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turgon
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#901
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#901
We have a lecturer who gives breaks halfway as well (in a 1 hour lecture). He also gives out chocolates to people who ask relevant questions.
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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#902
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#902
(Original post by Swayum)
How long is one lecture?
One hour per lecture - but we have two back to back in the same hall (hence no break time in between) so all those who do straight mathematics are there for two hours so it is understandable that a break halfway through the second elcture would make sense.

How long are your lectures?
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Swayum
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#903
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#903
(Original post by DeanK22)
One hour per lecture - but we have two back to back in the same hall (hence no break time in between) so all those who do straight mathematics are there for two hours so it is understandable that a break halfway through the second elcture would make sense.

How long are your lectures?
All my ones are 1 hour, but other subjects do have 2 hour ones. On one day we do have 2 lectures back to back, but we don't get any breaks or chocolates!!! Although there are around 700 people in 3 out of 4 of my lectures, so it's not really possible for the lecturer to take questions and/or to give chocolate :p:
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silent ninja
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#904
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#904
(Original post by turgon)
Foundations - My least favourite core module at the minute. Contains stuff on numbers and polynomials (divisibility, HCF, LCM etc) which is seriously boring the crap out of me at the moment, and touches on set theory, group theory, modulo arithmetic, counting (the latter 3 we have yet to cover).
God i hate this module, worst module in the first year. It was also my highest mark, explain that :rolleyes: The tests every two weeks are a pain and the problem sheets are not easy. Then the topics jump about and seemingly have no connection to one another. Wait until you start 'Counting' -- from there it gets more difficult but interesting too, and weirdly enough that section onward is actually about the same size as everything you've covered up to that point (ie its large and they cram it).
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Mathletics
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#905
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#905
(Original post by turgon)
My Vectors lecturer invited a girl to accompany him into his office (so she could get a copy of this weeks assignment) in front of the whole year.
My personal tutor :cool: jealous?
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turgon
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#906
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#906
Slightly. He seems helpful enough in lectures.
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Mathletics
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#907
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#907
(Original post by turgon)
Slightly. He seems helpful enough in lectures.
He's a nice enough person, but his tutorials are pretty useless. Do you really rate him? I honestly think that if I hadn't done FP3 I'd struggle to know what's going on.

Dave Wood is our best lecturer IMO.
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around
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#908
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#908
Our courses:

Numbers and Sets
One of the pure lectures. We do stuff like basic set theory, integers, divisibility and counting. Best lecturer (I think) and he even supervises us

Groups
Fairly explanatory. Lecturer is oh so bad. I would genuinely enjoy this if it weren't for him.

Vectors and Matrices
Linear algebra by a different name, but it's an applied course so we don't really care so much about rigour. Lecturer is ******* insane.

Differential Equations
Self-explanatory. So far a lot of it has been revision of A-level stuff, but there's a much more synthetic view of everything (solution vectors, phase space etc etc). It is very applied though, there's a lot of 'ignore these terms they all cancel it anyway'
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turgon
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#909
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#909
(Original post by Mathletics)
He's a nice enough person, but his tutorials are pretty useless. Do you really rate him? I honestly think that if I hadn't done FP3 I'd struggle to know what's going on.

Dave Wood is our best lecturer IMO.
Dave Wood is the best one. Van Strein would probably come 2nd IMO, but I kinda get what you mean about him teaching something we've already covered.

I've just remembered Policott is a good lecturer, but he goes over what we've already done, rendering his lectures useless.

My supervisor sucks. He can barely speak proper english. But apparently he's been supervising for years....
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Glutamic Acid
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#910
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#910
I am going to attempt to descibre my first few weeks of doing maths (yeah, maths ) at Cambridge in no less than 100 blacks.

You may take issues with my description, and I'll try to address the concerns before you post them, so I won't have to reply (you stupid ******). ISSUE: you disagree with my description. RESOLUTION: you are incorrect. ISSUE: you believe my description is not based upon facts or tangible evidence slash experience. RESOLUTION: you can prove anything with facts. ISSUE: you're just reposting old quotes which are held nostalgically in your head. RESOLUTION: correct

But, ok, I'll do the courses in alphabetical order:

Groups: The word on the street is that there is a gulf in affinity for "groups", and "groups lectures". Consider a spherical Saxl, but only bearded and so infinitely more endearing - no one out of the 2^8 \pm \epsilon students attending lectures would refuse a hug from him. As sad as it is (very sad, it is) Saxl is most likely coming towards the end of his illustrious career, but first I would like to decorate his life: born in Germany in some year, he grew up in a very poor German school (this was not long after World War I) and due to exceptional brilliance in mathematics managed to secure a place at the prestigious University of Germany. After graduating with a first in Maths with Hitler Studies, he went into the GAF (German Air Force). He aspired to become the greatest ever German pilot, and succeeded in doing so and bombed between 1000 and 20,000,000 Hungarian people during World War II. Despite this, he was fired from the GAF for reasons unknown. After moving to France, he made a living from racing tanks through the streets of Ou Oui La Oui (an "extinct" French village) until there was some trouble in the neighbourhood, he got in one little fight and his mom got scored, but he didn't move to Bel Air, instead he moved to London. Now, details are sketchy, but there is sufficient evidence to believe that he became a prolific serial killer in various districts of London, and after a lull of 18 months between a kill took up a post in Cambridge... After taking up his post, the killings ceased, until only just over a week ago a paper aeroplane was thrown in a lecture, reminded Saxl of his being fired from the GAF, and reigniting his killing fantasies.

Groups are inherently sexual creatures. And I enjoy learning about groups, to the detriment of courses in which I need to work harder (apparently one is required to work at university?!)

Numbers and Sets: there is no doubt a gulf (think of a synonym for this quick, GA!, for you'll bore your intrepid followers) between the difficulty of numbers & sets lectures and the corrrrrrrresponding example *****. Oooh, oooh, let's find a bijection. Let me guess, a bijection is a type of injection but for bisexual people. LOLOLOL :rofl: :rofl2: :roflharris: Whereas problems involving combinatorics () and the pigeonhole principle () and even number theory () are a lot of fun. But functions, injections, surjections and bijections? Just GTFO. An early criticism of Thomason was that he was, perhaps, slow in covering content. But I find it fairly undeniable that he is clear, and there's underlying wit in his lectures.

Differential Equations: Oh, Grae Worster, where art thou? I adore you, and may find it fitting to purchase a teddy bear for you at the end of this lecture course. (Maybe I will even present it to you during a lecture if my sanity has finally run out?). I enjoy differential equations immensely, and I am sure to accept that it is the course rather than the 40p tea which revives me from the soporific dozing which occurs during vectors and matrices. My heart leaps when DEs stray too much on the applied side, but he always pulls it back. Phase space evolves sounds borderline Sci-fi, but the Hospital rule (which is: if you catch your **** in your zipper then go to the hospital if ****/zipper ~ 0/0 or infinity/infinity) melts my cordate organ (but not chordate organ; that would be disgusting). The Wronskian, invented by Viktor Krum who also invented the Wronski Feint, is both fascinating and seems to have more to give us. Mmm, the Heaviside step function and the Dirac (delta?) function awaits. I am hungry.

VECTORS AND MATRICES: First, I must make it crystal clear that what I say about vectors and matrices should be considered distinct from Cowley, whom I respect and acknowledge that with any other lecturer I would be asleep within 5 minutes of the lecture beginning, as opposed to 45 minutes. His wisdom of words are relevant and perspicacious - his humour oscillates from witty to bizarre (and which do I prefer?). Now, vectors can be considered as a row of n numbers. Numbers are boring, right? So n numbers is boring^n. Now, consider matrices as a grid of n numbers multiplied by n numbers: boring^(n^2). God it makes me want to gauge my eyes out with a pencil/pen/sharpener/eraser. Transposes are zzzzzzzzz. Determinants are zzzz (notice fewer z's!). Hermitian matrices are zzzzzzzz. The summation convention is :curious:. Proving shizzle about vector spaces from vector space axioms is like killing yourself, only worse. And geometric interpretations are no better than enemata. I cannot wait for 2nd year linear algebra (should I survive)

So, yes, that's my view. Criticize it (please don't). Send me a PM (please do). And my sentiment to overcall everything is: help. Please.
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reems23
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#911
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#911
(Original post by Glutamic Acid)
I am going to attempt to descibre my first few weeks of doing maths (yeah, maths ) at Cambridge in no less than 100 blacks.

You may take issues with my description, and I'll try to address the concerns before you post them, so I won't have to reply (you stupid ******). ISSUE: you disagree with my description. RESOLUTION: you are incorrect. ISSUE: you believe my description is not based upon facts or tangible evidence slash experience. RESOLUTION: you can prove anything with facts. ISSUE: you're just reposting old quotes which are held nostalgically in your head. RESOLUTION: correct

But, ok, I'll do the courses in alphabetical order:

Groups: The word on the street is that there is a gulf in affinity for "groups", and "groups lectures". Consider a spherical Saxl, but only bearded and so infinitely more endearing - no one out of the 2^8 \pm \epsilon students attending lectures would refuse a hug from him. As sad as it is (very sad, it is) Saxl is most likely coming towards the end of his illustrious career, but first I would like to decorate his life: born in Germany in some year, he grew up in a very poor German school (this was not long after World War I) and due to exceptional brilliance in mathematics managed to secure a place at the prestigious University of Germany. After graduating with a first in Maths with Hitler Studies, he went into the GAF (German Air Force). He aspired to become the greatest ever German pilot, and succeeded in doing so and bombed between 1000 and 20,000,000 Hungarian people during World War II. Despite this, he was fired from the GAF for reasons unknown. After moving to France, he made a living from racing tanks through the streets of Ou Oui La Oui (an "extinct" French village) until there was some trouble in the neighbourhood, he got in one little fight and his mom got scored, but he didn't move to Bel Air, instead he moved to London. Now, details are sketchy, but there is sufficient evidence to believe that he became a prolific serial killer in various districts of London, and after a lull of 18 months between a kill took up a post in Cambridge... After taking up his post, the killings ceased, until only just over a week ago a paper aeroplane was thrown in a lecture, reminded Saxl of his being fired from the GAF, and reigniting his killing fantasies.

Groups are inherently sexual creatures. And I enjoy learning about groups, to the detriment of courses in which I need to work harder (apparently one is required to work at university?!)

Numbers and Sets: there is no doubt a gulf (think of a synonym for this quick, GA!, for you'll bore your intrepid followers) between the difficulty of numbers & sets lectures and the corrrrrrrresponding example *****. Oooh, oooh, let's find a bijection. Let me guess, a bijection is a type of injection but for bisexual people. LOLOLOL :rofl: :rofl2: :roflharris: Whereas problems involving combinatorics () and the pigeonhole principle () and even number theory () are a lot of fun. But functions, injections, surjections and bijections? Just GTFO. An early criticism of Thomason was that he was, perhaps, slow in covering content. But I find it fairly undeniable that he is clear, and there's underlying wit in his lectures.

Differential Equations: Oh, Grae Worster, where art thou? I adore you, and may find it fitting to purchase a teddy bear for you at the end of this lecture course. (Maybe I will even present it to you during a lecture if my sanity has finally run out?). I enjoy differential equations immensely, and I am sure to accept that it is the course rather than the 40p tea which revives me from the soporific dozing which occurs during vectors and matrices. My heart leaps when DEs stray too much on the applied side, but he always pulls it back. Phase space evolves sounds borderline Sci-fi, but the Hospital rule (which is: if you catch your **** in your zipper then go to the hospital if ****/zipper ~ 0/0 or infinity/infinity) melts my cordate organ (but not chordate organ; that would be disgusting). The Wronskian, invented by Viktor Krum who also invented the Wronski Feint, is both fascinating and seems to have more to give us. Mmm, the Heaviside step function and the Dirac (delta?) function awaits. I am hungry.

VECTORS AND MATRICES: First, I must make it crystal clear that what I say about vectors and matrices should be considered distinct from Cowley, whom I respect and acknowledge that with any other lecturer I would be asleep within 5 minutes of the lecture beginning, as opposed to 45 minutes. His wisdom of words are relevant and perspicacious - his humour oscillates from witty to bizarre (and which do I prefer?). Now, vectors can be considered as a row of n numbers. Numbers are boring, right? So n numbers is boring^n. Now, consider matrices as a grid of n numbers multiplied by n numbers: boring^(n^2). God it makes me want to gauge my eyes out with a pencil/pen/sharpener/eraser. Transposes are zzzzzzzzz. Determinants are zzzz (notice fewer z's!). Hermitian matrices are zzzzzzzz. The summation convention is :curious:. Proving shizzle about vector spaces from vector space axioms is like killing yourself, only worse. And geometric interpretations are no better than enemata. I cannot wait for 2nd year linear algebra (should I survive)

So, yes, that's my view. Criticize it (please don't). Send me a PM (please do). And my sentiment to overcall everything is: help. Please.
I am yours to manipulate as you wish.
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Glutamic Acid
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#912
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#912
(Original post by reems23)
I am yours to manipulate as you wish.
I don't wish to manipulate you. Run and be free! Please.
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Swayum
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#913
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#913
I met two people today who've done well in STEP (one got S, S II & III the other 1, S I & II) - they both turned down their Cambridge maths offers. It's suddenly awakened the competitive nature in me.
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harr
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#914
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#914
(Original post by around)
Vectors and Matrices
Linear algebra by a different name, but it's an applied course so we don't really care so much about rigour. Lecturer is ******* insane.
It's probably worth noting that the course called Linear Algebra is quite different. The lectures have similar proofs to V+M (along with many more), but the example sheets have a more analysis-y feel.
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sonofdot
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#915
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#915
(Original post by Glutamic Acid)
...
Saxl's Czechoslovakian. Get your ******* facts right :p:
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assmaster
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#916
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#916
This thread needs more spam
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Edenr
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#917
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#917
Algebraic Geometry is so hard
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Hopping Mad Kangaroo
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#918
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#918
(Original post by Edenr)
Algebraic Geometry is so hard
Anything Matt Kerr teaches is hard - he doubles the course length in terms of material.
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MrShifty
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#919
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#919
(Original post by Edenr)
Algebraic Geometry is so hard
Ack! Algebraic Geometry's always struck me as one of those subjects people either really hate, or, if they have some kind of mental condition, really love.

I'm on my third attempt at mustering up enough enthusiasm to get a grip on varieties.
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Edenr
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#920
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#920
(Original post by MrShifty)
Ack! Algebraic Geometry's always struck me as one of those subjects people either really hate, or, if they have some kind of mental condition, really love.

I'm on my third attempt at mustering up enough enthusiasm to get a grip on varieties.
You see, the thing is, I really want to love it. It's interesting material, but it's just so difficult to get an initial grip on what all the notation means and how the different objects interact and behave.
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