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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU. Would they not see reason when I tell them it's clipped so poses no risk?
    >Implying infectionazis follow reason.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    >Implying infectionazis follow reason.
    You make a fair point *grumbles*.

    I might try it anyway, the invisible tie clip things are pretty cheap and the worse they do is make me put my tie in my bag.

    Can anybody check this picture over for me, I made it very quickly to put in my PBL notes and wanted to see if I'd made any mistakes.

    Name:  HypothalamicPituitaryOvarianAxis.png
Views: 76
Size:  34.1 KB

    EDIT: It starts in the top left. Just realised a mistake. In the first box it should start with low pulsatile release of GnRH for FSH preference and then in the inhibin box it should be high GnRH pulsations to LH.
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    Infection control. I an tempted to wear waistcoat and pocket watch just to piss them off...
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Infection control. I an tempted to wear waistcoat and pocket watch just to piss them off...
    Haha yes! I've seen a consultant with a pink shirt, waistcoat and a bow tie. The only thing he was missing was a snooker que.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    On an entirely different topic, will I get raged at by infection control if technically I'm not allowed a tie but if I wear a tie clip? I saw these "invisible" ones that connect through two buttons and the tie label. I much prefer wearing a tie than open collar and the complete lack of evidence to support the "infection control" claims are making me rage. At least if I get rid of the "dangling around" argument then I should be pretty safe, right? I looked in our trusts dress code but couldn't find anything concrete.
    I do know lads who wear a tie clip (though a visible one) and I don't believe anything's ever been said about it.
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    Really enjoyed reading through this blog. Thought to share it here:

    http://stuffmedicalstudentslike.wordpress.com/

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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Infection control. I an tempted to wear waistcoat and pocket watch just to piss them off...
    I have a pocket watch (but don't wear it as it looks weird on girls, just bought it as it looked vintage).

    Pocket watches should be fine though? As you just wear them with their clip?
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Just had a lecture on HIE and the case study we were given just left me WTFing.

    The neonate didn't have a heartbeat for 21 minutes, was birthed with no heart rate/respiration and had a pH of 6.6. Was delivered via C-section at 26 weeks after the mother originally presented with severe headache and abdo pain. On EEG the patient was seizing essentially consistently. Finally released at 5 weeks.

    The prognosis is exceptionally poor, still not succling after 5 months. At one year had severe evolving cerebral palsy and a severe global mental delay. Parent's still greiving.

    I honestly, honestly can not see the point in treating this patient in the first place. Just look at those stats. Essentially putting massive amounts of effort and money into a patient who will essentially be a veggie. I know this sounds harsh but I reckon the parents would have been better off if the baby hadn't made it. Maybe I'm looking at it the wrong way, I understand if the prognosis/outlook is slightly better but from the word go they must have realised this is essentially pointless. All they've managed to do is make the parents into life long carers.
    Based on a real case? It happens - when I did Paeds we had something similar but birth complications at term (not going for too many details as want to avoid identifiability) but additional complications of a mother who was technically still a Paeds patient herself + anxious social services & multiple 'strategy meetings'.
    Also had other patients 'stepped down' to us from a super super specialized hospital that took many babies in very poor condition at birth, whose prognosis was uncertain... I wonder what's happening.


    Difficult judgement calls/medicolegal situations for people to decide against resuscitation & so going for the 'least restrictive option' of belts & braces?

    Then ongoing difficulties with having those DNAR discussions (mechanisms seem to be aspiration pneumonias, status epilepticus, further ischaemia etc.) especially if multiple professionals involved & not all singing from the same sheet with a clear consistent message...

    They may be lifelong carers but the life may not be long.



    (Sheesh, if I get pregnant I'm going to be a nervous/superstituous wreck for 9 months! )
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    I understand it's tough and could lead to a slippery slope of "who gets to live" but with HIE and in particular cases as bad as this I really cannot see the point. Surely if you're in resus for 21 minutes on a patient who wasn't did have a heart beat for an unknown period of time already then it's a lost cause?
    But if you've made the decision to resuscitate, and then it's been "successful," it becomes much harder to withdraw, especially when it's kiddies. If I had pre-eclampsia at 26 weeks, I'm not sure I'd want them to resuscitate the child if it was born with no signs of life, precisely because of the likelihood of ending up in a situation like you describe.

    There was a really good documentary on this sort of thing a while ago, but unfortunately I can't remember what it was called or what channel it was on. :o:
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    why did i ever choose to study medicine!? -_-
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    (Original post by KiranG)
    why did i ever choose to study medicine!? -_-
    :hi:

    Also, what's up?
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    Lost my sub to this thread. I've just given up on these exams. I've convinced myself to get a 1st on the project so that my 2.2 or 3rd on the exam will be dragged up. I'm bad with exams, but I don't think I've ever been this unmotivated to work. Exams are on 21-23rd. I don't even care. lol
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    Neuro...i look forward to spending the weekend with you in the library...
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Lost my sub to this thread. I've just given up on these exams. I've convinced myself to get a 1st on the project so that my 2.2 or 3rd on the exam will be dragged up. I'm bad with exams, but I don't think I've ever been this unmotivated to work. Exams are on 21-23rd. I don't even care. lol
    I am like that with the BSc exams I have had so far (and the one I have next Friday). I think I'm so cba because I know its not medicine and the exams doesn't really count for much of the degree. Really bad attitude to have. With us, 40% of our final grade comes from the project/dissertation alone. A further 10% of our final grade comes from project related work - so exams on stats and research methods and essays on data collection, analysis and dissemination etc. So yeah, that's also why I am probably not taking the exams that seriously (as all together with the other essays and presentations we do throughout the year, its 50% of the year - with only ~30/35% of that 50% being down to the exams alone). What proportion of your final grade comes from the project alone?
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    2 written assignments + 1 reflective writing due in 3 days. Procrastination sucks. Also got a placement based assessment on Monday, which I haven't studied for. **** hitting the fan! :woo:
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Lost my sub to this thread. I've just given up on these exams. I've convinced myself to get a 1st on the project so that my 2.2 or 3rd on the exam will be dragged up. I'm bad with exams, but I don't think I've ever been this unmotivated to work. Exams are on 21-23rd. I don't even care. lol
    I feel so bad for you. One of my best friends is intercalating at Imperial this year. She has her exams next week as well. I'd be quite frankly ****ting myself if I was in her position. If it's any consolation, I'm in a similar position... I've done well in all my in course assessments / courseworks but there's absolutely no chance I'll be able to go through a good 50+ lectures from 2.5 modules well to even get a 2ii in the essay exams. I'm in labs five days a week from 9am - 6pm till the end of March. I don't know when I'll finish this dissertation. I'll be lucky to start revision (more like reading up lectures for the first time) just two weeks before I sit them. If I get a 1st in my lab project then I think I'd need to get a mid 2ii to get a 2i overall. I just want to finish this year and start clinics.
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    I am like that with the BSc exams I have had so far (and the one I have next Friday). I think I'm so cba because I know its not medicine and the exams doesn't really count for much of the degree. Really bad attitude to have. With us, 40% of our final grade comes from the project/dissertation alone. A further 10% of our final grade comes from project related work - so exams on stats and research methods and essays on data collection, analysis and dissemination etc. So yeah, that's also why I am probably not taking the exams that seriously (as all together with the other essays and presentations we do throughout the year, its 50% of the year - with only ~30/35% of that 50% being down to the exams alone). What proportion of your final grade comes from the project alone?
    The written exams are about 42% I think. In-course assessments are 18% and I've averaged a solid 2.1 on those. Just cannot be arsed, but still go through bouts transient panic, but still do nothing. The project is 40%, of that 12% is on in-project performance (basically showing up) and the presentation and 28% is on the actual 6000 word write-up.


    (Original post by i'm no superman)
    I feel so bad for you. One of my best friends is intercalating at Imperial this year. She has her exams next week as well. I'd be quite frankly ****ting myself if I was in her position. If it's any consolation, I'm in a similar position... I've done well in all my in course assessments / courseworks but there's absolutely no chance I'll be able to go through a good 50+ lectures from 2.5 modules well to even get a 2ii in the essay exams. I'm in labs five days a week from 9am - 6pm till the end of March. I don't know when I'll finish this dissertation. I'll be lucky to start revision (more like reading up lectures for the first time) just two weeks before I sit them. If I get a 1st in my lab project then I think I'd need to get a mid 2ii to get a 2i overall. I just want to finish this year and start clinics.
    For the most part, I'm just loosely reading through some of my summary notes I've made. Problem is, I've taken out quite a few chunks of 'themes/topics' within the modules. Stuff that I didn't understand or remember all that well to begin with, so that I can divert more time to better topics. We get a choice of 1 out of 3 essay questions, and 3 out of 5 SAQs. So hopefully I'll get somewhat lucky and can just get away with the topics I've chosen to focus on. I would've spread myself too thin trying to do all of it. But I've probably taken out too much too. Oh well.

    I was tempted to just completely blow off the BSc year and take a mid-medschool gap year. Just such little motivation to care about this.


    /whining
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    lol Few simple calculations.

    I estimate I probably have gotten about 65% ish on my ICAs.
    If I get 50% on the written exam, I'll need a 68-69% on the project to get a 2.1 overall.

    So like I said, I'll probably pretty much need a 1st on the project (over 70%) to get a 2.1. I reckon doing the project will be somewhat easier for me to get into. More work, but I'll actually be doing stuff and having regular meet ups with my supervisor and can get guidance. Plus I like the topic I'm doing. And maybe I can scrape higher than 50% on the exam, but I'm not holding my breath.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Tough call, I understand where you're coming from, and would probably be inclined to agree.



    Not a single **** will be given about your clip. All they see is 'Tie' and all they know is 'No Tie'.

    This is what I've encountered. I now just tuck in my tie very high up on my shirt so that it barely goes down past my chest.

    Time for a move to the bow tie fulltime.


    On an unrelated note: what do people think about these BMJ online elearning modules - any good? Worth anything?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    But if you've made the decision to resuscitate, and then it's been "successful," it becomes much harder to withdraw, especially when it's kiddies. If I had pre-eclampsia at 26 weeks, I'm not sure I'd want them to resuscitate the child if it was born with no signs of life, precisely because of the likelihood of ending up in a situation like you describe.

    There was a really good documentary on this sort of thing a while ago, but unfortunately I can't remember what it was called or what channel it was on. :o:
    It was brilliant - I think it was the Netherlands that were great in how they managed these very premature and ill babies.

    23 Weeks: the price of life. On BBC.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcHKHgih-Nk
 
 
 
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