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#861
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#861
aww crap. there goes my social life.
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Jammertal
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#862
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#862
:eek: Poor you.
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OppressedMass
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#863
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#863
Work was a biatch tonight. I gave away like £100000 worth of drink to mates and there was a gang of rotund moustached Americans ordering reall(EDIT)y obscure drinks... Good tips though.
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Sijia
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#864
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#864
(Original post by OppressedMass)
Work was a biatch tonight. I gave away like £100000 worth of drink to mates and there was a gang of rotund moustached Americans ordering reall(EDIT)y obscure drinks... Good tips though.
Another reason to always have Google handy.:p:
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dismal_laundry
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#865
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#865
About rotund...heard a radio article last night about how the professional body of US Radiologists have issued a report on the decline of the efficacy of radiological diagnoses due to rising obesity in the US population over the last fifteen years. This applies to X Ray, CAT scans and to MRI- in some cases, patients were just too fat to fit into the MRI tube. It's becoming a real problem.
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OppressedMass
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#866
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#866
(Original post by dismal_laundry)
About rotund...heard a radio article last night about how the professional body of US Radiologists have issued a report on the decline of the efficacy of radiological diagnoses due to rising obesity in the US population over the last fifteen years. This applies to X Ray, CAT scans and to MRI- in some cases, patients were just too fat to fit into the MRI tube. It's becoming a real problem.
Cheered me right up! Quite sad though.

The only solution I can imagine is to widen everything in the US. People plainly aren't getting any slimmer.
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Jammertal
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#867
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#867
... and if they don't get the necessary medical supply they'll die sooner, lower expenses for the health insurances.... :eek3:
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dismal_laundry
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#868
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#868
A real commitment to public health education on the part of the US government might help over time- this was the case with smoking over about 25 years. But that would mean their taking on huge fast food and food product transnationals...can't see it at the moment. Diabetes, and especially in children! is on the rise- there is a direct correlation with obesity.
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dismal_laundry
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#869
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#869
But the health costs associated with obesity are huge, in the meantime.
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OppressedMass
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#870
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#870
It's not the government's responsibility to con people into eating healthily.

EDIT: Love Jammertal's pragmatism. Let 'em die!
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dismal_laundry
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#871
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#871
That depends on your take on the function, role, and responsibilities of public health. Also, obesity in my country tends to be class related- poorer people eat more junk, fat and refined carbohydrates. There is a tremendous amount of poverty in the United States. Fresh fruit and vegetables are expensive, whole grains etc. are packaged and priced at the high end of the market- look at the meteoric rise of Whole Foods Markets (organic grocers)- built on middle classes' disposable incomes.

But I digress...
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Jammertal
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#872
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#872
Yeah that problem comes up slowly here, too. But hwat to do? Tax McD? Would mean that the poorer people have even less money to spend, thus economic problems, bigger education division... higher wages? Can't be enforced by politicians...

But the problems connected with obsevity add to the labour-costs because the health system is financed over the wages, hence my cynical comment: there actually were claims not to give artifical joints to over 80-years-old.
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dismal_laundry
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#873
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#873
Don't tax McD, compel it, through response to educated popular demand, to offer better food to the public. It's getting the public to realise the benfits of better nutrition that will take a lot of public health education over a long time.

I don't understand about the joints...
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Jammertal
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#874
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#874
Well, somebody said that the health insurances shouldn't pay for artificial joints (namely hip prothesises) for old people in order to cut spending (they won't live long enough to make them profitable).
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OppressedMass
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#875
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#875
McDonalds in the UK have a new range of salads and stuff. Apparantly not very popular though.
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Jammertal
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#876
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#876
Yep, flabby salad with greasy sauces. :puke: One of the salads has more fat and sugar in it than a BigMac. :eek:
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OppressedMass
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#877
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#877
I wouldn't be surprised.
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Magali
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#878
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#878
A mate of mine who has a part time job in maccy d's told me that since they brought out the carrot sticks for happy meals she has NEVER seen anyone order them... so even giving more choice doesnt work.

Perhaps the idea of a "fat tax" on junk food is a good idea and the extra money could be used to subsidise healthier food, so poorer people would be able to afford healthier food. The money could also be used to increase awarness of the problems obesity is causing.
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dismal_laundry
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#879
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#879
(Original post by Jammertal)
Well, somebody said that the health insurances shouldn't pay for artificial joints (namely hip prothesises) for old people in order to cut spending (they won't live long enough to make them profitable).
OK Jammertal, I know that you are only quoting someone else, and no offense to you, sincerely, but, I really don't agree with that. Old people have paid, up front, for those services through a lifetime of taxation and contribution to society. Also, it's a stepping into a moral minefield to deny one class of patient a service...if you take that argument in a slightly different direction, why continue dialysis of a chronically ill teenager whose kidneys have failed? He will continue to deteriorate even with dialysis, and if he becomes really debilitated, his chances of surviving a transplant are reduced. Hip replacements are critical surgery for older people- if they can become mobile, their circulation, respiration, psychological outlook, and ability to live independently all improve. My grandmother had a hip replacement at 80 and lived 8 more happy years...who decides whether or not she should have had those years?
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dismal_laundry
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#880
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#880
Sorry about the heaviness people...
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