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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Like the surgical ones that come in packets?
    Sounds like those yeah.
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Sounds like those yeah.
    Why? That sounds horrendously expensive...
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    My ear is messed up from the flight . I had a cold so my eustachian tube must have been blocked and now I can't get my right ear to "pop". I can't hear **** all through it and I've tried all the standard yawning/swallowing/valsalva thing. I have a 9am tomorrow only have ~1 hour break. Is it worth me going to the walk in clinic about it? I'm not registered with the GP down here.
    This is probably useless advice as it is just from my experience, not anything medical, but I get that a lot after I fly, and it usually goes after a day or two. You might have an uncomfortable night waking up when your ears pop a bit, maybe even two uncomfortable days/nights, but it has always gone away eventually for me. I do sympathise though, it really sucks doesn't it!

    I am having a bad day today. Boring intercalation applications to finish, essays due Monday and Friday, progress test on Wednesday that I haven't revised for because last week we had a poster and a presentation. And competency on Tuesday and another presentation on Thursday. Also haven't filled in my logbook for weeks. I am hoping I can start on the logbook and that will sort of work as revision too, not going to think about the rest of it! Argh I hate 4th year!!
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Sounds like those yeah.
    No need mate. Can just use the cheapo ones from the boxes, just make sure to clean the site well with one of the wipes or the sponge things.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Why? That sounds horrendously expensive...
    Not sure if they're sterilised or not but they do come in their own packet

    (Original post by digitalis)
    No need mate. Can just use the cheapo ones from the boxes, just make sure to clean the site well with one of the wipes or the sponge things.
    Leave me alone, I was just doing what I was told
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Not sure if they're sterilised or not but they do come in their own packet

    Leave me alone, I was just doing what I was told
    Keep doing it for your OSCEs, and if any hospital you work in insists on it (I am only aware of one that does). It seems like a massive waste of money on sterile packs though, especially if you fail a couple of times...

    I do always use gloves for cannulation and venepuncture (though plenty of my seniors don't) but if you use proper technique there's no need for sterile ones. The gloves are more to protect you from the patient than anything else.
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Not sure if they're sterilised or not but they do come in their own packet
    Leave me alone, I was just doing what I was told

    I never use sterile gloves - i do when doing catheterisation. Well the whole once ive done it on a real person.
    If thats what you have been told then keep on doing it. I started to get sloppy and not use gloves - its so much easier.

    Im not looking forward to tomorrow.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I do always use gloves for cannulation and venepuncture (though plenty of my seniors don't) but if you use proper technique there's no need for sterile ones. The gloves are more to protect you from the patient than anything else.
    Though copying your seniors isn't always the best thing. Plenty of mine stick needles into vacutainers and all I can see in my head is 'needlestick injury' and makes me cringe.

    I got this for Xmas and thought I'd share
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    Though copying your seniors isn't always the best thing. Plenty of mine stick needles into vacutainers and all I can see in my head is 'needlestick injury' and makes me cringe.
    Oh yes, lots of people use techniques you really shouldn't follow, but sterile gloves for cannulation seems like overkill, plus it's even more pointless unless you also use a sterile pack and do everything aseptically.

    I do use needles for vacutainers though; if you're bleeding a difficult patient from a fragile vein the vacuum is too strong if you apply them directly and will just collapse the vein, so a syringe is the only way. If you're not an idiot, there are techniques to avoid getting needlesticks.
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    I never use vaccutainers! I hate them. I think its well dodge if you have someone with fragile veins, no flashback, feels like I'm going to dislodge the needle everytime you change a bottle.

    I think it's alright if your taking blood from a juicy AC vein but apart from that...needle and syringe all the way.
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    ok so i'm now feeling the regret of not doing much work or exercise over the christmas break. Spending around 10 hours rowing this weekend in total and not being able to move just shows how lazy I've been. Also now have 5 days to write an essay and still have a heap of work to catch up on. The essay is looking disastrous... I have plans for 4/5 evenings this week and lectures until 6 on monday and tuesday. Welcome back to the real world.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I never use vaccutainers! I hate them. I think its well dodge if you have someone with fragile veins, no flashback, feels like I'm going to dislodge the needle everytime you change a bottle.

    I think it's alright if your taking blood from a juicy AC vein but apart from that...needle and syringe all the way.
    I thought they were ideal on the end of a butterfly - no risk of dislodging the needle when changing bottle, etc, but then the phlebotomist told me off cos apparently butterfly's cost too much. I can't do needle and syringe though - I need three hands for that!
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I can't do needle and syringe though - I need three hands for that!
    Should learn! It's a good skill. Much finer control of the vacuum and you can 'test' the vein as well. Also, way I see it, it's the universal way of taking blood across the world. Vaccutainer is a brand, that stuff might just be the flavour of the month right now.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Should learn! It's a good skill. Much finer control of the vacuum and you can 'test' the vein as well. Also, way I see it, it's the universal way of taking blood across the world. Vaccutainer is a brand, that stuff might just be the flavour of the month right now.
    I just don't have the single-hand strength to pull the plunger back without pulling the whole shebang back out of the vein :dontknow: Gotta get me some finger-size weights, I think!
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I thought they were ideal on the end of a butterfly - no risk of dislodging the needle when changing bottle, etc, but then the phlebotomist told me off cos apparently butterfly's cost too much. I can't do needle and syringe though - I need three hands for that!
    I always use butterflies :yep: (though butterfly and syringe rather than the vacutainer butterfly things that I've never actually seen one of!)

    This is coming from paeds where all we ever used were butterflies though and I never want to stop using them, just find them so easy (lucky if I can find any on the ward though :rolleyes:)
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    I really liked the monovettes I learned with, much preferred them to vacutainers. Nowhere in London that I've worked seems to have them though.
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    Talk about a lucky escape...

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    First med school exam tommorow! :woo:
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    (Original post by gozatron)
    First med school exam tommorow! :woo:
    At least yours are formative, mine is the real deal! Arghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Mon, Tues and Weds exams
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    (Original post by rumandraisin)
    At least yours are formative, mine is the real deal! Arghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Mon, Tues and Weds exams
    Mine aren't formative. The real shizzle.
 
 
 
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