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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Can anyone enlighten me as to the mechanism behind UTIs causing confusion/collapse in elderly patients? I haven't studied the urinary system yet and I'm struggling to piece it together. At the moment I'm assuming it's just due to the subsequent fatigue and fever. Would there be any hypotension (but I'm thinking it would have to be pretty advanced for this?). Googling hasn't particularly helped.

    Cheers.
    Infection --> Pain --> Dehydration (+pain itself) --> Delirium

    Infection --> Urosepsis --> Shock --> Poor end organ perfusion --> Ischaemia --> Delirium
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    I don't think there is a well known mechanism. You can contrive your own woolly explanation or see what the literature says. However, at the moment, I suspect you won't elicit much.
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    Seeing all these finalists getting their jobs just makes me want to hurry up and graduate already.

    I'll probably eat those words one day
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    Seeing all these finalists getting their jobs just makes me want to hurry up and graduate already.

    I'll probably eat those words one day
    I can't wait mate.

    In other news, went to an absolutely hideous cardiac arrest today with an ambulance crew. Got stuck in though, doing the airway and putting LMAs down etc but not a great sight
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    In young adults, 20-50, the clock runs long, around 24.5 hours - so that means we naturally want to get up half an hour later each day. There are studies showing a class of photoreceptors in the retina that detects light independently of the rods and cones and this acts as a reset for the clock depending on light - for some it is dawn, for others, dusk.

    Do you mean the aschoff experiments when they locked the students into dungeons? That was great for the guy that had a uber long clock, not so good for the chap running on half time.

    I did a course on clocks, sleep and biological time - best course ever
    Old post sorry, but that is pretty cool. The photoreceptors that can detect light independantly. What that links me to is en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optogenetics there's been studies done with light activating neurons and, read it in a magazine on first day of iBSc (when everything was new and shiny, and had no idea about the masses of work to come but I digress)... and someone managed to change the behaviour of a drosophila fly by using light. And was trying to find the article and found this instead: http://www.popsci.com/science/articl...s-secrets-mind


    Science is awesome.

    I like sleep physiology, its like an exotic subject because unfortunately you don't cover it in Medicine. There was a component of it in my SSM, and I'm very much interested in diurnal rhythms especially with endocrinology.
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Old post sorry, but that is pretty cool. The photoreceptors that can detect light independantly. What that links me to is en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optogenetics there's been studies done with light activating neurons and, read it in a magazine on first day of iBSc (when everything was new and shiny, and had no idea about the masses of work to come but I digress)... and someone managed to change the behaviour of a drosophila fly by using light. And was trying to find the article and found this instead: http://www.popsci.com/science/articl...s-secrets-mind


    Science is awesome.

    I like sleep physiology, its like an exotic subject because unfortunately you don't cover it in Medicine. There was a component of it in my SSM, and I'm very much interested in diurnal rhythms especially with endocrinology.

    I feel really lucky, we has Prof Miesenbock, who basically invented the whole optogenetics thing, lecture us on the neuronal basis of consciousness and that experiment along with his other work is really quite incredible! that said unlike much of the genetic-type work in drosophila its clearly miles away from humans.

    Also very surprised you don't do sleep physiology? especially because there are sleep both directly and indirectly is such a huge part of so many pathologies.

    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I don't think there is a well known mechanism. You can contrive your own woolly explanation or see what the literature says. However, at the moment, I suspect you won't elicit much.
    i would rep you but i can't
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    Hey guys! Thought I'd come and join the party here now... just thought I'd start off by saying hi.
    Currently doing a PDS/VM essay on the role of doctors in society - as much as I love these socio-ethical topics (I know, I'm weird) 1500 words is far too short to cover "topics in a broad manner but go into detail for each one" as my tutor put it... fun times trying to hit the balance. Just finding ways to procrastinate now...

    Any other first year medics here or is this thread heavily dominated by those who've successfully passed pre-clinical exams?
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    I did that! Its awesome, I think in terms of work and assessments - its one of the hardest SSCs (along with Vasc bio) but the good thing is you cover all of physiology in this SSC... so you get to recap bilirubin, DM, LFTs, renal physiology. The Maths and Physics will die down but the CT/MRI stuff will be useful for Head & Neck for Head CTs and so on.

    Also you get lots pf physiology notes to use later on in revision

    Is that the drug design? I'd be a bit wary as heard half of the time that the tutor in Loughborough wouldn't turn up or something. There was a lot of delay, but ask people who did it last year as they should have fixed things by now. PS reason I wanted to (and should've done) Imaging after this SSM is because for that SSM you submit an essay on some imaging modality, and my essay in Phys Measurements was on carotid duplex. (If you're doing it something similar... there is a systematic review in the clin sci library which compares angiography, carotid duplex, and one more thing in terms of cost assessment. It has cost of everything - training people, how much the thing costs, how much to use annually, once off etc. So its brilliant to put in the cost assessment part of your essay).
    Thats very resassuring - thankyou! Yeah, I am finding the clinical aspects of the module interesting, and it has improved my understanding of ECG so much compared to the basics we had learned in the cardiovas module. I can't decide what to do my report on; I was quite sure I wanted to do it on lung functioning testing, and then yesterday we were told we shouldn't really do spirometery, as we've already covered it in resp:mad: The sem 5 SSC I had in mind was mechanisms of action, and clinical use of opiates; the module is run by my personal tutor, and he's an absolute edge!
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    (Original post by purplefrog)
    Hey guys! Thought I'd come and join the party here now... just thought I'd start off by saying hi.
    Currently doing a PDS/VM essay on the role of doctors in society - as much as I love these socio-ethical topics (I know, I'm weird) 1500 words is far too short to cover "topics in a broad manner but go into detail for each one" as my tutor put it... fun times trying to hit the balance. Just finding ways to procrastinate now...

    Any other first year medics here or is this thread heavily dominated by those who've successfully passed pre-clinical exams?
    Thread may well be dominated by those in clinical years, but you aren't the only first year around


    I can't believe anyone enjoys that psychosocial bull****.. makes me die a little bit inside whenever it comes up
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    I feel really lucky, we has Prof Miesenbock, who basically invented the whole optogenetics thing, lecture us on the neuronal basis of consciousness and that experiment along with his other work is really quite incredible! that said unlike much of the genetic-type work in drosophila its clearly miles away from humans.
    While interesting, I remember being distinctly bothered that he basically gave an entire lecture on his own research when I had his talk. Then again, if I'd done the stuff he's done I'd probably do the same.
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    I can't believe anyone enjoys that psychosocial bull****.. makes me die a little bit inside whenever it comes up
    Oh dear - get ready to do a hell alot of dying inside!

    Im sat here writing this stupid essay. Rock on when its finished - not like ive actually put that much effort into it in all honesty!

    In further news - even if i pass my finals i dont even know if im going to reach F1 - sigh!
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    (Original post by fairy spangles)
    In further news - even if i pass my finals i dont even know if im going to reach F1 - sigh!
    Why?
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    Never felt this **** in all my life. Great timing to get the flu. I have to hand in a draft of my introduction (about 3k) by next Thursday. I'm on 400 words and still rambling on about unecessary points. I somehow start all of my essays with a historical account/background to the subject area I'm writing about. What is wrong with me? Someone say that I can do this.
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    (Original post by i'm no superman)
    Never felt this **** in all my life. Great timing to get the flu. I have to hand in a draft of my introduction (about 3k) by next Thursday. I'm on 400 words and still rambling on about unecessary points. I somehow start all of my essays with a historical account/background to the subject area I'm writing about. What is wrong with me? Someone say that I can do this.
    You can do this :cool:
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    (Original post by Tyraell)
    While interesting, I remember being distinctly bothered that he basically gave an entire lecture on his own research when I had his talk. Then again, if I'd done the stuff he's done I'd probably do the same.
    very true, in fact the majority was on that experiment itself. I think he could sort of get away with it because consciousness at that level is a) extremely poorly understood and b) not examinable for 1st BM. i think we get that lecture just to make the most of having a big name in the department rather than for a balanced viewpoint which i think is fair enough. There's another specific lecture later in the term on consciousness itself from him so i'll have to see if he branches out there .
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    Thread may well be dominated by those in clinical years, but you aren't the only first year around


    I can't believe anyone enjoys that psychosocial bull****.. makes me die a little bit inside whenever it comes up
    Hi there! So how's first year treating you?

    I don't mind the ethics side of things and the really specific (rare, I know) sociology stuff that we do. Not to keen on the pysch and wide themed socio stuff. But when we've gone on placements quite a lot of the sociology we've been taught all clicks into place and it allows you to put a lot of the models into context. But the lectures themselves are always a bit of a drag. Thankfully we have Scambler at UCL who has written a book - so each of his lectures is literally a condensed summary of a chapter of his book

    My biggest annoyance is the amount of repetitive reflection we have to do in the portfolio UCL sets us - so many of the questions are simply rephrased versions of something three pages back! and its around 40 pages of the jazz to write up in total
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    (Original post by purplefrog)
    Hi there! So how's first year treating you?I don't mind the ethics side of things and the really specific (rare, I know) sociology stuff that we do. Not to keen on the pysch and wide themed socio stuff. But when we've gone on placements quite a lot of the sociology we've been taught all clicks into place and it allows you to put a lot of the models into context. But the lectures themselves are always a bit of a drag. Thankfully we have Scambler at UCL who has written a book - so each of his lectures is literally a condensed summary of a chapter of his book My biggest annoyance is the amount of repetitive reflection we have to do in the portfolio UCL sets us - so many of the questions are simply rephrased versions of something three pages back! and its around 40 pages of the jazz to write up in total
    First year seems to be going alright so far.. plenty of times when I swear I'm caring more about rowing than medicine, but I think that's understandable..
    Had a horrendous exam last friday but this two weeks is basically free time as we're on SSCs at the moment, loving it.

    What's life like at UCL then?

    Sounds like far too much socio-ethics for my liking.. :erm:
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    Just had a lecture on HIE and the case study we were given just left me WTFing.

    The neonate didn't have a heartbeat for 21 minutes, was birthed with no heart rate/respiration and had a pH of 6.6. Was delivered via C-section at 26 weeks after the mother originally presented with severe headache and abdo pain. On EEG the patient was seizing essentially consistently. Finally released at 5 weeks.

    The prognosis is exceptionally poor, still not succling after 5 months. At one year had severe evolving cerebral palsy and a severe global mental delay. Parent's still greiving.

    I honestly, honestly can not see the point in treating this patient in the first place. Just look at those stats. Essentially putting massive amounts of effort and money into a patient who will essentially be a veggie. I know this sounds harsh but I reckon the parents would have been better off if the baby hadn't made it. Maybe I'm looking at it the wrong way, I understand if the prognosis/outlook is slightly better but from the word go they must have realised this is essentially pointless. All they've managed to do is make the parents into life long carers.


    On an entirely different topic, will I get raged at by infection control if technically I'm not allowed a tie but if I wear a tie clip? I saw these "invisible" ones that connect through two buttons and the tie label. I much prefer wearing a tie than open collar and the complete lack of evidence to support the "infection control" claims are making me rage. At least if I get rid of the "dangling around" argument then I should be pretty safe, right? I looked in our trusts dress code but couldn't find anything concrete.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Just had a lecture on HIE and the case study we were given just left me WTFing.

    The neonate didn't have a heartbeat for 21 minutes, was birthed with no heart rate/respiration and had a pH of 6.6. Was delivered via C-section at 26 weeks after the mother originally presented with severe headache and abdo pain. On EEG the patient was seizing essentially consistently. Finally released at 5 weeks.

    The prognosis is exceptionally poor, still not succling after 5 months. At one year had severe evolving cerebral palsy and a severe global mental delay. Parent's still greiving.

    I honestly, honestly can not see the point in treating this patient in the first place. Just look at those stats. Essentially putting massive amounts of effort and money into a patient who will essentially be a veggie. I know this sounds harsh but I reckon the parents would have been better off if the baby hadn't made it. Maybe I'm looking at it the wrong way, I understand if the prognosis/outlook is slightly better but from the word go they must have realised this is essentially pointless. All they've managed to do is make the parents into life long carers.
    Tough call, I understand where you're coming from, and would probably be inclined to agree.

    On an entirely different topic, will I get raged at by infection control if technically I'm not allowed a tie but if I wear a tie clip? I saw these "invisible" ones that connect through two buttons and the tie label. I much prefer wearing a tie than open collar and the complete lack of evidence to support the "infection control" claims are making me rage. At least if I get rid of the "dangling around" argument then I should be pretty safe, right? I looked in our trusts dress code but couldn't find anything concrete.
    Not a single **** will be given about your clip. All they see is 'Tie' and all they know is 'No Tie'.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Tough call, I understand where you're coming from, and would probably be inclined to agree.
    I understand it's tough and could lead to a slippery slope of "who gets to live" but with HIE and in particular cases as bad as this I really cannot see the point. Surely if you're in resus for 21 minutes on a patient who wasn't did have a heart beat for an unknown period of time already then it's a lost cause?

    Not a single **** will be given about your clip. All they see is 'Tie' and all they know is 'No Tie'.
    FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU. Would they not see reason when I tell them it's clipped so poses no risk?

    I still don't even understand how this bull**** policy even got implimented. It's like some muppet thought it might be dodgy and got the go ahead despite having no evidence and further down the line CONTRADICTORY evidence came about but still we have to follow it.
 
 
 
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