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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Indeed, 5. e4 is the engine move, with well over half a pawn advantage for white. I think the problem comes of a lack of really thinking about the opening. Playing d4 so often, I should have some understanding of the semi-slav, but I really don't. I think I'm a bit more versed in the Queen's Gambit, either variation, the normal slav, the King's Indian, the Grunfeld, etc. I even thought about 5. e4 but it didn't look like anything I'd seen before, like I had this dogmatic idea in my head "well, you don't play e4 in this system, you play e3". But I suppose the reason is that black doesn't sit around twiddling his thumbs with some bull like h6 but clamps down on the e4 square with Nf6. I always play e4 in King's Indian structures for instance and I recognise its strength. At least I know what to do if ever faced with this ridiculous opening again. A problem, I think, in regards to this is how many traps and tricks there are in openings. I've been caught twice (fool me twice, shame on me...) in queen's gambit accepted lines where the rook skewers the queen and bishop after we've opened everything up on the queenside, I've been rekt by the fried liver on some rare occasions when I've played black in e4-e5, having forgotten the theory...I'm just wary of being aggressive in openings lol.

    Yeah, I can see it from their point of view. Especially since they may have rightly felt that they'd had an edge all game, and with the pretty sizeable rating disparity had lots of rating points for incentive. I dunno, in a blitz game, I wouldn't care so much. But the longer the time control gets, the more class I expect. One could argue that I had used a lot more time up to that point than him as well, and that he had a right to exploit that.



    The volume of words in my posts is growing at an alarming rate lol. Anyhow, I'm not sure it's that hard. The captain of the D team (who is now president) I beat very quickly in blitz, I think it was the second game I ever played at the club. I've played other guys who are on the lower teams, I think, and I'd say they tend to be slightlybetter than me, though I dunno if they play for D or C (A and B team players just destroy you lol). I was basically asked if I wanted to join a team and I pretty much gave a "maybe" and not much more came of it; I don't think they're too fussy. I get the sense that if you want to play competitive chess, and you have some degree of competency - and obviously, you've a lot more than that - they can get it done. I missed a lot of sessions and became somewhat estranged from the club in favour of pool, which ran sessions at the same time, which might explain why there wasn't any follow-up on my saying I was interested.

    It's often the case that strategy is unsound, but in certain structures, everyone knows the plan. For instance if you end up in a typical Sicilian Dragon (I am aware that there are less dynamic ones, but we're talking the main main lines here), a 1600 knows that they can just play g4, h4, h5 smash open the kingside, and kill you (problem is, of course, that you're trying to kill them too) If you play the King's Indian everyone and their dog knows that black prepares for an f5 break supported by a rook and an ensuing bishop pair-supported kingside storm while white tries to dominate the queenside. If you play an Open Sicilian, we all know that white takes aim at the weak d5 square, hoping to plant a knight there. At least, most of the time players seem to go for these key strategical motifs against me.

    Oh yeah a tactical "sac" which regains material (or checkmates) is a no brainer. Positional sacs are the ones that are hard to make I guess. Except for those juicy exchange sacs for black against the Queenside castled position in the Sicilian to open the b file, love making those. (though I suppose this is half positional, half tactical)
    Thinking in the opening is definitely important - I mean, have you seen how long Jerry takes to think in his openings/early middlegames? Like sometimes he spends 5 minutes in a 15 minute came simply coming up with a plan, whilst his opponent blitzes out some reasonable opening moves. Then, he easily finds strong moves (he just follows his plan and maintains tactical awareness) whilst his opponent starts to take longer and longer because he doesn't know what to do and eventually gets crushed in his confusion. I'd really like to play like that, but I don't trust my planning/strategising ability lol.
    And yeah understanding the fundamentals of your openings help to punish bad play. For example the fundamental idea after Nc3 is the threat of e4, which will be happily played if not prevented.

    Alright I'll try to get into the D team and see if I can work my way up lol. I don't feel I have too much talent at all in chess; it's not something that comes naturally to me, but I still feel I can improve to a reasonable standard. I feel as though lessons (from a master) would help a lot but no idea where to get those.

    Yeah I've realised we're basically exchanging chess dissertations XD. But I think it's very enjoyable and useful to discuss chess.
    Generally 1600s understand the basic strategy but if in unfamiliar waters there'd be a myriad of strategical blunders (I'd probably do the same tbh). If you steer the game into positional grounds they'd struggle.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Thinking in the opening is definitely important - I mean, have you seen how long Jerry takes to think in his openings/early middlegames? Like sometimes he spends 5 minutes in a 15 minute came simply coming up with a plan, whilst his opponent blitzes out some reasonable opening moves. Then, he easily finds strong moves (he just follows his plan and maintains tactical awareness) whilst his opponent starts to take longer and longer because he doesn't know what to do and eventually gets crushed in his confusion. I'd really like to play like that, but I don't trust my planning/strategising ability lol.
    And yeah understanding the fundamentals of your openings help to punish bad play. For example the fundamental idea after Nc3 is the threat of e4, which will be happily played if not prevented.

    Alright I'll try to get into the D team and see if I can work my way up lol. I don't feel I have too much talent at all in chess; it's not something that comes naturally to me, but I still feel I can improve to a reasonable standard. I feel as though lessons (from a master) would help a lot but no idea where to get those.

    Yeah I've realised we're basically exchanging chess dissertations XD. But I think it's very enjoyable and useful to discuss chess.
    Generally 1600s understand the basic strategy but if in unfamiliar waters there'd be a myriad of strategical blunders (I'd probably do the same tbh). If you steer the game into positional grounds they'd struggle.
    That's a good point. I guess I'm too influenced by the grandmasters blitzing out like a dozen moves at the start of games. Their experience is vast, their theory/prep unimaginably deep, so to think that that is okay for the mediocre club players like me is a false equivalency I suppose. And another point: when grandmasters get caught in an opening they haven't seen yet, i.e. their opponent plays a novelty, this can often be when they spend the most time. Thirty minutes, forty minutes, hell, sometimes up to an hour (though what with the new 90 minutes control for the first 40 moves, as opposed to two hours, this might be a bit risky) on a move early in the game. So I guess it's a little bit important.

    How much have you played chess? If not much, I'd wager that you are at a level far above the vast majority who have played not much, which implies talent. I'm sure there'll be chess coaches around, how much they charge is another matter..

    Yeah, I find that the more you put things into words the better your understanding becomes. So writing is good. Indeed, I agree; whenever I'm faced with an unfamiliar opening I don't have a clue what the strategy is and just screw up in general.

    By the way, with regards to piece sacrifices...if you're not sick of me putting up like sixteen games a day, I was pretty happy with this one. https://www.chess.com/live/game/1711134003 It would seem that the correct plan for white is to push his pawns on the queenside, open up the file, and plant his rooks there, but I instinctively and stupidly pushed the last pawn and closed it for good (incidentally all other pawn pushes starting from b4 were "excellent" - I felt like a total patzer just pushing pawn after pawn but apparently it was correct for a while lol) So I thought whatever, and just went for a hack attack on the kingside. Then the sac...apparently it's sound, and taking is an inaccuracy. Victory for intuition, I suppose.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    That's a good point. I guess I'm too influenced by the grandmasters blitzing out like a dozen moves at the start of games. Their experience is vast, their theory/prep unimaginably deep, so to think that that is okay for the mediocre club players like me is a false equivalency I suppose. And another point: when grandmasters get caught in an opening they haven't seen yet, i.e. their opponent plays a novelty, this can often be when they spend the most time. Thirty minutes, forty minutes, hell, sometimes up to an hour (though what with the new 90 minutes control for the first 40 moves, as opposed to two hours, this might be a bit risky) on a move early in the game. So I guess it's a little bit important.

    How much have you played chess? If not much, I'd wager that you are at a level far above the vast majority who have played not much, which implies talent. I'm sure there'll be chess coaches around, how much they charge is another matter..

    Yeah, I find that the more you put things into words the better your understanding becomes. So writing is good. Indeed, I agree; whenever I'm faced with an unfamiliar opening I don't have a clue what the strategy is and just screw up in general.

    By the way, with regards to piece sacrifices...if you're not sick of me putting up like sixteen games a day, I was pretty happy with this one. https://www.chess.com/live/game/1711134003 It would seem that the correct plan for white is to push his pawns on the queenside, open up the file, and plant his rooks there, but I instinctively and stupidly pushed the last pawn and closed it for good (incidentally all other pawn pushes starting from b4 were "excellent" - I felt like a total patzer just pushing pawn after pawn but apparently it was correct for a while lol) So I thought whatever, and just went for a hack attack on the kingside. Then the sac...apparently it's sound, and taking is an inaccuracy. Victory for intuition, I suppose.
    Yep it's only really GMs and such who really have any justification for smashing out their openings moves (in non- bullet/fast blitz); everyone else should certainly spend a decent length of time making careful moves and planning, especially if your opponent makes a dubious move or two. You're right though, GMs are blitzing out moves at lightning speed and then a novelty and - *sudden pause for 2 minutes* lol.

    Haven't played chess very seriously for any length of time tbh, but I'd say I've been playing for a few months excluding that period when I was 8-12 where I literally didn't improve at all and was always a stark beginner lol. I don't think my brain was developed enough at the time to handle chess haha. But now I'm improving which is nice.
    Edit: Oh I must also mention that I've watched A LOT of chess videos (but never read a chess book in my life lol) so I've learnt quite a bit in that way. Definitely have not played too many games though; practice is key for me and that'll begin seriously when I go to Warwick.

    Watching specific opening videos will definitely help your strategy. Actually, you're a diamond member right? So there'll be a lot of good videos on openings (when I had a free trial I found that there were quite a few good Najdorf/Ruy ones).

    Haha I like that sac, very tactics trainer style. Although again I must point out that a bit more thought in the opening might have paid off (I understand 3|2 is pretty quick though). On Bf5 one thinks "That's strange, normally the only moves in this position are e6 and c6... why are they played and not Bf5 or something else?" and then you realise that e6 and c6 support the d5 pawn. Because after Bf5 cxd5 Qxd5 Nc3 Q(somewhere) e4 white is much better. And black is punished for his blatant lack of understanding of 1.d4 and even more so 2.c4.
    Also Bf5 in d4 openings can be risky because of a timely Qb3, hence why this move is not played all the time.
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    (Original post by IrrationalRoot)
    Yep it's only really GMs and such who really have any justification for smashing out their openings moves (in non- bullet/fast blitz); everyone else should certainly spend a decent length of time making careful moves and planning, especially if your opponent makes a dubious move or two. You're right though, GMs are blitzing out moves at lightning speed and then a novelty and - *sudden pause for 2 minutes* lol.

    Haven't played chess very seriously for any length of time tbh, but I'd say I've been playing for a few months excluding that period when I was 8-12 where I literally didn't improve at all and was always a stark beginner lol. I don't think my brain was developed enough at the time to handle chess haha. But now I'm improving which is nice.
    Edit: Oh I must also mention that I've watched A LOT of chess videos (but never read a chess book in my life lol) so I've learnt quite a bit in that way. Definitely have not played too many games though; practice is key for me and that'll begin seriously when I go to Warwick.

    Watching specific opening videos will definitely help your strategy. Actually, you're a diamond member right? So there'll be a lot of good videos on openings (when I had a free trial I found that there were quite a few good Najdorf/Ruy ones).

    Haha I like that sac, very tactics trainer style. Although again I must point out that a bit more thought in the opening might have paid off (I understand 3|2 is pretty quick though). On Bf5 one thinks "That's strange, normally the only moves in this position are e6 and c6... why are they played and not Bf5 or something else?" and then you realise that e6 and c6 support the d5 pawn. Because after Bf5 cxd5 Qxd5 Nc3 Q(somewhere) e4 white is much better. And black is punished for his blatant lack of understanding of 1.d4 and even more so 2.c4.
    Also Bf5 in d4 openings can be risky because of a timely Qb3, hence why this move is not played all the time.
    I recall a blitz match, quite possibly for the championship, between Anand and Kasparov; Anand spent well over a minute thinking in the opening of one of the games lol. I'm not sure it was even a novelty, I think it was standard. But I guess he was spooked..

    Ah, don't you think having learned the rules and played a bit when you were younger must have influenced something though? I mean, you say you aren't talented, but the best pretty much entirely inexperienced (i.e. lack of serious play or study) chess players I've met have still been quite weak; tactically and positionally, the whole shebang. But I suppose chess videos makes sense. Myself, I have been through a great deal of the kingscrusher catalogue, less (well, not in proportion to content - Kingscrusher puts out a vid like every minute it seems) of Chess Network but still loads.

    Yeah I haven't fully checked into the openings videos yet. I looked at the latest ones and there's stuff on openings I never play, I guess I might as well make use of the search functon and see what I can dig up. It is rather embarrassing that I am pretty clueless when it comes to the Ruy Lopez - very rarely play e4, if I do I always meet e5 with the Scotch (nice and simple..), and against e4 always play c5, or more liable to play e6 or c6 as alternatives rather than e5. I mean I know the first few moves and all but strategies, nah lol.

    I assumed it was bad but it was just laziness lol, I figured I can get a good position anyway. And ultimately my queenside expansion was fast and strong - dunno what compelled me to push b6 in the end, probably just thinking "space is good", but aside from that, I think I had a nice principled game going. Anyway, just 3|2, no biggy.

    Just played what I thought was a nice, brutal 30|0 QGD game (my opponent blundering away a pawn helped) but apparently I had 5 inaccuracies lol. Mostly of the "your advantage is slightly smaller but still very good" kind though.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    I recall a blitz match, quite possibly for the championship, between Anand and Kasparov; Anand spent well over a minute thinking in the opening of one of the games lol. I'm not sure it was even a novelty, I think it was standard. But I guess he was spooked..

    Ah, don't you think having learned the rules and played a bit when you were younger must have influenced something though? I mean, you say you aren't talented, but the best pretty much entirely inexperienced (i.e. lack of serious play or study) chess players I've met have still been quite weak; tactically and positionally, the whole shebang. But I suppose chess videos makes sense. Myself, I have been through a great deal of the kingscrusher catalogue, less (well, not in proportion to content - Kingscrusher puts out a vid like every minute it seems) of Chess Network but still loads.

    Yeah I haven't fully checked into the openings videos yet. I looked at the latest ones and there's stuff on openings I never play, I guess I might as well make use of the search functon and see what I can dig up. It is rather embarrassing that I am pretty clueless when it comes to the Ruy Lopez - very rarely play e4, if I do I always meet e5 with the Scotch (nice and simple..), and against e4 always play c5, or more liable to play e6 or c6 as alternatives rather than e5. I mean I know the first few moves and all but strategies, nah lol.

    I assumed it was bad but it was just laziness lol, I figured I can get a good position anyway. And ultimately my queenside expansion was fast and strong - dunno what compelled me to push b6 in the end, probably just thinking "space is good", but aside from that, I think I had a nice principled game going. Anyway, just 3|2, no biggy.

    Just played what I thought was a nice, brutal 30|0 QGD game (my opponent blundering away a pawn helped) but apparently I had 5 inaccuracies lol. Mostly of the "your advantage is slightly smaller but still very good" kind though.
    Chess is a poor man's attempt at mathematical ingenuity.
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    (Original post by Convex)
    Chess is a poor man's attempt at mathematical ingenuity.
    Why do people assume chess is a mathematician's game?


    If you go to an amateur chess tournament, you will see far more lawyers than you will engineers.
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    (Original post by Convex)
    Chess is a poor man's attempt at mathematical ingenuity.
    lol okay.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    lol okay.
    Can you give me a quick game please
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    (Original post by HaramiSalami)
    Why do people assume chess is a mathematician's game?

    If you go to an amateur chess tournament, you will see far more lawyers than you will engineers.
    I used to be a mathematician, am now a lawyer, and still more or less such at chess
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    Can someone fill me in since I died for a bit?

    13 1 20 8 42 john2054
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    (Original post by Electrospective)
    Can someone fill me in since I died for a bit?

    13 1 20 8 42 john2054
    On what? With regards to the tournament, all I know is I lost my game vs The Sexathlete (who then claimed he had cheated, which I assumed was a joke, but all his moves were perfect, so Idk lol)

    (Original post by Convex)
    Can you give me a quick game please
    Sorry had food. Nah I feel I've played enough chess for today. Good for most of the time though.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    On what? With regards to the tournament, all I know is I lost my game vs The Sexathlete (who then claimed he had cheated, which I assumed was a joke, but all his moves were perfect, so Idk lol).

    Yes. Ohh okay, Is it possible to cheat?
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    (Original post by Electrospective)
    Yes. Ohh okay, Is it possible to cheat?
    Yeah chess engines play near enough to perfect and you can just input the moves of your opponent and it tells you what to play.
    I thought he was just really good but I could not discern if his cheating comment was sarcasm lol.
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    (Original post by Electrospective)
    Can someone fill me in since I died for a bit?

    13 1 20 8 42 john2054
    Oh welcome back by the way.
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    (Original post by Convex)
    Chess is a poor man's attempt at mathematical ingenuity.
    Well no, and chess ability has nothing to do with mathematical ability in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Electrospective)
    x
    I lost my game
    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    I recall a blitz match, quite possibly for the championship, between Anand and Kasparov; Anand spent well over a minute thinking in the opening of one of the games lol. I'm not sure it was even a novelty, I think it was standard. But I guess he was spooked..

    Ah, don't you think having learned the rules and played a bit when you were younger must have influenced something though? I mean, you say you aren't talented, but the best pretty much entirely inexperienced (i.e. lack of serious play or study) chess players I've met have still been quite weak; tactically and positionally, the whole shebang. But I suppose chess videos makes sense. Myself, I have been through a great deal of the kingscrusher catalogue, less (well, not in proportion to content - Kingscrusher puts out a vid like every minute it seems) of Chess Network but still loads.

    Yeah I haven't fully checked into the openings videos yet. I looked at the latest ones and there's stuff on openings I never play, I guess I might as well make use of the search functon and see what I can dig up. It is rather embarrassing that I am pretty clueless when it comes to the Ruy Lopez - very rarely play e4, if I do I always meet e5 with the Scotch (nice and simple..), and against e4 always play c5, or more liable to play e6 or c6 as alternatives rather than e5. I mean I know the first few moves and all but strategies, nah lol.

    I assumed it was bad but it was just laziness lol, I figured I can get a good position anyway. And ultimately my queenside expansion was fast and strong - dunno what compelled me to push b6 in the end, probably just thinking "space is good", but aside from that, I think I had a nice principled game going. Anyway, just 3|2, no biggy.

    Just played what I thought was a nice, brutal 30|0 QGD game (my opponent blundering away a pawn helped) but apparently I had 5 inaccuracies lol. Mostly of the "your advantage is slightly smaller but still very good" kind though.
    And there was also the notable Anand vs Smirin where again Anand spent almost 2 minutes (this was blitz btw) on his 4th move which was very standard... unless we're talking about the same game?

    Yeah a lot of chess videos makes it so that you know what you're aiming for when playing chess; you know how the top players play and you aim to replicate the thought processes etc. whereas if you didn't watch any videos/study at all you'd probably improve much more slowly from practice.

    I never play e5 either lol, always c5 like you. But maybe I'd benefit from practising e5 since it's so universal; there must be a lot of chess to learn from such positions. Usually my games don't even go into normal openings because I generally play quite weak players and they never play mainlines (like you'll always see Bowdler attack and pushing rook pawns unnecessarily etc.), which is largely the reason why I want to get to a higher rating.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Yeah chess engines play near enough to perfect and you can just input the moves of your opponent and it tells you what to play.
    I thought he was just really good but I could not discern if his cheating comment was sarcasm lol.
    I would PM but he's banned too. :rofl:

    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Oh welcome back by the way.

    Fankss mate. Tbh I should leave seeing as I need to prepare myself for A2

    (Original post by Matrix123)
    I lost my game
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hi Matty. Awwh, it was all fun anyways (:
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    (Original post by Electrospective)
    I would PM but he's banned too. :rofl:




    Fankss mate. Tbh I should leave seeing as I need to prepare myself for A2



    Hi Matty. Awwh, it was all fun anyways (:
    Hi, how are you?

    Haha yeah
    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Hi, how are you?

    Haha yeah
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm alright fanks, and yourself?
 
 
 
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