Edexcel Government & Politics - Unit 2 Governing the UK (09/06/16)

Announcements
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    where would you use this information for unit 2?
    thanks,
    You can state this in the Parliament section. Our teacher gave us this example and told us we should say:

    An example of Parliament fulfilling its function of Redress of Grievances through Select Committee investigation is Sport Direct's founder Mike Ashley had admitted that the workers at its Derbyshire warehouse were paid below the minimum wage and its policy of fining staff for being late was unacceptable. You can say something alongside the line of that . This shows the effectiveness of Select Committee as they can hold people to accountable for their actions which could help them represent the public further(as they resolve corruption).

    I think I rambled a bit too much but this example shows parliament is fulfilling their redress of grievances function.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Defraction)
    You can state this in the Parliament section. Our teacher gave us this example and told us we should say:

    An example of Parliament fulfilling its function of Redress of Grievances through Select Committee investigation is Sport Direct's founder Mike Ashley had admitted that the workers at its Derbyshire warehouse were paid below the minimum wage and its policy of fining staff for being late was unacceptable. You can say something alongside the line of that . This shows the effectiveness of Select Committee as they can hold people to accountable for their actions which could help them represent the public further(as they resolve corruption).

    I think I rambled a bit too much but this example shows parliament is fulfilling their redress of grievances function.
    Thank you so much! Also, I had a thought that perhaps you could use it in essays to show the Opposition illustrates the government as weak by criticising them in todays PMQs for not supporting workers rights in this case? Weak point? Let me know ur thoughts.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    Thank you so much! Also, I had a thought that perhaps you could use it in essays to show the Opposition illustrates the government as weak by criticising them in todays PMQs for not supporting workers rights in this case? Weak point? Let me know ur thoughts.
    If your point is strong enough then it's great! Wait, what happened in todays PMQS???
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by afrosenju)
    how many of the unit 1 questions did you predict successfully?
    2 out of the three I predicted
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Iain Wright MP for Hartlepool who is Chair of the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
    (Original post by xxvine)
    You know the sports direct case
    Which mp basically fought it and which comittee?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Defraction)
    If your point is strong enough then it's great! Wait, what happened in todays PMQS???
    thanks; it was basically just a question from Corbyn to Cameron, asking why the govt. doesn't protect worker's rights effectively:

    https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn/sta...21149226881024

    note; there's also an element of lack of collective responsibility here, due to employment minister giving statements implying the govt. should leave, when really, DC wants to remain.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student 1305)
    This is really brief but you could say:
    1) LEGISLATION
    discuss the role of HofL and Public/Private Member Bills
    party discipline - party whips ensure proposals are rarely defeated which defeeats the purpose of effective scrutiny
    electoral system is not truly representative of society because of FPTP system



    2) SCRUTINY AND ACCOUNTABILITY
    Question time is parliamentary theatre rather than effective scrutiny
    Select Committees are much more effective in scrutinising government departments such as recent work of Ian Wright against Sports Direct's Manager Mike Ashley

    3)REPRESENTATION
    mps are elected from single member constituencies and therefore there is a strong link between constituents and MPS
    discuss descriptive representation
    very few female Mps ( look at the guardian's article on representation)
    BME (black and minority ethnicities) only make up 4% of commons compared to the 14% BME population of UK
    90%MPs went to uni but only 20% of population are uni graduates

    what a legend. Thankyou so much !!!! 😊
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Does the lisbon treaty count as Constitutional Reform? It happened in 2007 and without it the EU would be less powerful over the UK so technically it should be..
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    My teacher just sent us his new predictions for tomorrow, they're similar to the ones we've already spoken about which is good Attachment 546019


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Molls hun, check my essay :* And also, 2 questions but i'll ask it here so other people can copy and appreciate your intellect! 1. How do we have a cabinet government? Well increased use since coalition... Needed to settle disputes. Also for cobra, serious conflicts. Also cab gove because they are important for policies as Michael gove helped for education policies and so did other cab ministers... (What else could you write)However its not a cab gov, undermined as cameron uses special advisers and other committee's, also not cab as patronage can control them? (What else for this)? Ik this question is similar to 'Assess the importance of cabinet' but it says 'now' so context changes fml...

    2. The factors that affect the relationship between parliament and government? I've mentioned party disunity (e.g labour right now is weak, lords are strong and can scrutinize). Someone mentioned coalition and party majority but i don't get that? What else could I say? Thank youuuu
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    thanks; it was basically just a question from Corbyn to Cameron, asking why the govt. doesn't protect worker's rights effectively:

    https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn/sta...21149226881024

    note; there's also an element of lack of collective responsibility here, due to employment minister giving statements implying the govt. should leave, when really, DC wants to remain.
    Corbyn would make such a great PM. Thank you for the video

    What topics are you currently revising on? Have you finished with everything?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    thanks; it was basically just a question from Corbyn to Cameron, asking why the govt. doesn't protect worker's rights effectively:

    https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn/sta...21149226881024

    note; there's also an element of lack of collective responsibility here, due to employment minister giving statements implying the govt. should leave, when really, DC wants to remain.
    I believe that's Priti Patel and yes a good example however the EU Referendum has been a circumstance where David Cameron has given his cabinet a 'free vote' although most of his cabinet have collectively declared that they are supporting the Remain side. However the leave supporting ministers do undermine the government's position when they are campaigning even though in reality these are colleagues who sit around their cabinet table and chat with them on a regular basis..
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Defraction)
    Corbyn would make such a great PM. Thank you for the video

    What topics are you currently revising on? Have you finished with everything?
    I'm currently revising the constitution- i honestly hope constitutional reform since 1997 comes up, with executive module, i'm a bit worried, because the wording of the questions always get me lol- parliament is alright, but i haaaate hol unelected/elected D:

    wbu, have you finished?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tej98)
    I believe that's Priti Patel and yes a good example however the EU Referendum has been a circumstance where David Cameron has given his cabinet a 'free vote' although most of his cabinet have collectively declared that they are supporting the Remain side. However the leave supporting ministers do undermine the government's position when they are campaigning even though in reality these are colleagues who sit around their cabinet table and chat with them on a regular basis..
    Edit; My mistake, i was not aware that Priti Patel is backing the Leave campaign, thank you!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    I'm currently revising the constitution- i honestly hope constitutional reform since 1997 comes up, with executive module, i'm a bit worried, because the wording of the questions always get me lol- parliament is alright, but i haaaate hol unelected/elected D:

    wbu, have you finished?
    I'm revising Parliament atm but I left constitution and PM&Cabinet for later as I'm better with those topics.

    HoL unelected/elected is literally the best part about Parliament. I hate the functions of Parliament, it's so boring and vague.

    I hope a question like 'how sovereign is the constitution' DOES NOT COME UP. It's really vague- I hope our Unit 2 is not weird like the Unit 1.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IRoranth)
    I'm currently revising the constitution- i honestly hope constitutional reform since 1997 comes up, with executive module, i'm a bit worried, because the wording of the questions always get me lol- parliament is alright, but i haaaate hol unelected/elected D:

    wbu, have you finished?
    You know for that Qu
    Do you only talk about 3 reforms? We won't have the time to address all of them will we?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Foji)
    Molls hun, check my essay :* And also, 2 questions but i'll ask it here so other people can copy and appreciate your intellect! 1. How do we have a cabinet government? Well increased use since coalition... Needed to settle disputes. Also for cobra, serious conflicts. Also cab gove because they are important for policies as Michael gove helped for education policies and so did other cab ministers... (What else could you write)However its not a cab gov, undermined as cameron uses special advisers and other committee's, also not cab as patronage can control them? (What else for this)? Ik this question is similar to 'Assess the importance of cabinet' but it says 'now' so context changes fml...

    2. The factors that affect the relationship between parliament and government? I've mentioned party disunity (e.g labour right now is weak, lords are strong and can scrutinize). Someone mentioned coalition and party majority but i don't get that? What else could I say? Thank youuuu
    You can talk about party discipline and whips whereby the whips control how MPs vote on key bills however since the 1970s MPs have started to become more independent in thinking. If MPs rebel against the government too many times they can have the whip withdrawn potentially meaning such individuals are expelled from their party. Good examples are the Euro-sceptic rebels in the 1992-97 government of John Major who defied the party line on numerous occasions and sat as independents until the whip was restored.

    Party majority size is a crucial one. If a party has a landslide majority (such as with Blair in 1997 and Thatcher in 1983) then it is easier for governments to pass legislation through without hassle, even in spite of a small rebellion. However if it is tiny (e.g Major in 1992 or Cameron post 2015) then there is little space for error and ultimately parliament can end up deciding the fate of a government on an important piece of proposed legislation or decision. Rebels tend to outnumber the majority here therefore it is easier to defeat a government regularly. Coalitions tend to be more secure with the mix of idelogical compromises allowing a weaker whipping system and providing more free votes to govt backbenchers.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Oh yeah mollyadtr I doubt the predicted parliament would come up , "parliament carries out none of its functions adequately" was 2014 , I'd imagine it will be about the divide between commons and lords or something
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by keirjohnharry)
    Oh yeah mollyadtr I doubt the predicted parliament would come up , "parliament carries out none of its functions adequately" was 2014 , I'd imagine it will be about the divide between commons and lords or something
    House of Commons and Lords came up last year so probably won't be repeated
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xxvine)
    You know for that Qu
    Do you only talk about 3 reforms? We won't have the time to address all of them will we?
    Yeah we definitely don't have to address all of them- i'd just pick out the main ones, like devolution, hra, house of lords reform- and just to slip in a few examples, you could take about FOIA or increased use of referendums
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Regarding constitutional reforms,

    What would you put for these reforms being significant and insignificant. I'm a bit stuck

    - Constitutional Reform Act 2005.
    - Supreme Court 2009.
    - Succession to the Crowns Act 2012-2013.

    My game plan at the moment for this question is to just throw in as many reforms as possible, because I'm struggling to develop in-depth explanations. Any help will be appreciated
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: October 11, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
Do you think sex education should be compulsory in schools?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.