This discussion is closed.
homefind
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#861
Report 6 years ago
#861
oops quoted wrong person


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
neelam123h
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#862
Report 6 years ago
#862
does anyone have a document off all the 6 mark questions that can come up?
0
chelley2
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#863
Report 6 years ago
#863
(Original post by homefind)
Cell organelle are replicated, however number of cells don't increase during interphase


Posted from TSR Mobile
I was just doing this paper too.im so stupid I forgot the word "interphase" I just put "the cells are in the S phase where DNA replicates" .got 0 -.-
Have you done 6b) that question does not make sense at all


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
homefind
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#864
Report 6 years ago
#864
(Original post by chelley2)
I was just doing this paper too.im so stupid I forgot the word "interphase" I just put "the cells are in the S phase where DNA replicates" .got 0 -.-
Have you done 6b) that question does not make sense at all


Posted from TSR Mobile
It's on about how enzymes are specific I think, therefore talk about all that good stuff


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
Lalalamide
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#865
Report 6 years ago
#865
what are the advantages of selective breeding and what definition would u use in the exam?
0
gcse2012
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#866
Report 6 years ago
#866
(Original post by gcse2012)
So when they are " / / " they still count as homologous chromosomes/ a homologous pair? And when they are / / do they count as two chromosomes as one of the chromosomes will have originally come from a sperm cell and one of the chromosomes will have come from an egg cell?
Also, when they are X X is each chromosome (X) made up of sister chromatids, and one pair of the sister chromatids is from the father and one pair of the sister chromatids from the mother.

Sorry if that it a very confused set of questions but I am very confused by the wording of everything when I try and link it to / and X etc!
Anyone able to help me with the above questions? My questions are in response to havana-affairs post but I don't know how to quote is post as well as mine. Just had a look at the Nelson Thornes book and it says this "In the first division the homologous chromosomes pair up". Does that just mean they align next to each other? It then says "the homologous pairs have separated" does that just mean that the two chromosomes that are homologous chromosomes just split into different cells?
0
science-oliver
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#867
Report 6 years ago
#867
(Original post by Lalalamide)
what are the advantages of selective breeding and what definition would u use in the exam?
Advantages:-

Improves the species resistance to disease, meaning if more of specie is resistant to disease in for example cows, less number of cows die so increased yield of meat/milk

Which leads on to second advantage

Increased yield means cheaper prices for the meat/milk

3rd advantage) interbreed a certain characteristic meaning the specie causes less damage to each other

4th) food can be produced more efficiently of a consistently high quality which also means reduced prices
1
Layontheland
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#868
Report 6 years ago
#868
(Original post by Jimmy20002012)
Thats actually a formula I think, which aqa expected us to kind of work out somehow. Its always 2^ power of how many different chromatids you have I think


Posted from TSR Mobile
In fact in maths wise. We use this to determine how many different combinations can be formed for example. How many different combinations. Search this online for it to be explained


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
Layontheland
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#869
Report 6 years ago
#869
(Original post by chelley2)
I was just doing this paper too.im so stupid I forgot the word "interphase" I just put "the cells are in the S phase where DNA replicates" .got 0 -.-
Have you done 6b) that question does not make sense at all


Posted from TSR Mobile
That strange. Because in one question where they asked during what stage was dna replicated. The examiners accepted both s phase or interphase.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
chelley2
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#870
Report 6 years ago
#870
(Original post by Layontheland)
That strange. Because in one question where they asked during what stage was dna replicated. The examiners accepted both s phase or interphase.


Posted from TSR Mobile
I know weird isnt it,I guess choice of key words is important



Posted from TSR Mobile
0
Secret.
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#871
Report 6 years ago
#871
(Original post by science-oliver)
Oooops misread it, although I still don't get it after I've misread it, why when transpiration is not occurring at night is there greater water movement in the trunk than in the branches?


I don't think there is, where does it say that?
0
Sophie1994
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#872
Report 6 years ago
#872
(Original post by Paulineuh)
I'm confused, I always thought that a higher water potential meant it was closer to pure water = 0 so anything lower meant it had proteins/solutes in them so are more negative.

Which exam paper is that?:confused:
Yes me too, that was what I was confused about. Well this question wasn't on any of the papers from the new spec so I'm guessing the old spec then.
0
science-oliver
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#873
Report 6 years ago
#873
(Original post by Secret.)
I don't think there is, where does it say that?
Okay it doesn't matter
0
Simran Mars Foster
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#874
Report 6 years ago
#874
Can someone explain immunological comparisions of proteins please. Can't get my head around them it.
0
Magenta96
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#875
Report 6 years ago
#875
why is it that when distance increases, pressure in the aorta decreases? I don't see the link and how does friction reduce pressure?.
0
myah_94
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#876
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#876
I don't get 1)a) answer on the specimen paper..is there anyone who understands it and can explain?
0
myah_94
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#877
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#877
(Original post by Magenta96)
why is it that when distance increases, pressure in the aorta decreases? I don't see the link and how does friction reduce pressure?.
I think it's because the ventricles relax and the muscle in the wall of aorta contracts to narrow the lumen. Not sure about the other bit
0
myah_94
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#878
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#878
(Original post by Magenta96)
why is it that when distance increases, pressure in the aorta decreases? I don't see the link and how does friction reduce pressure?.
Actually, it's because of friction
0
lettucesoap
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#879
Report 6 years ago
#879
has anybody done the January 2011 paper?
this **** is hard
0
Magenta96
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#880
Report 6 years ago
#880
(Original post by lettucesoap)
has anybody done the January 2011 paper?
this **** is hard
ugh I know, it's a good thing they're quite generous with the grade boundaries though
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • Coventry University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • University of Birmingham
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (17)
7.17%
They might tell the bully (25)
10.55%
I don't think they'd understand (40)
16.88%
It might lead to more bullying (84)
35.44%
There's nothing they could do (71)
29.96%

Watched Threads

View All