to support pluralist democracy. This is because they provide support for the minority, represent those who have specific interests due to lack of party affiliation and have made greater use of technology. However, elitist a counter this view, arguing that power is concentrated in the hands of a few and only a select number of pressure groups with great size and wealth have a real influence on the activities and decisions in government.
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    I've got the social make up of parliament after the general election and the stats for the parties under pr?


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    send my way please!
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    I thought I would start an official thread since the exam is approaching....

    How is revision going guys...and how many topics are you learning?
    I'm reading this threat instead of revising *facepalm*
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    (Original post by MBenjamin)
    send my way please!
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    I've got the social make up of parliament after the general election and the stats for the parties under pr?

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    Tyranny of majority is where majority dominates e.g. referendum and minority is not accounted for.

    Tyranny of minority or minoritarianism is where the minority have a certain degree of power and may even have more power that their minority suggests through pressure groups
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    HERE ARE ALL THE 25 MARKERS IVE SEEN PREDICTED

    DEMOCRACY
    - Are referendums good for democracy ?
    - Direct Democracy and Referendums
    - Participation

    PRESSURE GROUPS
    - Participation
    - Factors of Success/Failure
    - Impact of Social media

    ELECTIONS
    - IMPACT OF PR
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    (Original post by AllanSmith22)
    Tyranny of majority is where majority dominates e.g. referendum and minority is not accounted for.

    Tyranny of minority or minoritarianism is where the minority have a certain degree of power and may even have more power that their minority suggests through pressure groups
    Ahh I see thank you so much, so I don't practically need to use the tyranny of the minority for elections


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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Ahh I see thank you so much, so I don't practically need to use the tyranny of the minority for elections


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    no. actually its not an established term like Tyranny of majority so you could just say exceeding power. Tyranny Majority can be used in every topic
 
 
 
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