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    (Original post by Wtsgd)
    what shall i do for the rest of the year?
    How many exams have you got in the summer?

    Make sure you study hard for those. For biochemistry type modules where I had to learn systems, even for Histopathology, I used a lot of YouTube video as it was very visual it helped me learn.

    How much does your final third year project weigh? You have to work out whether you are stronger at coursework or exams. In my case I was way better at coursework. So in my third year I made sure I got firsts in all my coursework, to cash in the extra points.

    The uni I went to I wasn't happy with their way of examining and setting exams. It was done with no consideration. We had back to back exams for 4 days. Which is why I failed my second year and had to repeat it. It was very disheartening for me. But I managed to pull through.
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    Hello. I'm currently studying my As (Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics and History) i'm looking for a career pathway in biochemistry but i am aware there are many different courses off this... the opportunities are endless and i'm not sure where to start? does anyone have any advice on which course they study etc
    Thanks
    Charlotte
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    I am going into S6 this year and I am thinking of doing biomedical science at Glasgow. I want to work for nhs but I don't know if I will have to do a postgraduate (Msc or doctorate) to get a job in nhs. Plus I don't know how the accreditation and registring with HCPC work. It would be really helpful if someone could explain this. And also is biomedical science a good career choice?
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    (Original post by Potatoo)
    I am going into S6 this year and I am thinking of doing biomedical science at Glasgow. I want to work for nhs but I don't know if I will have to do a postgraduate (Msc or doctorate) to get a job in nhs. Plus I don't know how the accreditation and registring with HCPC work. It would be really helpful if someone could explain this. And also is biomedical science a good career choice?
    Hi. If you want to work in the NHS, you need to have HCPC registration. For that, your course must be accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). In the link below, you can download a guide of universities and courses which are accredited:

    https://www.ibms.org/go/qualifications/ibms-courses

    At Glagow, the University of Strathclyde has a Biomedical Science BSc which is accredited so you can do that and be eligible for HCPC reg and NHS healthcare biomed scientist work.

    If the university/course is not listed, then it is not accredited and hence you cannot have the HCPC registration unless you do further study/training (e.g. MSc). I have just finished a biomed degree at University of Birmingham and it is not accredited by IBMS so if I wanted to work in the NHS as a healthcare scientist then I need to get further qualification.
    NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP) is a good option if you are thinking of NHS science work.

    As for the job itself, I could tell you about my degree and career options. I specialised in cancer in my final year (took a cancer module and did a research project in this field). I can work in university research labs and publish my work in scientific journals, or I can work in scientific companies (e.g. companies that develop antibodies to aid research and clinical diagnostics). If I want to become a lecturer and run my own research then I need to do a PhD.

    The job as a research scientist is quite good and you can manipulate experiments to adjust to what you need to find out. Your work can be "translated" into clinical trials and you may be working with consultants that run tests on patients. In the lab, you will be working with cells, chemicals and with animals in various ways (e.g. testing drug effects).
    At the basic starting level (e.g. lab assistant/technician) you will be earning around £18,000-£20,000 pa. If you qualify further and are more experienced (e.g. senior lecturer and run your own research), you can be earning up to about £70,000 pa.

    I don't know much about NHS scientists, but from what I heard you can progress up the bands with further qualification and more experience. The salary ranges are probably similar to those in research (all depends on qualifications and experience). The job itself involves running routine specialised diagnostic tests in labs and you will be working with tissue biopsies and fluids like bloods and urine. Some specialties involve more patient contact than others (e.g. fertility treatment work). I would suggest getting some work experience in hospital labs if you can to get a better idea of what a career is like. I know more about research career rather than clinical so try contacting work experience department or the labs themselves to ask if they do work experience.

    Hope this helps

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    (Original post by mj1dan2014)
    Hi. If you want to work in the NHS, you need to have HCPC registration. For that, your course must be accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). In the link below, you can download a guide of universities and courses which are accredited:

    https://www.ibms.org/go/qualifications/ibms-courses

    At Glagow, the University of Strathclyde has a Biomedical Science BSc which is accredited so you can do that and be eligible for HCPC reg and NHS healthcare biomed scientist work.

    If the university/course is not listed, then it is not accredited and hence you cannot have the HCPC registration unless you do further study/training (e.g. MSc). I have just finished a biomed degree at University of Birmingham and it is not accredited by IBMS so if I wanted to work in the NHS as a healthcare scientist then I need to get further qualification.
    NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP) is a good option if you are thinking of NHS science work.

    As for the job itself, I could tell you about my degree and career options. I specialised in cancer in my final year (took a cancer module and did a research project in this field). I can work in university research labs and publish my work in scientific journals, or I can work in scientific companies (e.g. companies that develop antibodies to aid research and clinical diagnostics). If I want to become a lecturer and run my own research then I need to do a PhD.

    The job as a research scientist is quite good and you can manipulate experiments to adjust to what you need to find out. Your work can be "translated" into clinical trials and you may be working with consultants that run tests on patients. In the lab, you will be working with cells, chemicals and with animals in various ways (e.g. testing drug effects).
    At the basic starting level (e.g. lab assistant/technician) you will be earning around £18,000-£20,000 pa. If you qualify further and are more experienced (e.g. senior lecturer and run your own research), you can be earning up to about £70,000 pa.

    I don't know much about NHS scientists, but from what I heard you can progress up the bands with further qualification and more experience. The salary ranges are probably similar to those in research (all depends on qualifications and experience). The job itself involves running routine specialised diagnostic tests in labs and you will be working with tissue biopsies and fluids like bloods and urine. Some specialties involve more patient contact than others (e.g. fertility treatment work). I would suggest getting some work experience in hospital labs if you can to get a better idea of what a career is like. I know more about research career rather than clinical so try contacting work experience department or the labs themselves to ask if they do work experience.

    Hope this helps

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    Thank you, that helped a lot
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    (Original post by Lord Jon)
    ---
    Hi Lord Jon

    I just graduated in Biomed Sci (at UCL) - how can i join the TSR biomed group? - so that i can chat more with other bio people

    Thanks
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    Hey!
    what work experience is recommended if you're applying for biomedicine at university?
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    Hi Guys,I'm a second year Biomedical Science student at the University of Portsmouth and in my spare time also work as an Ambassador for the Uni so have a pretty good experience of what it's like. I didn't live in halls in my first year so I can help with any housing enquires. However, being an Ambassador I have quite a good knowledge of all the halls, they're location and what they are like. So any questions, feel free to ask I also have a blog which i've just started. It will mainly be based around student life, what it was like being a fresher and being away from home, some of my life experiences and my travels around the world. It would be awesome if you wanted to follow the blog and comment, but that's up to you! And if any of you have any inspiration for future posts that would be great.Thank You!
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    Doing a PhD now in Immunology & some mentorring. Holla at me if you guys have any questions.
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    Hey guys, just a few questions:
    What careers can you go into after doing a BSc in biomedical science? What experiences did you write about in your personal statement? Why did you choose biomedical science?
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    (Original post by Jelola)
    Hey guys, just a few questions:
    What careers can you go into after doing a BSc in biomedical science? What experiences did you write about in your personal statement? Why did you choose biomedical science?
    Hi there

    To be honest, there are a a lot of options with biomed. You can go into research and academia/lecturing (you'd need a PhD after your degree), you can work for companies (e.g. pharmaceuticals) and you can train as a healthcare scientist to work in the NHS. Within these paths, there are many specialties you can go into (cancer biology, reproductive science, immunology and infection, etc). You can also go on to study medicine, dentistry, physician associate and more, if you decided that you want some more clinical/patient-oriented career. Also, you could always go into teaching in secondary and further education

    With choosing a healthcare scientist career, I'd advice looking at courses that are IBMS accredited:

    https://www.ibms.org/go/qualifications/ibms-courses

    Without this accreditation you cannot go into healthcare science directly. You'd need some sort of other qualification (e.g. MSc) after your degree that is healthcare science related. If the course is IBMS accredited, I believe you could go straight in.

    In terms of applying, I applied for medicine so my PS was all about that but I got in to Medical Science BMedSc in Birmingham anyway in 2013 (I've just graduated; was unsuccessful for medicine at the time so am reapplying now with a degree in hand). My BMedSc is an equivalent of BSc Biomed. I think if you are applying purely for biomed, it would be good to say why you want to do it, talk about your interest in science and what skills/transferable skills you have that would help you in biomed (e.g. good focus, analytical skills, etc). I heard it can be hard to get direct biomed experience, which is why talking about transferable skills is a good way forward here.

    Hope this helps. If you have any questions, feel free to ask me
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    Starting Biomedical Science at Hertfordshire this September
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    Hey, I need help on what work experience I would need in year 12/13 for Biomed, I need it to write on my personal statement.
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    (Original post by Paladin597)
    Hey, I need help on what work experience I would need in year 12/13 for Biomed, I need it to write on my personal statement.
    Tbh all the work experiences I did was nothing related to biomed, but as long as you link the skills (teamwork, leadership, passion etc etc) of your work experience or volunteering to biomed it would be more than enough thats what I did
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    (Original post by FemaleBo55)
    Tbh all the work experiences I did was nothing related to biomed, but as long as you link the skills (teamwork, leadership, passion etc etc) of your work experience or volunteering to biomed it would be more than enough thats what I did
    Alright, thx. And can you answer this questions for me pls.

    What makes you want to do Biomedical Science at Uni?
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    (Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
    Doing a PhD now in Immunology & some mentorring. Holla at me if you guys have any questions.
    Hi
    I'm going into my final year of Biomed. I was thinking of applying for a PhD after my undergraduate degree but I'm not really familar with the process. What exactly do I need to do to apply. And also how would you arrange funding for a PhD?
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    (Original post by sofiamalik_1995)
    Hi
    I'm going into my final year of Biomed. I was thinking of applying for a PhD after my undergraduate degree but I'm not really familar with the process. What exactly do I need to do to apply. And also how would you arrange funding for a PhD?
    There are several ways you can get into a PhD programme.

    If you're in third year for Biomed, are you going to be doing a research project in your final year? If so, then do not pick one because it sounds like you'll find the cure to cancer by the end of it- pick one that has the core biomedical research techniques: PCR, flow cytometry and tissue/cell culturing techniques.

    Generally it is quite hard for an undergraduate to get on a funded PhD programme straight after university. You'd would very much likely need to graduate with a first and have done a research project in your final year. You'd also have to do some serious sucking up to your supervisors and be their golden child as otherwise they'll most likely prefer a more experienced person. (Learn how to bake cakes- scientists are suckers for cake!).

    Having said all this, I would very much strongly recommend doing a MSc (with at least 4 months of research project included) or Mres if you want to do research.

    The problem with Biomedical Sciences is it is plagued with students who want to do medicine or dentistry. You do a lot of general biology like anatomy, but do not cover the basic molecular things in near enough detail for research. When you do a good MSc or Mres, 90% of students want to do a PhD afterwards so it very much supports this.

    Talk to your personal tutor and they'll offer you good advice.

    Funding is the trickiest part of research.
    You can fund yourself (i.e. have no salary until you can get some data and beg for a charity to fund you), but this is unrealistic unless you're super rich and have a kick ass project in mind.

    Or you could register for a PhD well planned out before which already has funding. (FindaphD.com).

    Or you could get your employer to pay for your PhD. (This is what I've done so I can't really help much with the other funding aspects).

    Hope this helped!
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    (Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
    Doing a PhD now in Immunology & some mentorring. Holla at me if you guys have any questions.
    Hi, I'm looking to do a PhD after my MSc in Immunology. I'm considering a PhD position for September 2018. I hear that you must contact a potential supervisor before you make an application? Did you have to do this and if you did, could you provide some insight?

    Many thanks!
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    (Original post by BioGeek)
    Hi, I'm looking to do a PhD after my MSc in Immunology.
    Another Immunologist :jumphug:

    (You picked a good subject for PhDs. Immunology is such a hot topic).


    I'm considering a PhD position for September 2018. I hear that you must contact a potential supervisor before you make an application? Did you have to do this and if you did, could you provide some insight?

    Many thanks!
    Again, it was slightly different for me because my employer sorted all this out for me.

    However it is pretty unheard of getting on a PhD project without visiting the lab beforehand and talking to the supervisor.
    Think of it this way. You'll be spending 3+ years in this lab. Would you not want to see what sort of place it is first before applying?

    The best way to get into a PhD programme is by having some work experience in that lab.

    Are you just about to start your MSc in Immunology?

    If so, simply asking your research supervisor if you could carry on with your MSc research project to a PhD, which means pick your lab for your project extrememly carefully. (Is the lab rich? Are they doing interesting current work?).
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    (Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
    Another Immunologist :jumphug:

    (You picked a good subject for PhDs. Immunology is such a hot topic).




    Again, it was slightly different for me because my employer sorted all this out for me.

    However it is pretty unheard of getting on a PhD project without visiting the lab beforehand and talking to the supervisor.
    Think of it this way. You'll be spending 3+ years in this lab. Would you not want to see what sort of place it is first before applying?

    The best way to get into a PhD programme is by having some work experience in that lab.

    Are you just about to start your MSc in Immunology?

    If so, simply asking your research supervisor if you could carry on with your MSc research project to a PhD, which means pick your lab for your project extrememly carefully. (Is the lab rich? Are they doing interesting current work?).

    Yes I will be starting this October at Imperial College London. I will be looking to do my PhD elsewhere due to the high living costs! My research project is 7 months long, so I should be prepared for doctoral research after I finish. I also plan to work in a research lab after my finish my MSc prior to starting my PhD. Yes, my interest in immunology began when I was introduced into the concept of monoclonal antibodies, I hope to do a PhD in this field with elements of immunology and oncology combined. Where are you doing your PhD atm?
 
 
 
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