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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) watch

  • View Poll Results: How did you feel the F212 exam went?
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    (Original post by Beni24)
    What does Polymerase do during Proteinsynthesis?
    DNA polymerase enzyme catalyst the condensation reaction between adjacent nucleotides of RNA to form the covalent bond between phosphate and ribose, so creates sugar phosphate backbone.
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    PLEASE
    difference between globular and fibourous proteins
    Differences between the structure of collagen and glucose
    please help me
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    (Original post by Beni24)
    What does Polymerase do during Proteinsynthesis?
    RNA Polymerase is used in transcription and catalyses the complementary base pairing between the bases on the DNA and free floating nucleotides
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    Can someone explain Sympatric speciation for me please?it says behavioural and physical change.. so is that due to mutation?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Sherlockedd)
    Anyone have a good answer for DNA replication. I get it, but idk how to write it :L
    Semi conservative replication

    Hydrogen bonds of DNA tertiary structure break double helix un-twists

    DNA hydrogen bonds between nitrogenous bases break, DNA unzips

    Both strands act as template strands

    Free DNA nucleotides hydrogen bond to complementary bases, pyramidines to purines, 3 h bonds in C-G and 2 inA-T

    DNA polymerase enzyme catalysed
    Condensation reaction to create sugar
    Phosphate back bond

    Continues down both DNA strands

    2 identical strands created watching having half from the original DNA molecule
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    similarities and differences between
    collagen
    haemoglobin
    starch
    amylose
    amylopectin
    glycogen
    cellulose

    please help
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    can someone give me a summary for CITES, Convention on Biological Diversity & EIA please? the book has sooo much context!
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    What does DNA helicase do?
    How do the hydrogen bonds between bases break in transcription and replication?
    Does DNA polymerase join the free nucletoides to the existing ones or does it join the sugar-phosphate backbone?
    What does RNA polymerase do?
    Can someone clear these up for me please
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    (Original post by t()m)
    DNA polymerase enzyme catalyst the condensation reaction between adjacent nucleotides of RNA to form the covalent bond between phosphate and ribose, so creates sugar phosphate backbone.
    Okay thank you!!
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    (Original post by cookiess)
    What paper did you find this question from?
    June 2010
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    (Original post by Smuu)
    Domains are Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryotae. Meanwhile kingdoms are Prokaryotae, Protoctista, Animalia, Plantae and Fungi. Prokaryotes are in the same group in the kingdom classification whereas they are divided into two domains in the domain classification. Eukaryotes are in four different groups in the kingdom classification but are in one domain in the domain classification. Hope that helped


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    Awesome, thank you !!
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    (Original post by Hannah196)
    can someone give me a summary for CITES, Convention on Biological Diversity & EIA please? the book has sooo much context!
    Just learn a couple for each one.
    CITES (highly doubt this will come up it was in Jan 2013):
    • Allow trade in artifically propagated plants
    • Regulate trade in selected species.
    • Ensure trade in wild plants is prohibited for commercial purposes.

    Rio Convention on Biodiversity ( came up in Jan 2013):
    • Conserve biodiversity
    • Share genetic resources
    • Share scientific knowledge and technologies

    Environmental Impact Assessment:
    • Procedure to assess the effects of a development on the environment
    • Minimises effects on biodiversity off area
    • E.g. a new bridge being built would be better in a higher area with more biodiversity, this is because it can withstand change
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    (Original post by Lawlser)
    I have typed up every single question asked in every past paper except Jan 2013 which the mark scheme answer under it so if anyone wants it just give me a PM with your email and I'll send you them!

    Please could u send me them thank u soo much
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    (Original post by Hannah196)
    can someone give me a summary for CITES, Convention on Biological Diversity & EIA please? the book has sooo much context!
    The Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)
    Aims to
    Regulate and monitor international trade in selected species of plants and animals
    Ensure that international trade does not endanger the survival of populations in
    the wild
    Ensure that trade in wide plants is prohibited for commercial purposes
    Ensure that trade in artificially propagated plants is allowed, subject to permit
    Ensure that some, slightly less endangered, wild species may be traded, subject to
    a permit, as agreed by the exporting and importing countries


    The Rio Convention on Biodiversity;
    Aims to
    Conserve biological diversity
    Use components sustainably
    Have appropriate shared access to genetic resources
    Have appropriate sharing and transfer of scientific knowledge and technologies
    Have fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the use of genetic
    resources
    significance of environmental impact assessments:
    They are a means of assessing the likely significant environmental impact of a development. The
    EIA ensures that the local planning authority makes it decision in the knowledge of any likely
    significant effects on the environment. This helps to ensure that the importance of the predicted
    effects is properly understood by the public and the planning authority before it makes it decision.

    hope this helps
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    I have never seen a real question on speciation, could someone please explain the difference between allopatric and sympatric? Thanks, Also could someone help me with this question: 'Why are vaccination programmes not always effective?' (4 marks)
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    What does everyone think about what os going to *** up
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    I just know there is going to be a QWC 8 marker of in situ and ex situ conservation and if that is the case I might throw a tantrum
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    (Original post by _JC95)
    I have never seen a real question on speciation, could someone please explain the difference between allopatric and sympatric? Thanks, Also could someone help me with this question: 'Why are vaccination programmes not always effective?' (4 marks)
    I'm not really sure- but I'll have a go.

    Firstly, not a high enough proportion of the population gets vaccinated (due to ethical reasons or worries about the side effects) so it becomes difficult to eradicate an illness.

    Also, many diseases mutate very quickly. This means that the shape of the antigen on their cell surface membrane changes shape so it cannot be recognised by memory cells as the shape is no longer complementary to their receptors, and antibodies are useless i.e. it has become a new strain and the body must produce a primary response again, meaning symptoms could occur as well as death.

    I don't know what else to put I'm not sure that would be worth 4 marks.
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    (Original post by GirlWithADream)
    Can someone answer my question pretty pleasee??
    What are the main steps of transcription and translation? (protein synthesis)?
    I get it, but I don't exactly know how to word it. Thanks
    thats unit 5 wait til ya get there ;o
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    State why a doctor wouldn't prescribe antibodies to treat influenza (1 mark)
    I'm unsure about this question and it may be really obvious :confused: It's only a small mark but it could make a difference!
 
 
 
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