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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    totally unprepared for this exam
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    I just know there is going to be a QWC 8 marker of in situ and ex situ conservation and if that is the case I might throw a tantrum
    Draw a table. Have 2 examples for positive institu and 2 examples for exsitu and the same for disadvantages that's your 8 marks
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    (Original post by jadec123)
    State why a doctor wouldn't prescribe antibodies to treat influenza (1 mark)
    I'm unsure about this question and it may be really obvious :confused: It's only a small mark but it could make a difference!
    Influenza is a virus..and will not be affected by antibiotics!
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    (Original post by morvenrkr)
    PLEASE
    difference between globular and fibourous proteins
    Differences between the structure of collagen and glucose
    please help me
    Collagen
    Amino acids monomers
    Cross links
    Fibrous
    Insoluble
    Mainly consists of Glyceine (35%)
    Structural role
    left hand helix structure.
    no prosthetic group

    Glucose? (alpha or beta)
    do you mean glycogen or cellulose?
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    (Original post by jadec123)
    State why a doctor wouldn't prescribe antibodies to treat influenza (1 mark)
    I'm unsure about this question and it may be really obvious :confused: It's only a small mark but it could make a difference!
    Antibodies will only cure a bacterial infection, influenza is a viral infection.
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Draw a table. Have 2 examples for positive institu and 2 examples for exsitu and the same for disadvantages that's your 8 marks
    Thats some good advice, but I'm not entirely sure I could think of 8 marks if it was for ONLY in situ or ONLY ex situ.
    Could you help me with some?
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    (Original post by jadec123)
    State why a doctor wouldn't prescribe antibodies to treat influenza (1 mark)
    I'm unsure about this question and it may be really obvious :confused: It's only a small mark but it could make a difference!
    That's because antibodies are only effective against bacteria. Influenza is a virus
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    (Original post by _JC95)
    I have never seen a real question on speciation, could someone please explain the difference between allopatric and sympatric? Thanks, Also could someone help me with this question: 'Why are vaccination programmes not always effective?' (4 marks)
    Here's what i found for the first one (out of text book)
    Allopatric- This is when species are geographically separated to different habitats/areas which will prevent effective interbreeding between the individuals of the two separate populations (but same species). Different groups of the same species living in different areas (for example, islands) will be unlikely to interbreed because they will have more variation (due to adaptations to their particular environment) and through generations won't be able to interbreed with species on the other island. This is allopatric speciation.
    Sympatric-Sometimes reproductive barriers can arise within a population due to a biochemical change which prevents fertilisation, behavior changes (eg. courtship dance isn't recognised) or physical changes where sexual organs are no longer compatible. Any change that prevents just one member of the population breeding with another can introduce a reproductive barrier. This is sympatric speciation.
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    Thats some good advice, but I'm not entirely sure I could think of 8 marks if it was for ONLY in situ or ONLY ex situ.
    Could you help me with some?
    If it asked about In Situ.. then I'd list 4 advantages and 4 disadvantades (for 8 marks)

    Advantages:
    Animals remain in their natural habitat
    provides permanent protection
    Allows development of sustainable use such as eco-tourism
    Maintains cultural heritage
    Can aid scientific research

    Disadvantages:
    Protected animals may escape
    Illegal Harvesting
    Illegal hunting
    Tourists feeding animals and littering

    the same would go for ex-siu (4 advantages and 4 disadvantages)
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    I just know there is going to be a QWC 8 marker of in situ and ex situ conservation and if that is the case I might throw a tantrum
    me too :unimpressed: It's a pretty easy thing to learn if you KNOW the stuff but it's so boring to read it over and over again :blah:
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    Guys why do we breed dwarf varieties of wheat, I get that we need to cross them with high yield varieties but why do we want them to be dwarfed what advantages are there to this?
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    (Original post by milworthy)
    Thats some good advice, but I'm not entirely sure I could think of 8 marks if it was for ONLY in situ or ONLY ex situ.
    Could you help me with some?
    Insitu
    Advantages: role in food web not affect by them remaing in habitat, biodiversity maintained
    Facilitates accurate scientific research of species in wild

    Ecotourism-people want to see animals in wild

    Disadvantages: harder to control specie's diet and monitor disease etc

    People still hunt or steal plants, chop trees
    Tourist drop litter


    Exsitu:
    Ad:
    More likely to have successful breeding programmes
    High chance of preventing extinction compared to insitu

    Disadvantages: effects other organism, biodiversity left in wild

    Gene pool variation limited in small popular
    reintroduction is hard and often animals are rejected by wild counterparts
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    (Original post by rival_)
    Guys why do we breed dwarf varieties of wheat, I get that we need to cross them with high yield varieties but why do we want them to be dwarfed what advantages are there to this?
    Dwarf so shorter stems so therefore less time needed to create yield and that's cause they require less energy to as they don't have to create long stem.
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    (Original post by Flower786123)
    Please could u send me them thank u soo much
    me too please. Thank you `!
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    Am i right in thinking :
    Primary defenses
    > Mucous membranes
    > Skin
    etc...
    Secondary Defences
    > Action of phagocytes and lymphocytes


    Primary Response
    > First Infection
    > Slow
    > Symptoms produced
    > B & T lymphocytes activated
    > Memory cells produced

    Secondary Response
    > Second Infection
    > Faster
    > No symptoms produced
    > Memory cells activated (which recognise pathogens, clone etc... )


    Non Specific Immune Response
    > Skin and Mucous membraner, cillia, hairs, lysozomes in tears etc...
    > Phagocytosis my macrophages

    Specific Immune response
    > Clonal selection of T lymphocytes
    > Clonal expansion of T lymphocytes
    > Differentiation of T lymphocytes
    > Clonal selection of B lymphocytes
    etc....... to make plasma cells and memory cells etc?

    Sorry there are so many responses, primary, specific i get confused - just making sure
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    So our biology teacher taught us about DNA ligase, helicase, okazaki fragments etc. and I had a look through the specification and the only technical word we need to know for replication is DNA polymerase... I'VE WASTED MY TIME
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Dwarf so shorter stems so therefore less time needed to create yield and that's cause they require less energy to as they don't have to create long stem.
    Legend.
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    (Original post by rival_)
    Legend.
    Lol cheers. Any other problems this is good revision for me
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    (Original post by jadec123)
    So our biology teacher taught us about DNA ligase, helicase, okazaki fragments etc. and I had a look through the specification and the only technical word we need to know for replication is DNA polymerase... I'VE WASTED MY TIME
    What is the difference between DNA helicase, ligase and polymerase.
    Dont worry because in marks chemes you get the AVP marks for saying extra
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Lol cheers. Any other problems this is good revision for me
    Yeah urm you know the Rio conventions?
 
 
 
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