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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Doesn't it scare you that they're professionals and they'll know a lot more about the subject matter? Asking as I've got to do the same thing to a hospital journal club. And well done on the first!
    Well, it was only a 1st for that little assignment. TBH, I'd been to a few and knew sort of what was expected of me.
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    Right, am I just being majorly derpy or is the hypothalamic-gonadal-pituitary axis just that graph that shows level of FSH/LH/Progesterone/estrogen over time in the menstrual cycle?

    (Original post by SMed)
    It wasn't a real hospital/medics journal club. But it was in front of two other academics who're leading that course module, and then some others from my course.

    I finally got a GPU which is due to come just when I start my project, can forget my BSc now.
    Sick, I still haven't got around to ordering my water-cooling bits .
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Right, am I just being majorly derpy or is the hypothalamic-gonadal-pituitary axis just that graph that shows level of FSH/LH/Progesterone/estrogen over time in the menstrual cycle?
    Its not the same graph, you should have negative feedback arrows from gonadal hormones back to hypothalamus and pituitary. Progesterone reduced the frequency (remembered it as progesterone affects pulse) of hypothalamus of secreting GnRH (as its in a pulstile manner and not constant secretion) and oestrogen reduces the amount. Can someone correct me though, did this about a year ago and not 100% sure.




    That is what the axis is for males. Its just the whole feedback loop stuff.

    The graph you're thinking is just how the hormone levels change over the menstrual cycle but the HPG axis explains why the curves in the cycle are the way they are.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Well, it was only a 1st for that little assignment. TBH, I'd been to a few and knew sort of what was expected of me.
    Any tips
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Its not the same graph, you should have negative feedback arrows from LH/FSH back to hypothalamus and pituitary. Progesterone reduced the frequencey (remembered it as progesterone affects pulse) of hypothalamus of secreting GnRH (as its in a pulstile manner and not constant secretion) and oestrogen reduces the amount. Can someone correct me though, did this about a year ago and not 100% sure.
    Ah, yeah, maybe I should have elaborated a little bit. On "my" graph I have that. So I've got the levels of estrogen/GnRH pulsation/progesteron/FSH/LH so it's all covered. As in you can see when estrogen goes up GnRH goes down.

    Totally forgot about the male version though, I'll have to recap that.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Ah, yeah, maybe I should have elaborated a little bit. On "my" graph I have that. So I've got the levels of estrogen/GnRH pulsation/progesteron/FSH/LH so it's all covered. As in you can see when estrogen goes up GnRH goes down.

    Totally forgot about the male version though, I'll have to recap that.
    Sorry, can't read. You did mention that but I think I just focused on the 'menstrual cycle' part of the sentence.

    All in all it's the same information but different visual representation. So yes.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Any tips
    Basically, you're doing a summary of the paper, along with a brief critical appraisal. The CA can either be after the brief summary, or as you go along each section. It's only 10 minutes, so there's not a lot you can say. For me I found it was just adding a few comments of critique after each summarised section. Then just some general comments at the end with how the study fits into what we know already and the current research that's out there. Is the study relevant and applicable to something useful for us (the audience you're speaking to or clinicians in general). Read around the topic a bit, and have a think about the limitations. If there are any specific techniques or anything that are mentioned in the study, have a read about them, especially if they're well known. A friend got marked down from a 1st to a high 2.1 because he couldn't remember what a PET scan was.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)



    This is going to require a long answer so here goes *deep breath*

    Spoiler:
    Show


    Firstly it depends on where you want to be in 10 years and do a project related to that. This doesn't mean that if you do change your mind in a year or two, that you can't go into another speciality etc. Doing an iBSc is brilliant and its mostly the skills that you pick up that are important than perhaps the subject matter. Perhaps do a PhD post Medicine to really prove that you're dedicated to something like renal or cardiovascular medicine (as those posts are more competitive).

    Secondly do you know much about Leicester iBSc schemes - we have two. Scheme A is the traditonal structure which is the same as intercalating externally. But Scheme B is the iBSc you can only do at your home university. This is a full year of research, no lectures/tutorials/exams. And it can be a full year of lab work or split between the clinical and lab work or maybe just 100% clinical. But the supervisors only take on one (or sometimes two) students per project and I think about 5 people apply for one. But again, its only competition from other internally intercalating medics so not that bad tbh.

    You might prefer this for many reasons (these are some of mine) - you get to concentrate on one mechanism rather than a subject (like physiology) so you'll only look at something like the effect of nitric oxide signalling in cardiac tissue in ischamic pre-conditioning. This means you can geek out and learn intricacies about one mechanism. Also better chance of getting published/posters/presentations etc as you're dedicating a whole year to full time research.

    I did it because I really want to go into research after Medicine, and wanted to take this opportunity to see if research really is for me. And rather than split lectures and lab work - I kinda wanted to immerse myself in pure labwork as if this is the only year I ever do research - then I sort of want to go all out.

    Looking back on hows it been so far, I've enjoyed it a lot and would definitely do it again. Its great as you learn so many skills such as looking at things analytically - I'd say my thought process has changed a lot, and you're also a lot more independant. And also you get to make decisions which is odd at first because of the medic in you thinks 'wait are you really asking for my opinion' which I really like as this is your project and you do get to make decisions.

    Whether you want go for Scheme A or B is, again, something you need to decide on.

    My personal choices were

    -iBSc Aerospace physiology at Kings
    -Scheme B iBSc Leicester

    But KCL didn't run the iBSc for the year I applied, did offered an MSc but said no at the time. And I didn't want to do Physiology so I went for Leicester.

    Go to the intercalation fair thing that happens in October I think. You can meet a lot of supervisors. A key thing I'd ask is if you'll be working alone or 'sharing' your project with a PhD student. How much of an impact the project will make in the research community. Ask how much input you'll be able to have, or is it all set up before you start.

    PM me if you have any questions


    Thank you- that has been incredibly useful! Any tips for semester 4, it seems so much more relaxed than last semester!
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    LOL
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    If i watch another cholectomy im going to crack. Emergency surgery in a small dgh is a complete joke!!
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    (Original post by _Andrew_)
    Thank you- that has been incredibly useful! Any tips for semester 4, it seems so much more relaxed than last semester!
    Enjoy it whilst you still can! But seriously,semester 3 is super crammed and then you spend semester 5 stressing out about Phase 1. I'd actually just try and finish the dissertation because as soon as its over it feels like you've got your life back . (She says in a jokily manner but its very much true). But yes sort of relax a bit and ooh how are you finding CPC?

    What SSC are you doing? And do not pick 'brain disorders and cell signalling' for semester 5. I did that thinking it would help immensely with neuro and M&R. It didn't and just added to the work.


    (Original post by SMed)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Basically, you're doing a summary of the paper, along with a brief critical appraisal. The CA can either be after the brief summary, or as you go along each section. It's only 10 minutes, so there's not a lot you can say. For me I found it was just adding a few comments of critique after each summarised section. Then just some general comments at the end with how the study fits into what we know already and the current research that's out there. Is the study relevant and applicable to something useful for us (the audience you're speaking to or clinicians in general). Read around the topic a bit, and have a think about the limitations. If there are any specific techniques or anything that are mentioned in the study, have a read about them, especially if they're well known. A friend got marked down from a 1st to a high 2.1 because he couldn't remember what a PET scan was.
    Merci beaucoup! Very helpful
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    I was in theatre with one of amateur transplants today
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)



    that axis is going to be insufficient to explain the female reproductive cycle, it ignore the roles of other hormones eg the inhibins, activins etc but it'd take forever to type out why so i won't . the gondatrophin axis in the laydeez is more complex than the standard HPA/HPT etc because superimposed on the circadian rhythm is the infradian aspect.
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    that axis is going to be insufficient to explain the female reproductive cycle, it ignore the roles of other hormones eg the inhibins, activins etc but it'd take forever to type out why so i won't . the gondatrophin axis in the laydeez is more complex than the standard HPA/HPT etc because superimposed on the circadian rhythm is the infradian aspect.
    That was just the first one that google gave me and I wanted to portray the feedback loop as the axis.

    Actually you know the biological clock is meant to be 25 hours long? They did that in sleep physiology with some patients, and concealed when it was day and night and found all the patients went into a 25 hour day cycle.

    Might explain why I'm always behind on work...
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    That was just the first one that google gave me and I wanted to portray the feedback loop as the axis.

    Actually you know the biological clock is meant to be 25 hours long? They did that in sleep physiology with some patients, and concealed when it was day and night and found all the patients went into a 25 hour day cycle.

    Might explain why I'm always behind on work...
    In young adults, 20-50, the clock runs long, around 24.5 hours - so that means we naturally want to get up half an hour later each day. There are studies showing a class of photoreceptors in the retina that detects light independently of the rods and cones and this acts as a reset for the clock depending on light - for some it is dawn, for others, dusk.

    Do you mean the aschoff experiments when they locked the students into dungeons? That was great for the guy that had a uber long clock, not so good for the chap running on half time.

    I did a course on clocks, sleep and biological time - best course ever
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I was in theatre with one of amateur transplants today
    Which one?
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    (Original post by Talexe)
    Which one?
    Since one of them quit medicine to do full time comedy, I'd put good money on it being Suman.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I was in theatre with one of amateur transplants today
    (Original post by Talexe)
    Which one?
    What's this about TED talks at Imperial? Is it real TED or what?
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    Sees pre-clinical post.....


    Does not read :p:
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    prsom
 
 
 
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