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    I guess pupils can become accustomed to anything, including shouting, that silent treating sounds a good shout
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    (Original post by robo donkey)
    I guess pupils can become accustomed to anything, including shouting, that silent treating sounds a good shout
    It's always worked for me.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Try silent smouldering. Stand very still, with a face like thunder and do nothing except drum your fingers on the desk, filing cabinet, whatever. They'll start shushing each other up. Then speak very quietly. They expect ranting. Defeat their expectations with icy coldness. Saves the vocal cords as well. Remember, you don't have to feel anger, only fake it convincingly.
    I LOVE this method. Use it about 5 times a day at least haha.
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    I'm totally remembering this for my PGCE if and when I start this year
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    (Original post by Becca)
    I LOVE this method. Use it about 5 times a day at least haha.
    I think of it as green teaching - energy saving.
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    Yep, fan of the silent treatment here too. It has never completely failed me (touch wood. Will definitely need it tomorrow so may regret saying that!)
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    I think of it as green teaching - energy saving.
    Yep, And I make a point of calmly saving 'I'm not wasting my energy or voice on you - I'll just sit here and we can carry on when your ready and make the lesson time back in your time'. - As said before, just stand there and wait, looking mean!
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    Singing Bowls were also recommended to us on my PGCE to get class attention - hideous sound!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bpw53tN6h8E
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    My other favourite get the class quiet things:

    Ring a bell
    Countdown with hand in the air
    Quiet sign (thumb up/finger on lips etc)
    Have a poster hanging up with QUIET on it, go and stand there and point at it.

    NEVER rush to start a lesson until you have total quiet. Just stand confidently and it'll come.
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Yep, And I make a point of calmly saving 'I'm not wasting my energy or voice on you - I'll just sit here and we can carry on when your ready and make the lesson time back in your time'. - As said before, just stand there and wait, looking mean!
    Mean is good. This face, not this one.
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    (Original post by Becca)
    My other favourite get the class quiet things:

    Ring a bell
    Countdown with hand in the air
    Quiet sign (thumb up/finger on lips etc)
    Have a poster hanging up with QUIET on it, go and stand there and point at it.

    NEVER rush to start a lesson until you have total quiet. Just stand confidently and it'll come.
    Absolutely.
    I get the impression most of you are primary, so some of my methods might be a bit severe....
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Singing Bowls were also recommended to us on my PGCE to get class attention - hideous sound!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bpw53tN6h8E
    Goodness me, that's very right on. I have been known to whip a whistle out of my desk drawer to signal the end of group working that's got too loud. A colleague has a little hand bell. And then of course, there's the classic, 'STFU!' if all else fails.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Absolutely.
    I get the impression most of you are primary, so some of my methods might be a bit severe....
    I am primary now, but all of the methods I mentioned worked successfully for me in secondary too :yep:
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    (Original post by Becca)
    I am primary now, but all of the methods I mentioned worked successfully for me in secondary too :yep:
    Of course, the best method of all is no longer permitted:
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    One of my typical pupils:
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    (Original post by affinity89)
    Having a real battle with my class at the moment. They are just so noisy and they really struggle to listen. I like to have lots of partner-talk interaction in my lessons, but it is getting to the point where I might have to stop that sort of thing. My teacher has given me some extra strategies to try and overcome the problem, but I am finding it really hard. I am just not a shouty sort of person. Standing in front of the class was a big deal lol [I am one of those people who doesn't ever speak in seminars etc], so tackling this sort of disruption is going to be an uphill struggle.

    I've got the class all day tomorrow. Quite literally from morning registration until home time. So, I feel like it is going to be make or break for me in that class. :/
    To get attention, I've been known to play this on the IWB- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2VhB7vaZI0

    In terms of regulating noise level, I have....


    Mr. Blackout's Patent Noise-O-Meter!

    Marked "Perfect", "Little Too Loud", "Far too Loud", with a post-it note on an arrow. The class know that every minute the arrow spends on either of the "Too Louds" is a minute off their playtime.

    All I have to do is move the arrow, or even reach towards it, and they fall silent. Don't even have to say anything.

    Try something similar- you could probably make one from sugar paper and laminate it.

    The key thing is to set the expectation clearly- "We're talking to our partners, so there will be some noise, but I DON'T want to hear anyone talking loudly and disturbing other people"- and then enforce it. If you have a NoiseOMeter, and they know that every minute you are unhappy with the noise is a minute off playtime, they'll quickly learn.

    Because you're not setting exact levels, rather communicating your expectations clearly, you can use it for any desired level of noise too.

    I also don't like complete silence, because someone's always tempted to talk. I like to play some music whilst they're writing, for example last week when writing stories about Boudicca I played appropriate celtic-y music, and made it clear that it was playing VERY quietly and that I always wanted to be able to hear it.
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    Teaching my first lesson in school number two tomorrow!! Woohoo :-D
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    Today was a bit better.

    I used the sound-chart on the wall. We managed to have it on green in the morning, but a lot of the afternoon was definitely red. They know to be quiet when other people speak, and yet it creeps up and up almost instantly. I used the whole 'asking someone to repeat what was said' technique. With one boy in particular, that worked really well and he actually paid attention to one of the other pupils who was speaking.
    I have also started using the reward ladder on the wall.

    It still felt a little mad this afternoon though [yet this morning, they were great]. So, I still need to work on it. But, I guess progress is progress, no matter how small.



    Now I am going to get something to eat. Third day in a row that I've not eaten until after 5pm. I just don't seem to have the time. :/
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    (Original post by affinity89)
    Today was a bit better.

    I used the sound-chart on the wall. We managed to have it on green in the morning, but a lot of the afternoon was definitely red. They know to be quiet when other people speak, and yet it creeps up and up almost instantly. I used the whole 'asking someone to repeat what was said' technique. With one boy in particular, that worked really well and he actually paid attention to one of the other pupils who was speaking.
    I have also started using the reward ladder on the wall.

    It still felt a little mad this afternoon though [yet this morning, they were great]. So, I still need to work on it. But, I guess progress is progress, no matter how small.



    Now I am going to get something to eat. Third day in a row that I've not eaten until after 5pm. I just don't seem to have the time. :/
    I'm very glad you've had a better day. Remember, Rome wasn't built in a day and we're all still learning how to do it, right up to the day we retire.
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    (Original post by affinity89)
    Today was a bit better.

    I used the sound-chart on the wall. We managed to have it on green in the morning, but a lot of the afternoon was definitely red. They know to be quiet when other people speak, and yet it creeps up and up almost instantly. I used the whole 'asking someone to repeat what was said' technique. With one boy in particular, that worked really well and he actually paid attention to one of the other pupils who was speaking.
    I have also started using the reward ladder on the wall.

    It still felt a little mad this afternoon though [yet this morning, they were great]. So, I still need to work on it. But, I guess progress is progress, no matter how small.



    Now I am going to get something to eat. Third day in a row that I've not eaten until after 5pm. I just don't seem to have the time. :/
    DEFINITELY =D Enjoy your dinner!!
 
 
 
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