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    (Original post by Mini_123)
    Please can someone explain oxidative phosphorylation to me? Thank you in advance
    Oxidative phosphorylation is the formation of ATP by the addition of an inorganic phosphate (Pi) to ADP in the presence of oxygen.

    The proton motive force (flow of protons through channels associated with the ATP synthase enzyme) drives the rotational part of the enzyme and joins the ADP and Pi to form ATP.

    This occurs in the final stage of respiration and involves the electron transport chain.
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    (Original post by Mini_123)
    Please can someone explain oxidative phosphorylation to me? Thank you in advance
    (Original post by Cara_rose)
    Oxidative phosphorylation is the formation of ATP by the addition of an inorganic phosphate (Pi) to ADP in the presence of oxygen.

    The proton motive force (flow of protons through channels associated with the ATP synthase enzyme) drives the rotational part of the enzyme and joins the ADP and Pi to form ATP.

    This occurs in the final stage of respiration and involves the electron transport chain.
    Correction:

    NAD and FAD donates its hydrogen atoms, which split into electrons and H+ protons. The electrons move down electron carriers, losing energy at each carrier causing H+ protons to be actively pumped out into the matrix(?)

    Causes an electrochemical gradient inside and outside the inner mitochondrial membrane. As a result, H+ ions diffuse into the inner mitochondrial membrane via ATP Synthase enzyme (chemiosmosis), which causes ADP and Pi to bond, creating roughly 34 molecules of ATP per molecule of glucose.

    Once in the inner mitochondrial matrix, H+ protons and electrons bind together with oxygen to create water. Oxygen is the last hydrogen acceptor.
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    Correction:

    NAD and FAD donates its hydrogen atoms, which split into electrons and H+ protons. The electrons move down electron carriers, losing energy at each carrier causing H+ protons to be actively pumped out into the matrix(?)

    Causes an electrochemical gradient inside and outside the inner mitochondrial membrane. As a result, H+ ions diffuse into the inner mitochondrial membrane via ATP Synthase enzyme (chemiosmosis), which causes ADP and Pi to bond, creating roughly 34 molecules of ATP per molecule of glucose.

    Once in the inner mitochondrial matrix, H+ protons and electrons bind together with oxygen to create water. Oxygen is the last hydrogen acceptor.
    I was only briefly outlining specifically the process of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Also it's an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, and the H+ protons, using the energy lost by electrons as they pass down from electron carrier to electron carrier, are pumped across the membrane into the intermembrane space from the matrix. Oxidative phosphorylation occurs as a result of chemiosmosis.
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    (Original post by Cara_rose)
    I was only briefly outlining specifically the process of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Also it's an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, and the H+ protons, using the energy lost by electrons as they pass down from electron carrier to electron carrier, are pumped across the membrane into the intermembrane space from the matrix. Oxidative phosphorylation occurs as a result of chemiosmosis.
    ahh right, wording is always a pain
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    ahh right, wording is always a pain
    Indeed, and the mark scheme is so specific aha :')
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    No, because you are trying clone the parent, using its nucleus. If fertilisation took place the daughter cells won't be identical to the parent. Think of dolly the sheep!
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    From the F214 spec:

    outline how light energy is converted to chemical energy (ATP and reduced NADP) in the light-dependent stage (reference should be made to cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation, but no biochemical detail is required);

    Is the photophosphorylation stuff in the textbook just filler?!
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    Correction:

    NAD and FAD donates its hydrogen atoms, which split into electrons and H+ protons. The electrons move down electron carriers, losing energy at each carrier causing H+ protons to be actively pumped out into the matrix(?)

    Causes an electrochemical gradient inside and outside the inner mitochondrial membrane. As a result, H+ ions diffuse into the inner mitochondrial membrane via ATP Synthase enzyme (chemiosmosis), which causes ADP and Pi to bond, creating roughly 34 molecules of ATP per molecule of glucose.

    Once in the inner mitochondrial matrix, H+ protons and electrons bind together with oxygen to create water. Oxygen is the last hydrogen acceptor.
    Isn't oxygen the final electron acceptor ??
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    (Original post by TheLegalDealer)
    Isn't oxygen the final electron acceptor ??
    yes, but it's also the last hydrogen acceptor? in the same way you'll say that NAD will accept hydrogens in glycolysis and ethanal is the hydrogen accepter in anaerobic respiration in yeast
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    How can an egg get fertilised without a sperm?
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    (Original post by omshe24)
    How can an egg get fertilised without a sperm?
    You have an egg cell without a nucleus - an enucleated egg cell.
    You take a body cell from the organism you want to clone.
    Insert body cell nucleus into enucleated egg cell.
    Hence no sperm used. If sperm was used to fertilise the egg, you would have IVF not cloning.


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    (Original post by Hilton184)
    You have an egg cell without a nucleus - an enucleated egg cell.
    You take a body cell from the organism you want to clone.
    Insert body cell nucleus into enucleated egg cell.
    Hence no sperm used. If sperm was used to fertilise the egg, you would have IVF not cloning.


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    Yeh but how does it all work without a sperm cell

    Does the somatic cell have sperm or somethin :hmmm:

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    Roughly how many raw marks can you drop but still get 100% UMS for F215?

    BTW guys how are you preparing for the long answer questions? the mark schemes are so strict!
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    Any predictions for what will come up this year??
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    (Original post by mooo)
    Roughly how many raw marks can you drop but still get 100% UMS for F215?

    BTW guys how are you preparing for the long answer questions? the mark schemes are so strict!
    last year was 75 marks i think for full ums
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    (Original post by mooo)
    Roughly how many raw marks can you drop but still get 100% UMS for F215?

    BTW guys how are you preparing for the long answer questions? the mark schemes are so strict!
    They publish grade boundaries on their website showing the 90% threshold.

    Usually an A* is the difference between the A and B grade added on to the A. Full UMS is the difference doubled.
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    Does anyone else find F214 way harder than F215?
    Seriously the points on the spec for respiration go from (a) to (w). So depressing
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    (Original post by vincentjack)
    Does anyone else find F214 way harder than F215?
    Seriously the points on the spec for respiration go from (a) to (w). So depressing
    But that's just one topic there are atleast three topics like that go from a-w for f215 and much more to learn as well!


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    (Original post by cheeky 12)
    But that's just one topic there are atleast three topics like that go from a-w for f215 and much more to learn as well!
    Idk I think F215 is simpler, there's just a lot of it
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    (Original post by vincentjack)
    Idk I think F215 is simpler, there's just a lot of it
    after you have gone through the content are you able to answer past papers questions easily?
 
 
 
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