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      (Original post by Mr Chang)
      i just cant believe you took the time to travel to the event to learn this stuff, make notes, then take the time to type it all up on to the public domain just to decrease your own chances and take away any advantage gained from this event. i am shocked, you realise most people who are gonna take that advice would not even think twice about doing that? either you are genuinely retarded or just a really ****ing nice guy and i guess its the latter since you were there today lol but hey who needs a spring week wiv +1 reps!!!!!!!
      I'm a staunch believer in meritocracy. I don't believe that people should be ahead just because of what or who they know (I know that in this business a statement like that is just not applicable, yes). The only thing which should distinguish candidates is their intelligence, willpower, and prior accomplishments. Not information they're selectively withholding from others.

      sorry i'll get off my soapbox
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      (Original post by Expert #7451)
      I'm a staunch believer in meritocracy. I don't believe that people should be ahead just because of what or who they know (I know that in this business a statement like that is just not applicable, yes). The only thing which should distinguish candidates is their intelligence, willpower, and prior accomplishments. Not information they're selectively withholding from others.

      sorry i'll get off my soapbox
      This is so retarded. You do realize what you just said and what you just did are completely opposing?

      What about the proactivity+determination of people to travel from even up north (im pretty sure i met a guy from manchester who paid money to stay over night in a hotel so he could go) to attend this event in order to get an edge because they want it that bad? You just took that edge away and gave the info to every tom **** and harry who couldnt be ****ed to go, or didnt work hard enough to achieve the grades to go. anyway my bad, by your reply it was obviously the latter and not the former lol
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        (Original post by Mr Chang)
        This is so retarded. You do realize what you just said and what you just did are completely opposing?

        What about the proactivity+determination of people to travel from even up north (im pretty sure i met a guy from manchester who paid money to stay over night in a hotel so he could go) to attend this event in order to get an edge because they want it that bad? You just took that edge away and gave the info to every tom **** and harry who couldnt be ****ed to go, or didnt work hard enough to achieve the grades to go. anyway my bad, by your reply it was obviously the latter and not the former lol
        I'm one of those people from up North, actually.

        I don't see attending an event as being a real exertion of determination. It cost me a tonne to get the train tickets sorted, but ultimately I can't say I see going to BN as the herculean feat you're describing it is. I can see the general area you're coming from though, but I have to disagree.

        I doubt every guy who couldn't be bothered to go would be crawling through this thread, and I also doubt that the people who lacked the grades to attend BN (and hence wouldn't be at a target or semi-target uni and would have some rather mediocre CVs) would really benefit when they've got an inherent deficit.
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        (Original post by Mr Chang)
        This is so retarded. You do realize what you just said and what you just did are completely opposing?

        What about the proactivity+determination of people to travel from even up north (im pretty sure i met a guy from manchester who paid money to stay over night in a hotel so he could go) to attend this event in order to get an edge because they want it that bad? You just took that edge away and gave the info to every tom **** and harry who couldnt be ****ed to go, or didnt work hard enough to achieve the grades to go. anyway my bad, by your reply it was obviously the latter and not the former lol
        There's nothing in that post that I haven't read online already. Grow a pair - you'll not get anywhere with that attitude.
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        Thanks
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        (Original post by itssimplyme)
        BAML took on 80 last year.

        Just sayin'


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        Of over 3000 applicants


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        (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
        Of over 3000 applicants


        Posted from TSR Mobile
        Damn.
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        (Original post by Expert #7451)
        Spoiler:
        Show
        His talks are the most useful asset I've had so far for this business. I'm going to post what I took down (I attended his morning talk for the iBanking event plus all four of the afternoon sessions plus a fifteen minute group session with him).

        Treat this as gospel. I think if you ace all of these there's no way you'll walk away empty-handed. I've just wrote them based on classifications as to my messy notes. Treat each title as a broad umbrella.

        Gwyn on competency questions

        To be able to handle these, you need to have relevant experience. This means being involved in relevant clubs. Being involved is not enough; to encounter the problems and dilemmas which will give you lots of material to call back on, you need to get a position of responsibility. Don't just join your university finance club: get into a committee (the higher the better) level position. That way you get to make the contacts, network with the new people, and encounter the dilemmas that can provide those anecdotes and experience you can use. Take as many extra-curriculars as possible.

        For the questions themselves use CAR (Context, Action, Result). Think about relevant skills pertinent to each activity and dilemma and present your case during questions in a clear and quantitative way (instead of saying "Through my support of charity x I greatly improved my local community," say "I successfully raised £500 for charity x which was enough to buy five new beds at the children's wing of the hospital"). Don't be woolly. General investment acumen helps not just for competency questions, but also for having a grip on the business as a whole. Try to get ahold of that.

        Knowledge of employer

        When you're filling out that app form and going into that interview, ask if you know the following.

        • The firm's number of employees
        • The current CEO/key members of the board
        • The firm's revenues and profits
        • Individual fields it tops and doesn't do so well in
        • Company's history
        • Countries/localities it operates in
        • The company and the sector's strengths, weaknesses (internal), opportunities, and risks (external)
        • Political, economic, social, technological, and environmental changes/challenges to the company and the sector
        • Recent deals the bank partook in


        These can often be found through some basic research (Wiki, google searches, etc). Alongside that firms such as Deloitte and KPMG will publish reports which often highlight this sort of topic and provide very useful information on the more analytical points. Take time to look over the company's annual report; the executive summary is vital for getting a grip on the state of the business. The CEO/CFO's reports also provide vital insights.

        On the careers part of the website HR usually puts up seemingly inane talking heads and podcasts. These are not useless. They're vital resources with some important hidden information buried in them to do with corporate culture. Listen and read this stuff; if you go in knowing it and having the impression it gave you of the company, you'll stand out against all those who didn't pay attention.

        If you meet people and learn something from them, don't be afraid to reference them in your app or during interviews ("John Smith from X spoke to me and told me that unlike your competitors your culture places a high regard on the wellbeing of its analysts, etc."). These show you've taken the time to try to meet people. Don't just reference this; do analysis pertinent to yourself. Make this applicable to you. Don't just state "You're the best at fixed income;" tell them that their position in fixed income makes them attractive for these reasons applicable to you.

        Cashing in on spring week

        For your application to succeed, you simply need to get everything right. No spelling mistakes. No lapses in knowledge. Consistent evidence of your knowledge and interest in the firm and the sector. Ie, all the tips provided above and below.

        For the spring week to fast track you to a summer internship, don't be complacent. Whilst you're there take your time to go about the place and get to know both fellow students and staff. If you're doing desk work take the initiative to get up from your desk, go up to someone nearby who doesn't look like he's too caught up with work, and strike up a friendly conversation and get to know them. Ask them about themselves, find common ground. It's not just your manager that has a verdict. If people like you they can go to your manager and tell them this guy has got what they need. This is equally applicable to both the spring week and the summer internship. Make those connections and become a respected and well-liked guy, along with being a solid worker.

        As sad as it may be, solid interpersonal skills and the ability to integrate into the job are prized far above brilliant academic credentials. You need common interests.

        Assessment centres

        As hinted at above, try coming into these with the necessary knowledge. Ideas such as market cap, etc. At this point they start expecting you to know the fundamentals at least. You'll get assignments to give presentations on why you'd invest in certain stocks during the assessment centre, so concepts like this are very important.

        During tasks at the assessment centre, don't be an "alpha" who attempts to take charge of the entire procedure. Be collegiate. Begin by introducing yourself, and inviting everyone else to. Try to organise a timetable with the group. Speak with the group, and build on other people's ideas ("I like that idea. Let's take that further and...") in true collegiate fashion. Give everyone the chance to speak, and ask the opinion of the quieter and more thoughtful members of the group. Address the group when speaking, not just the person you think is your main competition. If you have an alpha who's trying to take over, calmly call them out ("Excuse me Barry, I think you should pause for a moment and ask the rest of the group their opinions...") or even ask the group to chip in if they really need reigning in ("Barry, I believe you're taking over too much. What does the group think?"). Don't let anyone dominate. The team activities are about finding an optimal solution, not an ideal one; don't turn perfectionist or obsessive. Accept whatever consensus arises.

        For these and the interviews, you also need to develop a sound knowledge on the business, the sector, and the wider world. So the company, the economy, and global geopolitical-economic issues.

        Aptitude tests

        Practice the tests before attempting them. Practice before online applications and also the assessment centre, where you may need to resit them in a controlled environment. Practice them as much as you can. On the online tests, make liberal use of your print screen key so you can take copies of the questions you have sat so far. As banks often use the same tests, you can reflect on this year's crop and potentially be able to correct mistakes or remember correct answers you made for future tests. Plus it's just free practice/revision material.

        Body language and social competence

        For those of us who aren't socially confident/competent, Gwyn claimed that some learned behaviours can help compensate for whatever deficits you have. Body language and facial expressions are key to communication. If you need to improve on these, research on the subjects of rapport and more specifically the technique of matching and mirroring. Never begin a sentance with an "Um" or an "Er;" pause for 5 seconds before speaking. Make hand movements, smile, and make eye contact (or stare at the tip of their nose or at the centre of their forehead).

        Academics

        Have a high 2:1 degree (66-70 at least) or else you're not going to be competitive. He recommended not doing a masters, as most iBanks aren't eager to defer employment if you take a one year master's after a 3-year course.

        Interviews

        Every response you make should be thought-out, and consist of 2-3 points at most to prevent you from rambling on and boring the interviewer. Make sure you're able to do good reasoning for any questions like "How many ice-creams did they sell in Blackpool yesterday?" or so on. Make sure you are ready for any competency questions. Don't repeat yourself or the question. For the traditional "weakness" question, speak about something that's relatively inane but a clear negative trait. Turn the statement into how you're taking steps to mitigate that. Be ready with some questions other than the dry and dull. Ask questions pertaining to how you'll be in the company; ask what you'll have done in a certain time period.

        I think that's the real meat of it.
        Great post. Thanks a lot!
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        (Original post by Expert #7451)
        His talks are the most useful asset I've had so far for this business. I'm going to post what I took down (I attended his morning talk for the iBanking event plus all four of the afternoon sessions plus a fifteen minute group session with him).

        Treat this as gospel. I think if you ace all of these there's no way you'll walk away empty-handed. I've just wrote them based on classifications as to my messy notes. Treat each title as a broad umbrella.

        Gwyn on competency questions

        To be able to handle these, you need to have relevant experience. This means being involved in relevant clubs. Being involved is not enough; to encounter the problems and dilemmas which will give you lots of material to call back on, you need to get a position of responsibility. Don't just join your university finance club: get into a committee (the higher the better) level position. That way you get to make the contacts, network with the new people, and encounter the dilemmas that can provide those anecdotes and experience you can use. Take as many extra-curriculars as possible.

        For the questions themselves use CAR (Context, Action, Result). Think about relevant skills pertinent to each activity and dilemma and present your case during questions in a clear and quantitative way (instead of saying "Through my support of charity x I greatly improved my local community," say "I successfully raised £500 for charity x which was enough to buy five new beds at the children's wing of the hospital"). Don't be woolly. General investment acumen helps not just for competency questions, but also for having a grip on the business as a whole. Try to get ahold of that.

        Knowledge of employer

        When you're filling out that app form and going into that interview, ask if you know the following.

        • The firm's number of employees
        • The current CEO/key members of the board
        • The firm's revenues and profits
        • Individual fields it tops and doesn't do so well in
        • Company's history
        • Countries/localities it operates in
        • The company and the sector's strengths, weaknesses (internal), opportunities, and risks (external)
        • Political, economic, social, technological, and environmental changes/challenges to the company and the sector
        • Recent deals the bank partook in


        These can often be found through some basic research (Wiki, google searches, etc). Alongside that firms such as Deloitte and KPMG will publish reports which often highlight this sort of topic and provide very useful information on the more analytical points. Take time to look over the company's annual report; the executive summary is vital for getting a grip on the state of the business. The CEO/CFO's reports also provide vital insights.

        On the careers part of the website HR usually puts up seemingly inane talking heads and podcasts. These are not useless. They're vital resources with some important hidden information buried in them to do with corporate culture. Listen and read this stuff; if you go in knowing it and having the impression it gave you of the company, you'll stand out against all those who didn't pay attention.

        If you meet people and learn something from them, don't be afraid to reference them in your app or during interviews ("John Smith from X spoke to me and told me that unlike your competitors your culture places a high regard on the wellbeing of its analysts, etc."). These show you've taken the time to try to meet people. Don't just reference this; do analysis pertinent to yourself. Make this applicable to you. Don't just state "You're the best at fixed income;" tell them that their position in fixed income makes them attractive for these reasons applicable to you.

        Cashing in on spring week

        For your application to succeed, you simply need to get everything right. No spelling mistakes. No lapses in knowledge. Consistent evidence of your knowledge and interest in the firm and the sector. Ie, all the tips provided above and below.

        For the spring week to fast track you to a summer internship, don't be complacent. Whilst you're there take your time to go about the place and get to know both fellow students and staff. If you're doing desk work take the initiative to get up from your desk, go up to someone nearby who doesn't look like he's too caught up with work, and strike up a friendly conversation and get to know them. Ask them about themselves, find common ground. It's not just your manager that has a verdict. If people like you they can go to your manager and tell them this guy has got what they need. This is equally applicable to both the spring week and the summer internship. Make those connections and become a respected and well-liked guy, along with being a solid worker.

        As sad as it may be, solid interpersonal skills and the ability to integrate into the job are prized far above brilliant academic credentials. You need common interests.

        Assessment centres

        As hinted at above, try coming into these with the necessary knowledge. Ideas such as market cap, etc. At this point they start expecting you to know the fundamentals at least. You'll get assignments to give presentations on why you'd invest in certain stocks during the assessment centre, so concepts like this are very important.

        During tasks at the assessment centre, don't be an "alpha" who attempts to take charge of the entire procedure. Be collegiate. Begin by introducing yourself, and inviting everyone else to. Try to organise a timetable with the group. Speak with the group, and build on other people's ideas ("I like that idea. Let's take that further and...") in true collegiate fashion. Give everyone the chance to speak, and ask the opinion of the quieter and more thoughtful members of the group. Address the group when speaking, not just the person you think is your main competition. If you have an alpha who's trying to take over, calmly call them out ("Excuse me Barry, I think you should pause for a moment and ask the rest of the group their opinions...") or even ask the group to chip in if they really need reigning in ("Barry, I believe you're taking over too much. What does the group think?"). Don't let anyone dominate. The team activities are about finding an optimal solution, not an ideal one; don't turn perfectionist or obsessive. Accept whatever consensus arises.

        For these and the interviews, you also need to develop a sound knowledge on the business, the sector, and the wider world. So the company, the economy, and global geopolitical-economic issues.

        Aptitude tests

        Practice the tests before attempting them. Practice before online applications and also the assessment centre, where you may need to resit them in a controlled environment. Practice them as much as you can. On the online tests, make liberal use of your print screen key so you can take copies of the questions you have sat so far. As banks often use the same tests, you can reflect on this year's crop and potentially be able to correct mistakes or remember correct answers you made for future tests. Plus it's just free practice/revision material.

        Body language and social competence

        For those of us who aren't socially confident/competent, Gwyn claimed that some learned behaviours can help compensate for whatever deficits you have. Body language and facial expressions are key to communication. If you need to improve on these, research on the subjects of rapport and more specifically the technique of matching and mirroring. Never begin a sentance with an "Um" or an "Er;" pause for 5 seconds before speaking. Make hand movements, smile, and make eye contact (or stare at the tip of their nose or at the centre of their forehead).

        Academics

        Have a high 2:1 degree (66-70 at least) or else you're not going to be competitive. He recommended not doing a masters, as most iBanks aren't eager to defer employment if you take a one year master's after a 3-year course.

        Interviews

        Every response you make should be thought-out, and consist of 2-3 points at most to prevent you from rambling on and boring the interviewer. Make sure you're able to do good reasoning for any questions like "How many ice-creams did they sell in Blackpool yesterday?" or so on. Make sure you are ready for any competency questions. Don't repeat yourself or the question. For the traditional "weakness" question, speak about something that's relatively inane but a clear negative trait. Turn the statement into how you're taking steps to mitigate that. Be ready with some questions other than the dry and dull. Ask questions pertaining to how you'll be in the company; ask what you'll have done in a certain time period.

        I think that's the real meat of it.
        This is absolutely brilliant!

        A great summary to what I learnt from the day!
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        DB and CS had between 20-25 places each for SW last year, with over 12000 apps, just a heads-up
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        (Original post by President M.E.)
        DB and CS had between 20-25 places each for SW last year, with over 12000 apps, just a heads-up
        fml there is no hope
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        (Original post by yl95)
        fml there is no hope
        BNPP took on 25 and only had 1,000 apps. It's less competitive the lower down you go, haha.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
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        (Original post by will2348)
        BNPP took on 25 and only had 1,000 apps. It's less competitive the lower down you go, haha.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        That's still mad competitive, I honestly didn't think we had it so bad for Spring Weeks
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        (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
        That's still mad competitive, I honestly didn't think we had it so bad for Spring Weeks
        Same.


        (Original post by will2348)
        BNPP took on 25 and only had 1,000 apps. It's less competitive the lower down you go, haha.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        Still, that's only 2.5% acceptance rate.
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        (Original post by President M.E.)
        DB and CS had between 20-25 places each for SW last year, with over 12000 apps, just a heads-up
        cs had at the least double that. Where did you get this info from? db sounds correct
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        (Original post by will2348)
        BNPP took on 25 and only had 1,000 apps. It's less competitive the lower down you go, haha.

        Posted from TSR Mobile
        jesus, that's horrible!

        any other career paths for Economics graduates?!
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        (Original post by President M.E.)
        DB and CS had between 20-25 places each for SW last year, with over 12000 apps, just a heads-up
        Sounds like easy sailing to me
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        (Original post by President M.E.)
        DB and CS had between 20-25 places each for SW last year, with over 12000 apps, just a heads-up
        Is that really 12,000 or did you mean 1,200?!
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        (Original post by Refrigerator)
        Is that really 12,000 or did you mean 1,200?!
        It really wouldn't surprise me if it was 12,000 haha.
       
       
       
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