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    (Original post by SMed)
    I don't think you succeeded in explaining to her what PubMed is. It is very likely she was so thick it is impossible to explain to her.
    She's still going. Essentially her entire argument and thought process can be summarised in this helpful video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqGc6oeIQ5Y
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    (Original post by Elles)
    If you do A&E in a 'diverse' area you'll get a fascinating insight into somatization syndromes from around the world...

    'All over body pain off legs' (normally accompanied by a worried son) is a classic.
    It is less fascinating when you're the one who needs to get them out of the hospital because you know that admission is genuinely not the answer or you've conceded defeat but chances of the medics/psych accepting are vanishing (but not impossible!) though.
    Even in the countryside we get a fair bit! Lots of 'unable to move my legs', 'can't feel my left arm', 'tingling in my feet', 'I'm having a stroke' kind of stuff.

    It's really problematic because unless you can convince them early that there's nothing serious going on, they can fester on a ward for ages. The difficult bit is being brave enough to tell them that they're fine before you start down the line of investigations because once you start to look for pathology there's a lot of very time consuming imaging, biochemistry and referral that needs to be done to 'rule out' the weird and wonderful neurologies.
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    I think the weirdest thing I've seen was a near middle-aged woman (brought to A&E by her sister) who had apparently regressed to a child-like state. She just sat there drawing with crayons and doing baby talk, but was otherwise lucid and healthy. Creepy as ****.

    Don't think it was legit.
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    First lot of inter professional education sessions today. Interesting.......
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I think the weirdest thing I've seen was a near middle-aged woman (brought to A&E by her sister) who had apparently regressed to a child-like state. She just sat there drawing with crayons and doing baby talk, but was otherwise lucid and healthy. Creepy as ****.

    Don't think it was legit.
    pretty impressive
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    (Original post by rumandraisin)
    First lot of inter professional education sessions today. Interesting.......
    It just gets better and better.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    x
    PRSOM. I just love your sarcasm
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    Today.
    Before a procedure.
    Consultant: So have you spoken to the patient beforehand?
    Me: No
    C: Why not? Its imperative.
    Me: Because she doesn't speak english.....
    C: Oh.
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    (Original post by Phryx)
    Today.
    Before a procedure.
    Consultant: So have you spoken to the patient beforehand?
    Me: No
    C: Why not? Its imperative.
    Me: Because she doesn't speak english.....
    C: Oh.
    My consultant has only asked me to present a patient. On my first day. On the ward round where before I was in handover.
    I want to know by what magical ability I was supposed to know the patient...
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    My consultant has only asked me to present a patient. On my first day. On the ward round where before I was in handover.
    I want to know by what magical ability I was supposed to know the patient...
    I'm now an acute medical house*****, this is what I do constantly for four hours a day, every day, every week for six months. My l33t emergency medicine and putting-people-to-sleep skillz are being used to speed read some on-call housie's clerking, parrot it off to a boss and then be embarrassed when they haven't recorded the serum rhubarb in the appropriate place in the notes and they haven't already ordered a magnetic resonance mesenteric angiogram.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I'm now an acute medical house*****, this is what I do constantly for four hours a day, every day, every week for six months.
    Lol.
    I still felt having never had a chance to meet the patient it was a little unfair
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Lol.
    I still felt having never had a chance to meet the patient it was a little unfair
    I never meet my patients until the W/R and rarely see them again.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I never meet my patients until the W/R and rarely see them again.
    Touche
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    This job perfectly encapsulates everything I hate about medicine and every reason I can think of not to be a medic.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I'm now an acute medical house*****, this is what I do constantly for four hours a day, every day, every week for six months. My l33t emergency medicine and putting-people-to-sleep skillz are being used to speed read some on-call housie's clerking, parrot it off to a boss and then be embarrassed when they haven't recorded the serum rhubarb in the appropriate place in the notes and they haven't already ordered a magnetic resonance mesenteric angiogram.
    Lol!
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    Am I supposed to know a lot of stuff by the end of my first two years? I know it sounds stupid because I still have three years left but even before starting clinical there are some diseases we literally have never been taught about.

    For example, an old school friend got diagnosed with Crohns. Granted, I know the gist of it from passing anecdotes such as examples when the immune system goes wrong but not the mechanism nor treatment. We've never been officially taught about this disease, have I been missing large chunks or is this normal? Technically I've finished all of my pre-clincial metabolism teaching so I'll never learn about Crohns in a pre-clinical setting, this just strikes me as odd. While I could get the ideas of the treatment from wikipedia/emedicine based on background knowledge of immunology and drugs I still find it disconcerting. Had this old friend never got diagnosed I would have entered a ward having never really learnt about it ready to be arse raped by a consultant.

    This isn't the only disease either, obviously. I'm just using it as an example. I understand we can't be taught every condition in the entire world but from what I gather Crohns/UC aren't exactly rare.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Am I supposed to know a lot of stuff by the end of my first two years? I know it sounds stupid because I still have three years left but even before starting clinical there are some diseases we literally have never been taught about.

    For example, an old school friend got diagnosed with Crohns. Granted, I know the gist of it from passing anecdotes such as examples when the immune system goes wrong but not the mechanism nor treatment. We've never been officially taught about this disease, have I been missing large chunks or is this normal? Technically I've finished all of my pre-clincial metabolism teaching so I'll never learn about Crohns in a pre-clinical setting, this just strikes me as odd. While I could get the ideas of the treatment from wikipedia/emedicine based on background knowledge of immunology and drugs I still find it disconcerting. Had this old friend never got diagnosed I would have entered a ward having never really learnt about it ready to be arse raped by a consultant.

    This isn't the only disease either, obviously. I'm just using it as an example. I understand we can't be taught every condition in the entire world but from what I gather Crohns/UC aren't exactly rare.
    You'll pick this stuff up in your clinical years (reading, talking with doctors, etc.).

    Mind, if you find a good mechanism for how the immune system goes wrong in Crohn's, let me know. Oh, and collect your global recognition for it too.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    You'll pick this stuff up in your clinical years (reading, talking with doctors, etc.).

    Mind, if you find a good mechanism for how the immune system goes wrong in Crohn's, let me know. Oh, and collect your global recognition for it too.
    You know what I mean, you're a lot more cynical these days than you used to be when I was applying
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    I had about 4 lectures on UC/crohns...
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I had about 4 lectures on UC/crohns...
    In third year or in the past? We've never had any formal teaching on either and I can't see any block where it would fit with what's left in this year (Loco/B&B).
 
 
 
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