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    (Original post by Namita Gurung)
    For b of this question, what does the question mean? What is it asking us to do?
    I've looked at the markscheme and exam solutions but I still don't understand.
    Easier than what you might think by looking at it.
    Simply find the y values that when you put it in their formula give you an answer bigger than or equal to 8.
    In this case any value of y that is 2 or more will give you an answer bigger than or equal to 8.
    Then work out the probability that y is 2 or bigger (you already have that answer to hand)
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    (Original post by Namita Gurung)
    For b of this question, what does the question mean? What is it asking us to do?
    I've looked at the markscheme and exam solutions but I still don't understand.
    you find a, b, c and d by comparing the probability to the cumulative probability and by understanding that the probabilities add up to one.

    For probability of 3Y+2>8 = Y>2

    find the probability of y being equal or more than to
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    (Original post by Namita Gurung)
    For b of this question, what does the question mean? What is it asking us to do?
    I've looked at the markscheme and exam solutions but I still don't understand.
    Make y the subject p(3y>/6)
    p(Y>/2)
    Look on the graph

    This is the same as 1-F(1)
    = .9
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    (Original post by candol)
    Easier than what you might think by looking at it.
    Simply find the y values that when you put it in their formula give you an answer bigger than or equal to 8.
    In this case any value of y that is 2 or more will give you an answer bigger than or equal to 8.
    Then work out the probability that y is 2 or bigger (you already have that answer to hand)
    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    you find a, b, c and d by comparing the probability to the cumulative probability and by understanding that the probabilities add up to one.For probability of 3Y+2>8 = Y>2find the probability of y being equal or more than to
    (Original post by NoahMal)
    Make y the subject p(3y>/6)p(Y>/2)Look on the graphThis is the same as 1-F(1)= .9


    Ooh ok thank you! Don't know why that got me stuck for ages
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    (Original post by noahmal)
    quick last minute stress question..
    Say e(x) = 3 and var(x)=2

    find e(2x^2+3x)


    would this be
    var(x) = e(x^2)-e(x)^2
    therefore e(x^2) is 11
    making e(2(11)+3(3))
    resulting in the final answer being
    31
    bump this pls iMacJack
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    Good luck everybody. Quick question that's been bugging me, you know the questions that ask you what appropriate data and measure of spread you should use, what should you write?
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    (Original post by AlphaWolfZ)
    Good luck everybody. Quick question that's been bugging me, you know the questions that ask you what appropriate data and measure of spread you should use, what should you write?
    When there is skewed data or outliers then you must use the median as it is not affected by outliers/ rogue values. When the data is symmetrical you can say either may be used as mean ≈ Median ≈ Mode
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    (Original post by AlphaWolfZ)
    Good luck everybody. Quick question that's been bugging me, you know the questions that ask you what appropriate data and measure of spread you should use, what should you write?
    If the data is skewed, use median and IQR as they're not affected by skewness. If it's symmetrical, then use mean and standard deviation
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    (Original post by NoahMal;65794011

    ([url="http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?p=65793951#post65 793951"
    )

    Original post[/url] by noahmal)
    quick last minute stress question..
    Say e(x) = 3 and var(x)=2

    find e(2x^2+3x)


    would this be
    var(x) = e(x^2)-e(x)^2
    therefore e(x^2) is 11
    making e(2(11)+3(3))
    resulting in the final answer being

    31]bump this pls iMacJack
    Super bump

    Zacken TeeEm kingaaran SeanFM NotNotBatman TSR student41 JDonovan Arsey IrrationalRoot Irrational Pi Number Nine physicsmaths spotify48
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    I think it will be
    2E(X^2)+3E(x)
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    This exam is gonna be my nightmare before Christmas


    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Damn my revision guide has nothing on modelling. What do I have to know?
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    anybody felt like da paper was easier dan expected 😁😁😁😁 praise da Lord fr he had mercy on our dumb asses😇😇😇
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    Good luck all!
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    btw anyone gt 5/18 fr da answer i da prob question last part dat was like da only doubtfull question i had
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    Final last minute question: how does rounding work in the mean? Do you round up?
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    Hey guys how was the paper?
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    (Original post by hasi.99)
    Hey guys how was the paper?
    No ones donee the paper yet...
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    I can't believe how easy that was😅
    But, it was only easy if you knew the concepts!! Last question was very tricky but I think I pulled it off!!


    For those who haven't entered the exam hall yet make sure to revise normal distribution before you go in!!

    And probability lol

    And discrete random variables!!

    This exams was all about
    Chapters 5, 8, 9, 7 with knowledge you should've known from chaps 1-3!!

    How was it for you guys ?!!
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    Guys is this the IAL S1 thread or the GCE thread
 
 
 
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