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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    (Original post by nevarsan)
    What are the differences between the two type of classification system? (4)
    They'll normally ask you features of the domain so
    -domain is made up of 3 groups: archae, archaebacteria and eukaryotes
    -domain is based on RNA, DNA
    -domain reflects the similarities between eukaryote kingdoms
    -domain reflects on origins on eukaryotes and prokaryotes
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    (Original post by wndms)
    "Explain the relationship between classification and taxonomy"

    "Explain the relationship between classification and phylogeny"

    Can someone explain this please? I just don't get the actual difference.. although I know their definitions are different.

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    Classification: sorting living things into groups. Has a couple of uses: makes it easier to identify a living organism, makes it easier to study organisms, shows evolutionary relationship between organisms
    taxonomy: study of the principles of classification e.g. the difference between species
    Phylogeny: study of evolutionary history using an evolutionary tree
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    (Original post by HeyMickey6)
    Well it hasn't come up so I think is worth knowing about it.
    Probably, but it's not in the textbook so I wouldn't stress about it
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    (Original post by cookiess)
    Probably, but it's not in the textbook so I wouldn't stress about it
    Yes it is, page 164-165 'Discuss the global impact'
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    With regards to antibodies and their actions, my notes and different textbooks have different explanations of Neutralisation; some say that it's the antibodies binding to the toxins released by the pathogens to neutralise their effect, but other books say it's the binding of the antibodies to the antigens in order to prevent them binding to cells in the body and therefore neutralising them. Which is correct?


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    (Original post by chloemily)
    With regards to antibodies and their actions, my notes and different textbooks have different explanations of Neutralisation; some say that it's the antibodies binding to the toxins released by the pathogens to neutralise their effect, but other books say it's the binding of the antibodies to the antigens in order to prevent them binding to cells in the body and therefore neutralising them. Which is correct?


    Antibodies bind to the antigen on the pathogen which stops the pathogen from binding to other cells receptors and infecting them
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    if there is a question on simpsons index of diversity, will they give us the formula?
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    One last big favour... Dont suppose anyone has a list of what came up in january (saw a similsr thing on thr f211 page and it was really usefull)
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    (Original post by Grammar Kid)
    One last big favour... Dont suppose anyone has a list of what came up in january (saw a similsr thing on thr f211 page and it was really usefull)
    From what I can remember, first question was classification with a dichotomous key and adaption stuff, then there was a lot on immunity and vaccinations etc., an 6/8 marker on the roles of RNA in plasma cells/antibodies, another big question on the advantages and disadvantages of using microorganisms for food (mycoprotein), a couple pages on carbohydrates and lipids, and to finish there was a definition table for evolution and biodiversity

    And thanks for answering my question Prees
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    (Original post by Prees)
    Yes it is, page 164-165 'Discuss the global impact'
    oh right, my bad :/. Yeah- but the only section you actually have to know on the double spread is ''why are diseases important'' which you can kind of work out via common sense and then you have the WHO and how they control it. The other sections will be given to you cause they have facts and figures. Biology isn't about memorising figures, it's about analysing statistics and seeing the correlation between the two bivariate variables
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    hey guys any idea how many raw marks do we need to get full UMS? what was the trend in the previous papers?
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    (Original post by FootyMad123)
    if there is a question on simpsons index of diversity, will they give us the formula?
    I think they will- they have on previous past papers...making us learn it would be mean xD
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    (Original post by chloemily)
    From what I can remember, first question was classification with a dichotomous key and adaption stuff, then there was a lot on immunity and vaccinations etc., an 6/8 marker on the roles of RNA in plasma cells/antibodies, another big question on the advantages and disadvantages of using microorganisms for food (mycoprotein), a couple pages on carbohydrates and lipids, and to finish there was a definition table for evolution and biodiversity

    And thanks for answering my question Prees
    That sounded like an horrific paper haha
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    I will put forward my guestimates of what I think may come up, but take it with a pinch of salt

    - DNA replication
    - Immune response
    - Smoking/smoking diseases
    - Water
    - Compare & contrast a globular/fibrous protein
    - Conservation in situ/ex situ
    - Domain/Kingdom classification system contrast/compare

    But as it's OCR they may just make half the paper on enzymes like last summer...
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    What do monophyletic and polygenetic groups mean?
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    (Original post by jollygood)
    hey guys any idea how many raw marks do we need to get full UMS? what was the trend in the previous papers?
    I'd like to know this too! If anyone could guestimate what it'll be this year (very roughly), that'd be great
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    I will put forward my guestimates of what I think may come up, but take it with a pinch of salt

    - DNA replication
    - Immune response
    - Smoking/smoking diseases
    - Water
    - Compare & contrast a globular/fibrous protein
    - Conservation in situ/ex situ
    - Domain/Kingdom classification system contrast/compare

    But as it's OCR they may just make half the paper on enzymes like last summer...
    I love these topics!! /sobs
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    (Original post by xKaylax)
    What do monophyletic and polygenetic groups mean?
    Monophyletic group = Includes ancestral organism + all its descendants

    Paraphyletic group = Includes the most recent ancestar + only some of its descendants

    Got a feeling you only need to know that at A2 though, not AS.. correct me if I am wrong though
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Monophyletic group = Includes ancestral organism + all its descendants

    Paraphyletic group = Includes the most recent ancestar + only some of its descendants

    Got a feeling you only need to know that at A2 though, not AS.. correct me if I am wrong though
    Yah, thats Unit 5 'Species Concept' stuff really.
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    (Original post by almazzee)
    I'd like to know this too! If anyone could guestimate what it'll be this year (very roughly), that'd be great
    Depends entirely on grade boundaries which can fluctuate quite a lot each year. But generally if you get 85+ raw marks that will guarantee you full ums, it can be as low as 78-80 though, again depending on how high/low the grade boundaries are!
 
 
 
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