Maths year 11

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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Alright turn these into fractions:

    (a) 0.145

    EXAMPLE:
    0.145=\frac{0.145}{1}=\frac{145}  {1000}=\frac{29}{200}

    (b) 0.1

    (c) 0.65

    (d) 0.841

    ..and a bit more challenging in the mix

    (e) 0.33\dot3...
    What did you do after 145/1000 the 29 bit I didn't understand it.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Alright turn these into fractions:

    (a) 0.145

    EXAMPLE:
    0.145=\frac{0.145}{1}=\frac{145}  {1000}=\frac{29}{200}

    (b) 0.1

    (c) 0.65

    (d) 0.841

    ..and a bit more challenging in the mix

    (e) 0.33\dot3...


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    What did you do after 145/1000 the 29 bit I didn't understand it.
    I divided top and bottom by 5 in order to simplify it down.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    I divided top and bottom by 5 in order to simplify it down.


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    Looks good. Though for the first one it should be 200, not 100, on the denominator.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Looks good. Though for the first one it should be 200, not 100, on the denominator.
    What do I do with the 841 one?

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    What do I do with the 841 one?

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    Just leave it as it is. 841 is a prime number so you cannot reduce that fraction any further.


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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Just leave it as it is. 841 is a prime number so you cannot reduce that fraction any further.


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    What about E

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    What about E

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    Slightly trickier method:

    x=0.333....
    10x=3.333...
    ---------------------------
    Take x away from 10x
    9x=3
    x=3/9=1/3=0.333....
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Slightly trickier method:

    x=0.333....
    10x=3.333...
    ---------------------------
    Take x away from 10x
    9x=3
    x=3/9=1/3=0.333....
    I don't understand where X and 10 comes from and how you work it out?
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    I don't understand where X and 10 comes from and how you work it out?
    That's the trick.

    If we let x=0.333... then we can get 10x by multiplying both sides by 10; hence where 3.333... comes from. Then when we subtract x from 10x, all the decimal places cancel out and we are left with 3 because 3.333... - 0.333... = 3
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    That's the trick.

    If we let x=0.333... then we can get 10x by multiplying both sides by 10; hence where 3.333... comes from. Then when we subtract x from 10x, all the decimal places cancel out and we are left with 3 because 3.333... - 0.333... = 3
    Can you do more examples of these please on a piece of paper?
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    That's the trick.

    If we let x=0.333... then we can get 10x by multiplying both sides by 10; hence where 3.333... comes from. Then when we subtract x from 10x, all the decimal places cancel out and we are left with 3 because 3.333... - 0.333... = 3
    You could consider the sum of the geometric series  \displaystyle \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} (3\times10^{-n}) .
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can you do more examples of these please on a piece of paper?
    Try finding fraction equivalent to  0.\dot{9} .
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    (Original post by Ano123)
    You could consider the sum of the geometric series  \displaystyle \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} (3\times10^{-n}) .
    I could. But I choose not to for a GCSE student.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    I could. But I choose not to for a GCSE student.
    Yah I know but I bet you never considered it this way before.
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can you do more examples of these please on a piece of paper?
    Try turning these into fractions and use the examples below for help:

    (a) 0.\dot5
    (b) 0.\dot5\dot8
    (c) 0.\dot9\dot8
    (c) 0.\dot24\dot5
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1471197261.802993.jpg
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    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1471197281.698555.jpg
Views: 29
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Try turning these into fractions and use the examples below for help:

    (a) 0.\dot5
    (b) 0.\dot5\dot8
    (c) 0.\dot9\dot8
    (c) 0.\dot24\dot5
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1471197261.802993.jpg
Views: 29
Size:  138.3 KB
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1471197281.698555.jpg
Views: 29
Size:  145.0 KB

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    Could you check this please.
    I will do those in a bit


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Could you check this please.
    I will do those in a bit


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    Good


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    I was the same in year 10, I didn't realise how important Maths was until I was halfway through year 11. I was getting D's and C's in year 10 and half of year 11, but in January I realised I was under achieving and I was doubting my abilities, so from January I started working on the subject I found most difficult, and even though I didn't like my teacher I asked for her help, and I was persistant with my studying at home and I was achieving high B's and well onto A's by the time I sat my exams in June, so you can do it. My best advice is to practise exam paper questions and always practise the topics you find most difficult. Good Luck 😄
 
 
 
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