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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    Is doncaster a bad hospital? Or is it just the distance?
    Distance. Have to take a train there every morning and to be there before 8:45am...
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    OSCE was actually quite fun in the end No more exams of any kind until June!


    By the way... is there a special technique to percussing.. or do you basically just need to practise? We had a chest examination as one of the stations and I couldn't get ANY sound when I was percussing the "patient"'s back!
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Seems like you got the better deal!
    Yeah, it was actually really fun just chatting to the patients! They were a very mixed bag which was interesting
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    (Original post by xconfetti)
    OSCE was actually quite fun in the end No more exams of any kind until June!


    By the way... is there a special technique to percussing.. or do you basically just need to practise? We had a chest examination as one of the stations and I couldn't get ANY sound when I was percussing the "patient"'s back!
    There is a technique to getting a good noise. You can practice pretty well on yourself.
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    (Original post by xconfetti)
    OSCE was actually quite fun in the end No more exams of any kind until June!


    By the way... is there a special technique to percussing.. or do you basically just need to practise? We had a chest examination as one of the stations and I couldn't get ANY sound when I was percussing the "patient"'s back!
    If you are right handed:

    • Press with your left middle finger hard and flat against the surface. Emphasis on hard.
    • With the fingertip pad of your right middle finger, tap on the space between your PIP and DIP of the left middle finger.
    • The action needs to come from the wrist, not the elbow. Practise on yourself to get an idea of the amount of strength you need to use


    If your finger isn't completely flat, you will just dull the sound.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Glad to see you had a good first firm. Sounds like you really got involved and learnt a lot I think the crucial bit is what I bolded, which is obviously related to decreased student numbers.
    Absolutely. I learned SO much more of the useful real being-a-doctor stuff on my DGH placements than in Addenbrooke's. I was able to be the first person on the team to see medical/surgical referrals in A&E, get them checked out by an SHO and present them on the PTWR, cannulate, take bloods, write in the notes on ward rounds etc. Admittedly I didn't do ABGs until my final year - we didn't have the clinical skills session until halfway through 5th year - and I had very few successful ones under my belt before graduating. I'd also never catheterised a female, and even now find them more worrying than male ones.

    On most of my DGH placements I got involved as part of the team, the consultant knew my name and would ask me questions and I was able to help out with lots of jobs. A lot of it is scut work like writing out blood forms or filling in results flowcharts, but if you do that for them then they're more likely to teach. It would be very easy not to do any of this though, and just show up occasionally because you were "in teaching" the rest of the time. And in Addies, you were in teaching a lot, and there were more students around, which meant that you never got to be so involved.

    I don't think you can force doctors to teach students or to act as mentors, but if there was some kind of incentive for the juniors, I bet loads of them would jump at it.
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    (Original post by SabreT)
    The muscles of the larynx make me want to tear my head off.
    Wait till you get to the upper and lover limb.


    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Yeah, I'm starting to feel pretty crap at the moment as well. Don't get me wrong I had lack of motivation last year but this year I struggle to find a reason to get out of bed unless my girlfriend is coming over. Not even video games keep me entertained for very long which is ****ed up.

    SSC week with Med Ed next though, hopefully it'll perk up a bit. I'm 99% sure we haven't covered hypothermia, I don't even see where that would fit into the wierd blocks of Metabolism, CR, Met, Loco and B&B. Maybe CR? It definetly wasn't in CR though, nor met.
    Mate, I literally had this same cba attitude at this point in second year - and it stayed there until we started loco. I remember posting about it on here at this point last year. B&B2 in year 2 was really tough to get your head around. HD2 was really badly taught too last year (and as usual they left the complicated bits to the last week) so the B&B/HD ICA we had in March last year pretty much combined the toughest module with the most unorganised module. Hopefully, things would have changed this year for HD (that is if they acted on our feedback from last year). I certainly hope they have. It's a tough period to get through but with that extra perseverance, you should be ok. I found that speaking to older year medics helped a lot with this.

    Good Luck with the Med Ed SSC. I was asked to help out with one of the pbls, but I have my own project to be getting on with and loads of other commitments. I hope they're teaching you the nice bits of the course and not the painfully boring bits. Let me know how it goes - I'm genuinely interested to see how this turns out.
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Wait till you get to the upper and lover limb.
    We've finished the upper and lower limb
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    (Original post by SabreT)
    We've finished the upper and lower limb
    Oh. Then this really should be much easier. Or maybe I'm just weird...

    EDIT: Actually, don't answer that! :p:
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    (Original post by SabreT)
    We've finished the upper and lower limb
    I hate the upper limb with a passion (especially the hand - so many ligaments and muscles). Lower limb has one of the easiest anatomy to learn. Also quite like the larynx, are you also learning Zenker's diverticulum etc? Add pathology in rather than just learning anatomy on its own - the clinical significance makes it much more memorable.

    Also do you have to keep a logbook of time in theatre? Some people do in my year but do we have to - is there any significance of keeping one?

    And after watching the Junior Doctors thing - how many people would tell a patient they've never inserted a chest drain and its their second day on the job. (I would feel comfortable informing a patient I have never done it before if they asked, but then reassure them that I'd be guided by a registrar etc but not so sure about the latter part about it being my second day...).
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Oh. Then this really should be much easier. Or maybe I'm just weird...

    EDIT: Actually, don't answer that! :p:
    You're definitely not weird.

    Limbs are horrendous to learn and basically impossible to retain. I have friends that memorised it all. A month later they could probably remember about four muscles.

    I just did compartments and a few important muscles/landmarks.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    And after watching the Junior Doctors thing - how many people would tell a patient they've never inserted a chest drain and its their second day on the job. (I would feel comfortable informing a patient I have never done it before if they asked, but then reassure them that I'd be guided by a registrar etc but not so sure about the latter part about it being my second day...).
    I have a feeling that was made worse by the fact the camera crew was following him around, the patient was a chronic one who probably knew wussup.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    I hate the upper limb with a passion (especially the hand - so many ligaments and muscles). Lower limb has one of the easiest anatomy to learn. Also quite like the larynx, are you also learning Zenker's diverticulum etc? Add pathology in rather than just learning anatomy on its own - the clinical significance makes it much more memorable.
    The limbs aren't easy, but the larynx is so much harder with all the similar sounding muscles. Yeah Zenker's diverticulum came up in our lecture so I guess we have to learn it -_-

    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Also do you have to keep a logbook of time in theatre? Some people do in my year but do we have to - is there any significance of keeping one?
    Is this addressed to me? Theatre? I'm in my second term of first year! I won't be seeing the theatre for a long time yet, especially not at Cambridge.
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    (Original post by SabreT)
    The limbs aren't easy, but the larynx is so much harder with all the similar sounding muscles. Yeah Zenker's diverticulum came up in our lecture so I guess we have to learn it -_-
    Wait til you do head and neck then - trochlear nerve (4th cranial nerve), trochlea of humerus... So many similar names!

    (Original post by SabreT)
    Is this addressed to me? Theatre? I'm in my second term of first year! I won't be seeing the theatre for a long time yet, especially not at Cambridge.
    Addressed to everyone really.
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    anatomy, zzzzz. always gun for the minimum for now
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    anatomy, zzzzz. always gun for the minimum for now
    And that is how people feel about metabolism
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    (Original post by Vulpes)
    AHA! Post above me reminded me. Has anyone used this before: http://www.biodigitalhuman.com/

    You may have to enable WebGL in Google Chrome to get it to work. (Type about:flags in the address bar for that)
    I used that for a while, it's a nice program but not detailed enough. I like to be able to see detailed osteology features for revising muscle attachments and such which this doesn't have.

    If you have an iPod touch, iPhone or iPad however there are countless brilliant apps for revising anatomy. I must've spent a small fortune on them for my anatomy exam in a few months.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    If you are right handed:

    • Press with your left middle finger hard and flat against the surface. Emphasis on hard.
    • With the fingertip pad of your right middle finger, tap on the space between your PIP and DIP of the left middle finger.
    • The action needs to come from the wrist, not the elbow. Practise on yourself to get an idea of the amount of strength you need to use


    If your finger isn't completely flat, you will just dull the sound.
    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    There is a technique to getting a good noise. You can practice pretty well on yourself.
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Also do you have to keep a logbook of time in theatre? Some people do in my year but do we have to - is there any significance of keeping one?.
    I do. Not time in theatre per se but operations I observed or scrubbed in, with a note of what I did if anything - reduced new hip, sutured, etc. I think it's necessary for surgical specialty interviews, but I started it cos I have a crap memory and wanted to keep a record of what I'd seen/done.
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    Any tips for learning the brachial plexus?
 
 
 
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