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OCR Biology F212 Revision [3rd June 2013] (Now Closed) Watch

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    what do we need to know about the immune response
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    I just did January 2011's paper and one of the questions said 'Other than biochemical evidence, what can taxonomists use to group organisms?'
    So my answers were morphology (anatomy) and behaviour
    But in the mark scheme it grouped anatomy and behaviour into one marking point.
    Does anyone have any idea of their reasoning behind this, when other years they were separate marking points?

    :confused::confused:
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    (Original post by rival_)
    Yeah urm you know the Rio conventions?
    Rio convention on biodiversity:

    Aims: converse biological biodiversity
    Share access to genetic resources
    Share technologies and scientific knowledge
    Share benefits from genetic resources equally
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    (Original post by SamuelJ)
    I just did January 2011's paper and one of the questions said 'Other than biochemical evidence, what can taxonomists use to group organisms?'
    So my answers were morphology (anatomy) and behaviour
    But in the mark scheme it grouped anatomy and behaviour into one marking point.
    Does anyone have any idea of their reasoning behind this, when other years they were separate marking points?

    :confused::confused:
    That was exactly what happend when I did that paper. I guess we just need to keep that in mind and write more than two answers for insurance.

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    (Original post by SamuelJ)
    I just did January 2011's paper and one of the questions said 'Other than biochemical evidence, what can taxonomists use to group organisms?'
    So my answers were morphology (anatomy) and behaviour
    But in the mark scheme it grouped anatomy and behaviour into one marking point.
    Does anyone have any idea of their reasoning behind this, when other years they were separate marking points?

    :confused::confused:
    Always safe to write a load of them so
    Anatomy
    Biochemistry
    Genetics
    Embryology
    Physiology
    Behavioural
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    (Original post by t()m)
    DNA polymerase enzyme catalyst the condensation reaction between adjacent nucleotides of RNA to form the covalent bond between phosphate and ribose, so creates sugar phosphate backbone.
    I thought it 'unzipped' the DNA in readyness for translation? :confused:
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    Who else prefers it when the questions don't ask for a specific number of answers and just have e.g. (3) next to it, I write like 5 points just in case, hoping at least 3 are on the mark scheme. But when they ask for 3 points in the question and you know they're going to ignore any other answers beyond that, you kinda just have to rely on the mark scheme to say what you want it to say :|
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    I thought it 'unzipped' the DNA in readyness for translation? :confused:
    Is that not DNA helixase ... On pass papers MS It only mentions DNA polymerase see paper may 2011 q7 and the marscheme point 9 says so.
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    similarities and differences between collagen and haemoglobin
    anyone please?
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Is that not DNA helixase ... On pass papers MS It only mentions DNA polymerase see paper may 2011 q7 and the marscheme point 9 says so.
    Well I've always seen DNA polymerase as moving along the DNA molecule and exposing the part wanted for the free RNA nucleotides to join onto.
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    I might be wrong though...That's just what I've always thought!
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    I really hope that conservation doesn't come up as a long question. I know nothing about it. Everything else I'm fine with - but knowing my luck, conservation probably WILL come up tomorrow.
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    anyone else just get stressed and cant remember anything but then you cant stop revising because what if you stop and then it turned out you didnt know anything in the first place :l
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    Well I've always seen DNA polymerase as moving along the DNA molecule and exposing the part wanted for the free RNA nucleotides to join onto.
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    I might be wrong though...That's just what I've always thought!
    Well It probable involved in both do you or anybody else on here know of pass paper question on protein synthesis ??
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    (Original post by sharifma)
    similarities and differences between collagen and haemoglobin
    anyone please?
    Similarities
    - both proteins with amino acid monomers
    - Both quarternary structure
    - Both have H bonds in their structure

    Differences
    - Haemoglobin contains 4 polypeptide subunits (2 alpha, 2 beta), collagen only has 3
    - Collagen is fibrous, Hb is globular (so collagen is helical but Hb is a ball shape)
    - haemoglobin has a haem group (fe2+)
    - Hb is soluble, cellulose insoluble
    - Collagen has cross links
    - Hb contains a wide range of amino acids but collagen is predominantly glycine
    - Collagen does not really have a tertiary structure with all the bonds, it kind of skips that step. It's quartenary as it contains more than 1 polypeptide chain
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Well It probable involved in both do you or anybody else on here know of pass paper question on protein synthesis ??
    It must have loads of functions

    tbh I think it's one of those really detailed things that we don't really need to know about, they just tell us it exists I hate it when they do that but hey :cool:
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    (Original post by sharifma)
    similarities and differences between collagen and haemoglobin
    anyone please?
    Similarities:
    Both have Quaternary structure (more than one polypeptide chain)
    Both have polypeptide chains
    Both made of amino acids
    Both have hydrogen bonds
    Both have peptide bonds

    Erm, my similarities aren't that great..

    Differences:
    Haemoglobin has a prosthetic group, collagen doesn't
    Haemoglobin soluble, collagen isn't
    Haemoglobin globular, collagen fibrous
    Haemoglobin 4 polypeptide chains, collagen 3
    Haemoglobin found in blood, collagen structural and found in blood vessel walls
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    similarities and differences between please
    glycogen
    starch, cellulose
    amylopectin and amylose
    anyone please?
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    (Original post by t()m)
    Well It probable involved in both do you or anybody else on here know of pass paper question on protein synthesis ??
    Jan 2013 has a tricky one quite early on.
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    (Original post by coco_madem0iselle)
    Similarities:
    Both have Quaternary structure (more than one polypeptide chain)
    Both have polypeptide chains
    Both made of amino acids
    Both have hydrogen bonds
    Both have peptide bonds

    Erm, my similarities aren't that great..

    Differences:
    Haemoglobin has a prosthetic group, collagen doesn't
    Haemoglobin soluble, collagen isn't
    Haemoglobin globular, collagen fibrous
    Haemoglobin 4 polypeptide chains, collagen 3
    Haemoglobin found in blood, collagen structural and found in blood vessel walls
    thanks
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    (Original post by g.k.galloway)
    It must have loads of functions

    tbh I think it's one of those really detailed things that we don't really need to know about, they just tell us it exists I hate it when they do that but hey :cool:
    How I learnt it was DNA helicase (don't think we need to know that specifically) catalyses unzipping of DNA strands and breakage of hydrogen bonds.
    blah blah blah (haha)
    Then DNA polymerase catalyses linkage of hydrogen bonds and then the sugar phosphate backbone reforms with phosphodiester bonds.

    I think just mentioning DNA polymerase and the hydrogen bonds/sugar phosphate backbone reforming gets you a mark.
 
 
 
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