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    I haven't had any lectures specifically on IBDs as such, but it has been taught to us from various aspects throughout our GI module last semester.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    You know what I mean, you're a lot more cynical these days than you used to be when I was applying
    To be fair, I don't think we got much of a lecture on IBD. We did have a PBL on it though.


    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I had about 4 lectures on UC/crohns...
    I'm curious about other courses of late.

    How many lectures, roughly, for instance, did you get on the immune system?
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    In third year or in the past? We've never had any formal teaching on either and I can't see any block where it would fit with what's left in this year (Loco/B&B).
    What Kinkerz said. I remember getting tutorials on it in hospital but at the end of the day, you will still have to do some of your own reading (remember what I said to you about reading OHCM even as a preclinical student?) You have enough knowledge now to understand most of the stuff now so it is all about fleshing out your knowledge now and in third year.


    As for differentiation, simple rules would be:

    -If it extends outside the colon (ileocecal valve to rectum) it is Crohn's.
    If you see granuloma's or crypt abscess on histology, then it is Crohn's.
    -If you have bloody diarrhoea, it is UC.

    Treatment is immunosuppression and antiinflammatories. Total colectomy for UC is curative, doesn't help for Crohn's.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    My consultant has only asked me to present a patient. On my first day. On the ward round where before I was in handover.
    I want to know by what magical ability I was supposed to know the patient...
    This literally happened to one of my friends on her first day of her firm this term. I laughed when she told me, but I only give it time before it is my turn in her position. :s

    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Am I supposed to know a lot of stuff by the end of my first two years? I know it sounds stupid because I still have three years left but even before starting clinical there are some diseases we literally have never been taught about.

    For example, an old school friend got diagnosed with Crohns. Granted, I know the gist of it from passing anecdotes such as examples when the immune system goes wrong but not the mechanism nor treatment. We've never been officially taught about this disease, have I been missing large chunks or is this normal? Technically I've finished all of my pre-clincial metabolism teaching so I'll never learn about Crohns in a pre-clinical setting, this just strikes me as odd. While I could get the ideas of the treatment from wikipedia/emedicine based on background knowledge of immunology and drugs I still find it disconcerting. Had this old friend never got diagnosed I would have entered a ward having never really learnt about it ready to be arse raped by a consultant.

    This isn't the only disease either, obviously. I'm just using it as an example. I understand we can't be taught every condition in the entire world but from what I gather Crohns/UC aren't exactly rare.
    I know what you mean - some of the stuff does seem glossed over and I suppose you do have to do your own reading. Its almost impossible to teach everything there is to know about medicine (especially if they have all the random IPE, Comm Skills, MedSoc, SSC posters etc. to fit in the timetable). That said, Crohns really should have been taught to you at some point. I'm guessing it was probably mentioned in FunMed when you did your immunology. It was for us and that's when I remember learning it (and it was mentioned again in second year in Met 2 - can't remember the name of the lecture but I remember what the slides looked like). Then again, you guys had the new FunMed with the new lecturers so I don't know what was taught, but like Kinkers said, you'll pick up on the missing bits in the later years - that's the idea with the spiral curriculum. I know the 3rd years had a couple of lectures on IBD and Crohns etc. this year because I remember reading a friends handout before I went in to run my year 1 PBL session which was on IBD.
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn360trGChY

    This has probably been posted before, but provided 2 minutes of quality entertainment tonight!
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    We were taught it in 2 years GI. Had a tutorial on Crohns/UC last week while on surgery firm. Saw a probable diagnosis of crohns yesterday in endoscopy suite.
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    I literally had no idea what UC/Crohn's were till 1st year clinics.... don't sweat it
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    (Original post by xconfetti)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn360trGChY

    This has probably been posted before, but provided 2 minutes of quality entertainment tonight!
    I lol'd. And diabetes just reminded me of this:

    Spoiler:
    Show


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    6 hours in an urgent referral eye clinic, full of non-urgent referrals and only supposed to last 2 hours. That was a fun morning.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Lol!
    My God! I hate my job!
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    6 hours in an urgent referral eye clinic, full of non-urgent referrals and only supposed to last 2 hours. That was a fun morning.
    Sucks dude
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Sucks dude
    Didn't take long for me to realise it wasn't the specialty for me. Although I could have decided that before medical school.
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    I really liked opthalmology week. Really well taught and interesting.
    Some interesting cases like a lady who we newly diagnosed with Wet AMD who didn't have a clue she had it.

    Onto neurology now, and wishing I'd been a bit more like some of the keenos on here and actually learnt neuroanatomy in 2nd year >_<
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    (Original post by Renal)
    My God! I hate my job!
    Please elaborate. We will be you soon. We need to know what to expect.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Please elaborate. We will be you soon. We need to know what to expect.
    I'm looking forward to graduating, but not particularly looking forward to the job of a house officer. The downsides I can see from my shadowing:

    1.) It isn't really a training job. One hour a week of formal teaching + little independent decision making = service job.
    2.) Often huge numbers of patients (last HO had 40, over 3 consultants with no SHO and no Reg's available) with little senior support.
    3.) An enormous amount of essentially clerical or technical work to be done that is not useful in improving your medical knowledge (updating lists, booking scans, chasing results, doing cannulas, doing bloods, rewriting drug charts etc)
    4.) Generally considered useless by all
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Please elaborate. We will be you soon. We need to know what to expect.
    Yes I agree

    [Also love your sig! I tried to rep you but couldn't as too soon to do so again ]
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I'm looking forward to graduating, but not particularly looking forward to the job of a house officer. The downsides I can see from my shadowing:

    1.) It isn't really a training job. One hour a week of formal teaching + little independent decision making = service job.
    2.) Often huge numbers of patients (last HO had 40, over 3 consultants with no SHO and no Reg's available) with little senior support.
    3.) An enormous amount of essentially clerical or technical work to be done that is not useful in improving your medical knowledge (updating lists, booking scans, chasing results, doing cannulas, doing bloods, rewriting drug charts etc)
    4.) Generally considered useless by all
    I hate exams so, so much, that all sounds appealing compared to exam time.

    Money - Exams = Winning
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    I really liked opthalmology week. Really well taught and interesting.
    Some interesting cases like a lady who we newly diagnosed with Wet AMD who didn't have a clue she had it.

    Onto neurology now, and wishing I'd been a bit more like some of the keenos on here and actually learnt neuroanatomy in 2nd year >_<

    Will trade you neurology for surgery!
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    Revieved exam results today, done well, and now feeling a mass anti-climax and deflation - anyone else feel like this after exam results?!! Anyway, time to get get royally wrecked on post-exam results night out!
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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    Will trade you neurology for surgery!
    What kinda surgery - possibly up for this? :p:
 
 
 
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